Integrated Programs

 

GENERAL: NIFA Integrated Programs provide support for integrated research, education, and extension activities. Integrated, multi-functional projects are particularly effective in addressing important agricultural issues through the conduct of problem-focused research that is combined with education and extension of knowledge to those in need of solutions. These activities address critical national, regional, and multi-state agricultural issues, priorities, or problems. Integrated Programs hold the greatest potential to produce and disseminate knowledge and technology directly to end users while providing for educational opportunities to assure agricultural expertise in future generations. See individual program Requests for Applications for additional information about the topics. SEVERAL PROGRAMS ARE FUNDED UNDER CFDA 10.303. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES ARE AS FOLLOWS: (1) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program: National Integrated Water Quality Program The goal of the National Integrated Water Quality Program is to improve the quality of our Nation's surface water and groundwater resources through research, education, and extension activities. Projects funded through this program will facilitate achieving this goal by advancing and disseminating the knowledge base available to agricultural and rural communities. Funded projects should lead to science-based decision-making and management practices that improve the quality of the Nation's surface water and groundwater resources in agricultural and rural watersheds. See RFA for priority areas. (2) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program: National Integrated Food Safety Initiative The purpose of the National Integrated Food Safety Initiative is to support food safety projects that demonstrate an integrated approach to solving problems in applied food safety research, education, or extension. Various models for integration of applied research, education, and extension will be considered for funding. Applications describing multi-state, multi-institutional, multidisciplinary, and multifunctional activities (and combinations thereof) are encouraged. Applicants are strongly encouraged to address at least two of the three functional areas of research, education, and extension (i.e., research and extension, research and education, or extension and education). (3) Integrated Research, Education, And Extension Competitive Grants Program: Regional Integrated Pest Management Centers The goal of the Regional Integrated Pest Management Centers (IPM Centers) is to promote the development and implementation of IPM by facilitating collaboration across states, disciplines, and purposes. IPM Centers will establish and maintain information networks, build partnerships to address pest management challenges and opportunities, evaluate the impact of IPM implementation, communicate positive outcomes to key stakeholders, and manage funding resources effectively. Successful applicants to this program will demonstrate the capacity and commitment necessary to advance the goals of the National Roadmap for Integrated Pest Management (www.ipmcenters.org/IPMRoadMap.pdf), and evaluate the progress of this advancement. The IPM Roadmap addresses pest management needs for production agriculture, natural resources and recreational environments, and residential and public areas. (4) Integrated Pest Management: Crops at Risk Program The goal of the CAR program is to enhance the development and implementation of innovative, ecologically based sustainable IPM system(s). Preferably, this should involve a diversity of tactics and approaches for a single or specific food or fiber commodity in commercial production for pre- and/or post-harvest system(s). The program addresses either a major acreage or high value crop commodity such as key fruits and vegetables. The primary emphasis is on crop productivity and profitability, while addressing critical environmental quality and human health issues. The CAR program will fund integrated multifunctional/multidisciplinary research, education, and extension projects for crops with high priority IPM needs as identified by stakeholders. (5) Integrated Pest Management: Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program The goal of the Risk Avoidance and Mitigation (RAMP) program is to enhance the development and implementation of innovative, ecologically based sustainable IPM strategies and system(s) for (a) multi-crop food and fiber production systems; (b) an area-wide or a landscape scale agroecosystem; or (c) a documented pesticide impact on water, human or environmental health. RAMP applications may address major acreage agricultural production systems, high value crops such as key fruit and vegetable systems, or other agroecosystems. The primary emphasis of the application should be on productivity and profitability while addressing critical environmental quality and human health issues. The intent of RAMP is to fund medium-term projects that emphasize systems approaches. (6) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program: Integrated Pest Management: Methyl Bromide Transitions Program The goal of the Methyl Bromide Transitions (MBT) program is to support the discovery and implementation of practical pest management alternatives to methyl bromide uses or minimize methyl bromide emissions for which the United States is requesting critical use exemptions. The program is focused on integrated commercial or field scale research that targets short- to medium-term solutions. (7) Integrated Organic Program The purpose of the Integrated Organic Program is to solve critical organic agriculture issues, priorities, or problems through the integration of research, education, and extension activities. The Organic Transitions Program (ORG) funds the development and implementation of research, extension, and higher education programs to improve the competitiveness of organic producers and producers who are adopting organic practices. Funding opportunities for the ORG Program is included in the same Request for Applications (RFA) as the Organic Research and Extension Initiative (OREI). PLEASE NOTE: THIS PROGRAM DOES NOT FUND START UP BUSINESSES. (8) Regional Rural Development Centers (RRDCs): The RRDCs play a unique role in USDA's service to rural America. They link the research and educational outreach capacity of the nation's public universities with communities, local decision makers, entrepreneurs, families, and farmers and ranchers to help address a wide range of development issues. They collaborate on national issues that span regions-like e-commerce, the changing interface between rural, suburban, and urban places, and workforce quality and jobs creation. Each tailors programs to address particular needs in its region.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
10.303
Federal Agency/Office
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of Agriculture
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
B - Project Grants
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2016 For Fiscal Year 2016: (A) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program - National Integrated Water Quality Program: No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI): No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers aka Integrated pest Mgmt./Biological Control: No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation: No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program): No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (F) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition (aka MBT): For FY 2016, approximately $1.8 million was available for awards. Thirteen (13) submitted proposals will be peer reviewed and awards will be made by September 30, 2016. The funding rate is anticipated to be approximately 30%. (G) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Organic Transitions(aka ORG): For the FY 2016 award cycle, about $3.7 million was available for grant awards after deducting legislatively authorized set-asides. A total of 47 applications, requesting a total of $22,790,906, were received in this year’s competition. In July 2016, an 8-member peer review virtual panel will evaluate these applications. The peer panel includes faculty from land grant universities, researchers from USDA Agricultural Research Service and a non-profit stakeholder group. Funding decisions are not yet made but it is anticipated that about 8 new awards will be made in FY 2016 representing 17% success rate. (H) Regional Rural Development Centers: NIFA announced the availability of grant funds and requests applications for the Regional Rural Development Centers (RRDC) Competitive Grants Program for fiscal year (FY) 2016 to link the research and educational outreach capacity of the nation's public universities with communities, local decision makers, entrepreneurs, families, and farmers and ranchers to help address a wide range of development issues for prosperity for sustainable and secure communities will always be a matter of public interest. RRDC’s leverage land-grant resources in pursuit of USDA’s rural development mission by bringing together the most innovative minds, from inside and outside universities, to address cutting-edge issues without regard to state boundaries. They respond to emerging issues, generate credible science-based information to clarify these issues, and create public-private partnerships to address them. The amount available for support of this program in FY 2016 was $950,400 ($237,600 per center). The grant deadline was June 2, 2016. Four (4) proposals were reviewed and recommended for funding. (I) Rapid Responses to Pests & Pathogens (formerly Critical Issues): No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2016: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI): No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers (aka RIPM) aka Integrated pest Mgmt./Biological Control (aka IPM Centers - - NOT RIPM) NOTE: Formerly RIPM - CFDA 10.500 and Research - CFDA 10.200 (funded via Smith-Lever 3 (d) and P.L. 89-106) (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program?) SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition For Fiscal Year (FY) 2016: For the FY 2016, the National Institute of Food and Agriculture awarded four awards that ranged from $418,313 to $499.999 for a total of approximately $1.89 million. The funding rate was 31%. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG) FDC "51106" NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI - FDC "51300" For Fiscal Year (FY) 2016: For the FY 2016 award cycle, $3,777,222 was available for project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs. A total of 47 applications, requesting a total of $22,790,906, were received. In July 2016, a 12-member peer review virtual panel evaluated these applications. The peer panel included faculty from land grant universities, researchers from USDA Agricultural Research Service and a non-profit stakeholder group. Funds were available to support a total of 8 new awards. The funding ratio for this program in FY16 was 17%. Funded projects seek to support the development and implementation of research, extension and higher education programs to improve the competitiveness of organic livestock and crop producers, as well as those who are adopting organic practices by studying and documenting environmental services provided by organic farming systems in the area of soil conservation and climate change mitigation, including greenhouse gases. Projects were also funded to develop strategies to limit barriers to organic transition. All projects integrate research, education and extension activities. (H) Regional Rural Development Centers For Fiscal Year (FY) 2016: The amount available for support of this program in FY 2016 $950,720 million ($237,680 per center) Four proposals were submitted and accepted in GAC. Four proposals underwent a Noncompetitive Merit Review by three reviewers with NIFA. All four were recommended to receive funding for “Regional Rural Development Centers” grant. Amounts awarded to the four institutions throughout the United States are: Location #1 Amount: $ 237,680 Location #2 Amount: $ 237,680 Location #3 Amount: $ 237,680 Location #4 Amount: $ 237,680
Fiscal Year 2017 Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 – ACTIVE Programs: In Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, the amount appropriated for this Program was $8,000,000. The amount available for awards was $7,571,059, after legislatively mandated set-asides. (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition; For FY 2017, The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) made four (4) awards that ranged from $393,049 to $499,998. The total amount awarded was approximately $ 1.8 million. The funding rate was 31%. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG); and NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI For the FY 2017 award cycle, approximately $3.7 million was available for project grant awards, after legislatively mandated set-asides. A total of 44 applications, requesting a total of $20,832,046 were received. In June 2017, a 12-member (plus two ad hoc) peer review virtual panel evaluated these applications. The peer panel included faculty from land grant universities, researchers from USDA Agricultural Research Service and a non-profit stakeholder group. Funds were available to support a total of 8 new awards. The funding ratio for this program in FY17 was 18%. Funded projects seek to support the development and implementation of research, extension and higher education programs to improve the competitiveness of organic livestock and crop producers, as well as those who are adopting organic practices by studying and documenting environmental services provided by organic farming systems in the area of soil conservation and climate change mitigation, including greenhouse gases. Projects were also funded to develop cultural practices and other allowable alternatives to substances recommended for removal from the National Organic Program’s National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances. All projects integrate research, education and/or extension activities. (H) Regional Rural Development Centers; The amount available for support of this program in FY 2017 was $1,899,520 ($474,880 per Center). Four (4) proposals were submitted, reviewed and accepted. Four (4) proposals underwent a Noncompetitive Merit Review by three (3) reviewers with NIFA. All four (4) were recommended to receive funding for “Regional Rural Development Centers” grant. Amounts awarded to the four (4) institutions throughout the United States are: Location #1 Amount: $ 474,880 Location #2 Amount: $ 474,880 Location #3 Amount: $ 474,880 Location #4 Amount: $ 474,880 The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality; (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI); (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers; (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation; and SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program); SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329.
Fiscal Year 2018 Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 – ACTIVE Programs: The total amount available for Fiscal Year 2018 Integrated Activities awards was $8,491,947. (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition; For FY 2018, The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) made four (4) awards that ranged from $375,895 to $499,979. The total amount awarded was approximately $ 1.8 million. The funding rate was 33%. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG): NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI For the FY 2018 award cycle, about $4,748,800 was available for project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs. A total of 53 applications, requesting a total of $25,580,776.00 were received. In July 2018, a 14-member peer review virtual panel evaluated these applications. The peer panel included faculty from land grant universities, researchers from USDA Agricultural Research Service and a non-profit stakeholder group. Funds were available to support a total of 10 new awards. The funding ratio for this program in FY18 was 19%. Funded projects seek to support the development and implementation of research, extension and higher education programs to improve the competitiveness of organic livestock and crop producers, as well as those who are adopting organic practices by studying and documenting environmental services provided by organic farming systems in the area of soil conservation and climate change mitigation, including greenhouse gases. Projects were also funded to develop cultural practices and other allowable alternatives to substances recommended for removal from the National Organic Program’s National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances. All projects integrate research, education and/or extension activities (H) Regional Rural Development Centers; The amount available for support of this program in FY 2018 $1,899,520 ($474,880 per Center). Four proposals were submitted, accepted and reviewed. Four proposals underwent a Noncompetitive Merit Review by three reviewers with NIFA. All four were recommended to receive funding for “Regional Rural Development Centers” grant. Amounts awarded to the four institutions throughout the United States are: Location #1 Amount: $ 474,880 Location #2 Amount: $ 474,880 Location #3 Amount: $ 474,880 Location #4 Amount: $ 474,880 The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality; (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI); (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers; (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation; and SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program); SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329.
Fiscal Year 2019 Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 – ACTIVE Programs: The total amount available for Fiscal Year 2019 Integrated Activities awards was $9,489,271. (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition; For FY 2019, the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) will support five (5) grants, totaling approximately $1.8 million for research to help the discovery and implementation of practical pest management alternatives for commodities and uses affected by methyl bromide phase out. NIFA selected the projects based upon 14 proposals submitted. The funding rate was 35%. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG): NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI For the FY 2019 award cycle, about $5,698,560 was available for project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs. A total of 24 applications, requesting a total of $11,499,813.00 were received. In July 2019, a 13-member peer review virtual panel evaluated these applications. The peer panel included faculty from land grant universities, researchers from USDA Agricultural Research Service and a non-profit stakeholder group. Funds were available to support a total of 11 new awards. The funding ratio for this program in FY19 was 46%. Funded projects seek to support the development and implementation of research, extension and higher education programs to improve the competitiveness of organic livestock and crop producers, as well as those who are adopting organic practices by studying and documenting environmental services provided by organic farming systems in the area of soil conservation and climate change mitigation, including greenhouse gases. Projects were also funded to develop cultural practices and other allowable alternatives to substances recommended for removal from the National Organic Program’s National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances. All projects integrate research, education and/or extension activities (H) Regional Rural Development Centers: NIFA announced the availability of grant funds and requests applications for the Regional Rural Development Centers (RRDC) Competitive Grants Program for fiscal year (FY) 2019 to link the research and educational outreach capacity of the nation's public universities with communities, local decision makers, entrepreneurs, families, and farmers and ranchers to help address a wide range of development issuesfor prosperity for sustainable and secure communities will always be a matter of public interest. RRDC’s leverage land-grant resources in pursuit of USDA’s rural development mission by bringing together the most innovative minds—from inside and outside universities—to address cutting-edge issues without regard to state boundaries. They respond to emerging issues, generate credible science-based information to clarify these issues, and create public-private partnerships to address them. The amount available for support of this program in FY 2019 is $1,899,520 ($474,880 per center). Four proposals were reviewed and recommended for funding. The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality; (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI); (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers; (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation; and SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program); SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329.
Fiscal Year 2020 Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 – ACTIVE Programs: The projected amount available for Fiscal Year 2020 Integrated Activities awards is $1,611,743. (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition; If funding is available for this program in FY 2020, NIFA anticipates supporting similar projects at a similar level of funding. Pertinent information to be provided by Program at a future date. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG): NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI The FY 2020 RFA will focus on the development and implementation of research, extension and higher education programs to improve the competitiveness of organic livestock and crop producers, as well as those who are adopting organic practices. The program will focused on the development and implementation of biologically-based pest management practices that mitigate the ecological, agronomic and economic risks associated with a transition from conventional to organic agricultural production systems. The anticipated total amount (pending approval) for the program will be $6 million. Pertinent information will be provided by Program at a future date. (H) Regional Rural Development Centers; We anticipated the same level of funding for FY 2020 and similar projects will be awarded. The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality; (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI); (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers; (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation; and SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program); SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329.
Authorization
Competitive, Special, and Facilities Research Grant Act, Public Law 89-106, 7 U.S.C. 450i
Section 406 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) (7 U.S.C. 7626), as reauthorized by Section 7306 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) (Public Law 110-246), authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to establish a competitive grants program that provides funding for integrated, multifunctional agricultural research, extension, and education activities. Subject to the availability of appropriations to carry out this program, the Secretary may award grants to colleges and universities [as defined by section 1404 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (NARETPA) (7 U.S.C. 3103)], as amended, on a competitive basis for projects that address priorities in United States agriculture and involve integrated research, education, and extension activities, as determined by the Secretary in consultation with the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board (NAREEEAB). Section 7129 of the FCEA amended section 406(b) of AREERA (7 U.S.C. 7626(b)), adding Hispanic-serving agricultural colleges and universities (HSACUs) as eligible entities for competitive funds awarded under this authority (see Part III.B. of RFA for more information)., 7 U.S.C. 7626
Section 2(c)(1)(B) of Public Law 89–106, as amended., Public Law 89-106, 7 U.S.C. 7626
Title V of the Rural Development Act of 1972, Public Law 92-419, 7 U.S.C. 2204a
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
State agricultural experiment stations, State cooperative extension services, all colleges and universities, other research and extension institutions and organizations, Federal agencies, private organizations or corporations, and individuals to facilitate or expand promising breakthroughs in areas of the food and agricultural sciences of importance to the United States.
Beneficiary Eligibility
State agricultural experiment stations, State cooperative extension services, all colleges and universities, other research and extension institutions and organizations, Federal agencies, private organizations or corporations, and individuals to facilitate or expand promising breakthroughs in areas of the food and agricultural sciences of importance to the United States.
Credentials/Documentation
The System for Award Management (SAM) combines eight federal procurement systems, including CCR, and the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance into one new system. CCR activities are conducted through SAM (the CCR website will redirect users to SAM). Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM): Each applicant (unless excepted under 2 CFR SS 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal awarding agency under 2 CFR SS 25.110(d)) is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) Provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal awarding agency. It also must state that the Federal awarding agency may not make a Federal award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Federal awarding agency is ready to make a Federal award, the Federal awarding agency may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a Federal award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. Applicants must furnish the information required in the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs). Successful applicants recommended for funding must furnish the information and assurances requested during the award documentation process. These include, but are not limited to the following: Organizational Management Information - Specific management information relating to an applicant shall be submitted on a one time basis, with updates on an as needed basis, as part of the responsibility determination prior to the award of a grant identified under this RFA, if such information has not been provided previously under this or another NIFA program. NIFA will provide copies of forms recommended for use in fulfilling these requirements as part of the preaward process. Although an applicant may be eligible based on its status as one of these entities, there are factors which may exclude an applicant from receiving Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits under this program (e.g., debarment or suspension of an individual involved or a determination that an applicant is not responsible based on submitted organizational management information). This information collection is approved under OMB Circular Control No. 0524-0026, "Assurance of Compliance with the Department of Agriculture Regulations Assuring Civil Rights, Compliance and Organization Information." SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transition Organic Transition-Risk Assessment (ORG): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/organic-transitions-org Regional Rural Development Centers: https://nifa.usda.gov/regional-rural-development-centers RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
Preapplication coordination is required. An environmental impact statement is required for this listing. An environmental impact assessment is not required for this listing. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372. All RFAs are published on the Agency’s website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) only accepts electronic applications which are submitted via Grants.gov in response to specific Requests for Applications (RFA). Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. For information about the pre-award phase of the grant lifecycle application processes see: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/learn-grants/grants-101/pre-award-phase.html. Further, applicants must follow the instructions provided in the NIFA Grants.gov Application Guide, which can be assessed as follows: Adobe NIFA Applications. 2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA's Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transition Organic Transition-Risk Assessment (ORG): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/organic-transitions-org Regional Rural Development Centers: https://nifa.usda.gov/regional-rural-development-centers RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Award Procedure
Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA. Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application. Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the Competitive Request for Applications (RFA). 2 CFR 200 - Subpart C and Appendix I and 2 CFR part 400 apply to this Program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transition Organic Transition-Risk Assessment (ORG): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/organic-transitions-org Regional Rural Development Centers: https://nifa.usda.gov/regional-rural-development-centers RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional location, as appropriate for application deadlines
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
From 30 to 60 days. Contact the National Program Leader (NPL), as indicated per CFDA Section # 152 - Headquarters Office regarding dates for specific deadlines, start and end dates, and range of approval/disapproval time. Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. NIFA's respective links regarding general information are provided below: http://nifa.usda.gov/ http://www.grants.gov. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFA is available via: Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transition Organic Transition-Risk Assessment (ORG): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/organic-transitions-org Regional Rural Development Centers: https://nifa.usda.gov/regional-rural-development-centers RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Appeals
Not Applicable. 2 CFR Part 200 - Subparts D & E apply to this program.
Renewals
Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA), which are generally published annually. The most current RFA is available via: Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transition Organic Transition-Risk Assessment (ORG): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/organic-transitions-org Regional Rural Development Centers: https://nifa.usda.gov/regional-rural-development-centers
How are proposals selected?
2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA's Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFAs are available via: Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transition Organic Transition-Risk Assessment (ORG): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/organic-transitions-org Regional Rural Development Centers: https://nifa.usda.gov/regional-rural-development-centers
How may assistance be used?
This research, education, and extension competitive grants program provides funding for integrated, multi-functional agricultural research, extension, and education activities which addresses priorities in United States agriculture. Grant funds must be used for allowable costs necessary to conduct approved integrated research, extension and education objectives to address food and agricultural sciences, in the broadest sense.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
Performance Reports: PERFORMANCE MONITORING: See above for pertinent and specific details.
Auditing
In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, Subpart F-Audit Requirements nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more during the non-Federal entity's fiscal year in Federal awards must have a single or program-specific audit conducted for that year in accordance with the provisions of this part. A non-Federal entity that expends less than $750,000 during the non-Federal entity's fiscal year in Federal awards is exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in SS 200.503. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.
Records
In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, SS 200.333 Retention requirements for records. Grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three (3) year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved. 2 CFR 200 Subpart D applies to this program.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
Statutory formula is not applicable to this assistance listing.

Matching requirements are not applicable to this assistance listing.

MOE requirements are not applicable to this assistance listing.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
Regarding the Critical Issues and Regional Rural Development Centers (Section 2(c)(1)(B) of Public Law 89–106, as amended) , normally, competitive research projects will be supported for periods of up to three (3) years. In accordance with statutory time limits, project periods, including no-cost extensions of time, are not to exceed five (5) years. Further details are provided in the Award document Form NIFA-2009 and the NIFA General Terms and Conditions Grants and Cooperative Agreements (dated October 2016) at: https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transition Organic Transition-Risk Assessment (ORG): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/organic-transitions-org Regional Rural Development Centers: https://nifa.usda.gov/regional-rural-development-centers RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. NIFA utilizes the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP), a secure, web-based electronic payment and information system that allows federal agencies to administer funds. Currently, ASAP is the only payment source for new NIFA grantees.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
NIFA is transitioning to a new location for Fiscal Year 2020. NIFA's New Mailing Address AFTER September 30, 2019 follows: National Institute of Food and Agriculture 6501 Beacon Drive Kansas City, MO 64133 Additional Websites: http://nifa.usda.gov/program/national-water-quality-program http://nifa.usda.gov/program/national-integrated-food-safety-initiative http://nifa.usda.gov/program/integrated-pest-management-program http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/regulating/laws/fqpa/fqpa_implementation.htm http://nifa.usda.gov/resource/integrated-programs-application-information http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transitions http://nifa.usda.gov/program/organic-agriculture-program http://nifa.usda.gov/regional-rural-development-centers
Headquarters Office
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader,
Institute of Bioenergy, Climate and Environment - Division of Environmental Systems, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2210, Washington, District of Columbia, 20250-2210, Telephone: (202) 720-5229, Fax: (202) 720-3945.


ADDITIONAL CONTACTS:

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader; Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition, Division of Food Safety 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2225, Washington, DC 20250-2220; Telephone: (202) 401-1954; Fax: (202) 401-14888;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Production and Sustainability, Division of Animal Systems, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2240, Washington, DC 20250-2220; Telephone: (202) 401-6134; fax: 202-401-1602;

AND

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Family and Consumer Sciences 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Washington, DC 20250-2250; Telephone: (202) 720-4795; fax: 202-720-93662;

Washington , DC 20250-2210 US
Policy@nifa.usda.gov
Phone: (202) 720-5229
Fax: (202) 720-3945
Website Address
http://nifa.usda.gov/grants
Financial Information
Account Identification
12-1502-0-1-352
Obligations
(Project Grants) FY 18$8,491,947.00; FY 19 est $9,489,271.00; FY 20 est $1,611,743.00; FY 17$7,571,059.00; FY 16$6,616,405.00; - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive and/or capacity project grant, or cooperative agreement are established, these amounts will be announced in the annual Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFA is available via: Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/methyl-bromide-transition Organic Transition-Risk Assessment (ORG): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/organic-transitions-org Regional Rural Development Centers: https://nifa.usda.gov/regional-rural-development-centers
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
As an administrator of U.S. government support, NIFA works in partnership with grantees to ensure responsible stewardship of federal funds. Our grantees and partners are required to comply with all relevant rules and regulations. The following resources are provided to NIFA's partners and award recipients to support their adherence to federal regulations governing program performance: NIFA's primary (main) website: https://nifa.usda.gov/regulations-and-guidelines The following represent specific documents and direct links: POLICY GUIDE NIFA's Federal Assistance Policy Guide describes agency policies and procedures. https://nifa.usda.gov/policy-guide CERTIFICATIONS AND REPRESENTATIONS Certifications and representations provided through the NIFA application process. https://nifa.usda.gov/certifications-and-representations ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF USDA SUPPORT BY NIFA When acknowledging USDA support in accordance with 2 CFR Part 415, grantees must use the following acknowledgement for all projects or initiatives supported by NIFA. https://nifa.usda.gov/acknowledgment-usda-support-nifa FEDERAL REGULATIONS The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) lists all regulations published in the Federal Register. https://nifa.usda.gov/federal-regulations FOIA The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) provides that any person has the right to request access to federal documents and information such as research data. https://nifa.usda.gov/foia NEPA POLICY AND GUIDANCE The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Policy and Guidance set the standard for identifying potential environmental impacts. https://nifa.usda.gov/nepa-policy-and-guidance OGFM ISSUED CORRESPONDENCE The Office of Grants and Financial Management occasionally issues correspondence to applicants, grantees, and/or the general public for informational or clarification purposes. https://nifa.usda.gov/ogfm-issued-correspondence RESEARCH MISCONDUCT NIFA requires that all its awardees adhere to the USDA Scientific Integrity Policy and the Federal Policy on Research Misconduct. https://nifa.usda.gov/research-misconduct NIFA'S GENERAL AWARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS Award terms and conditions are determined by statutory, regulatory, and agency requirements, as well as each grant's circumstances. Terms and conditions dictate important items related to your grant, including method of payment, reporting frequency and content, and prior approval requirements. References to the terms and conditions of awards are located on the NIFA 2009 Award Fact Sheet. NIFA's general award terms and conditions (see link below) is applicable to this program, for awards with an award date on December 26, 2014 and thereafter. https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016.
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2016 For Fiscal Year 2016: (A) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program - National Integrated Water Quality Program: No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI): No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers aka Integrated pest Mgmt./Biological Control: No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation: No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program): No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (F) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition (aka MBT): Awards for FY 2016 will be made by September 30, 2016. These awards will support the discovery and implementation of practical pest management alternatives for commodities and uses affected by the methyl bromide phase out. (G) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Organic Transitions(aka ORG): We anticipate making about eight (8) awards in FY 2016 (H) Regional Rural Development Centers: RRDC Review Panel recommended four awards; these will not be announced until the Awards Management Division makes awards. Pertinent data to be provided by Program at a future date. (I) Rapid Responses to Pests & Pathogens (formerly Critical Issues): No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2016: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI): No Action Needed (N/A/N): Program has not been funded for several years. (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers (aka RIPM) aka Integrated pest Mgmt./Biological Control (aka IPM Centers - - NOT RIPM) NOTE: Formerly RIPM - CFDA 10.500 and Research - CFDA 10.200 (funded via Smith-Lever 3 (d) and P.L. 89-106) (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program?) SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition For Fiscal Year (FY) 2016: 1) Biological management of nematode-virus and nematode-fungal complexes in fruit crops. This award for $418,313 will evaluate non-chemical approaches and develop environmentally and economically sustainable approaches to managing root lesion nematodes and BRR in strawberries and dagger nematodes that vector nepoviruses in grapes, blueberries, raspberries and peaches. 2) Refining anaerobic soil disinfestation for disease management in strawberry and apple production. This $497,965 project aims to improve the reliability of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation (ASD) as a non-fumigant alternative to methyl bromide for strawberry production and control of apple replant disease. 3) Improving Efficacy of Aerosol Applications for Control of Stored Product Insects in Wheat and Rice Mills. This research award for $499,999 focuses on improving the distribution and efficacy of aerosol insecticides for control of stored-product insects in food storage and processing facilities. 4) Investigating the Potential of Ethanedinitrile as a Replacement for Soil Fumigation with Methyl Bromide. This award for $ 472,506 will investigate the potential of ethanedinitrile (EDN) as a pre-plant soil fumigant for vegetable production. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG) FDC "51106" NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI - FDC "51300" For Fiscal Year (FY) 2016: 2016-06198: Going underground: Digging up the dirt on Metarhizium-plant-pest interactions in an organic cropping system. This study investigates the effects of cover crops and soil characteristics on the novel interactions among the fungus, Metarhizium, an endemic insect pathogen and plant-protective endophyte with crops and cover crops in an organic agronomic cropping system. Objectives include: 1) characterize Metarhizium isolates from on-going organic research-station and on-farm experiments; 2) determine the ability of endemic isolates to form endophytic relationships with cash crops and selected cover crops; 3) determine effects of endophytic Metarhizium in a model system of corn, black cutworm; and Cochliobolus heterostrophus, the causal agent of southern corn leaf blight; and 4) determine the effect of endophytic Metarhizium on the expression of key defense genes that protect plants from crop pests and diseases. 2016-06180: Decision Support to Quantify GHG Mitigation and Ecosystem Services from Organic Production Systems. This project will address ORG Program Priority by improving technologies and tools to document and optimize the environmental services and climate change mitigation ability of organic farming systems. The team will improve two state-of-the-art decision support systems (COMET-Farm and the Cool Farm Tool) for quantifying the impacts of land use and management practices on soil C and greenhouse gas –GHG- emissions from agricultural systems at the farm-scale. These improved decision support systems will enable the industry to deliver improved storytelling about organic beyond the label and help to identify opportunity areas for working with farmers to improve both productivity and profitability as well as deliver on corporate commitments to meet GHG reduction goals. 2016-06197: Ensuring the best practical use of microbe-containing crop biostimulants/biofertilizers among (transitional)-organic vegetable growers. The long-term goal of this project is to create resources, tangible and human, ensuring the best practical use of Microbe-containing biostimulants and biofertilizers (MC BSs/BFs) among (transitional)-organic vegetable growers. The team will: a) complete stakeholder-focused experiments on farms and research stations, b) expand and strengthen a growing network of farmers and other professionals while evaluating and reporting on product performance, and c) establish, share, and help stakeholders implement core components of practical guidelines for using MC BSs/BFs during (transitional-)organic vegetable production. 2016-06199: The Development of an Organic Crop Budgeting Tool to Help Advise Producers. Budgets are one of the most important tools producers use when deciding on which crops to grow. Objective in this project is to determine the production practices of organic producers, collect price information about the needed inputs, develop a crop budgeting tool, and produce organic crop budgets so that the profitability of organic crops can be estimated for a producer. This contribution is significant because the team is developing a regionalized database of inputs and prices for organic crop production that doesn’t currently exist and integrating this database into an organic crop budgeting tool that will make it significantly easier for producers and Extension personnel to estimate organic profitability. 2016-06181: Developing advanced perennial legume-grass mixtures harvested as stored feeds to improve herd productivity and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in organic dairies in the Northeast. This project will fill knowledge gaps by advancing the scientific understanding about how potential changes in species persistence and forage botanical composition in various legume-grass mixtures across multiple years affect forage quality and stored feed fermentation characteristics and, consequently, milk production and greenhouse gases emissions when fed to organic dairy cows. The team will partner with three organic dairy farmers in the Northeast who will set up demonstration plots and coordinate field days, thus becoming peer leaders in their rural communities. (H) Regional Rural Development Centers For Fiscal Year (FY) 2016: Examples of funded projects are: 1. Location 1: Focused on four priority areas: building a 21st century economy; sustainable communities; leadership development and civic engagement; and community health and wellness. 2. Location 2: Goal is to work as a regional catalyst to strengthen rural communities by sharing scientific discovery and application of sustainable practices with researchers, extension educators, and community development practitioners via conferences, trainings, workshops, and publications. 3. Location 3: Focused on three priority areas: Develop Pathways to Resilient Communities; Build Strategic Partnerships and Mobilize resources around emerging issues and opportunities. Location 4: Focused on four priority areas: Extension,-Community Capacity Building; Entrepreneurship and Job Creation; Local and Regional Foods; Land Use and Balanced Use of Natural Resources; and Mental Health Issues.
Fiscal Year 2017 Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 – ACTIVE Programs: (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition; Projects supported for FY 2017 were: 1. Integration of allyl-isothiocyanate, steam and exothermic compounds for soil disinfestation in strawberry nurseries. This award for $499,749 will develop methyl bromide alternatives through development of fumigant and non-fumigant treatments for strawberry plant nurseries. 2. Integration of food grade coatings into ham nets as a means to control ham mite infestations. The overall goal of this $498,387 project is to determine the technical feasibility, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of infusing propylene glycol based coatings into textile fibers that are used to manufacture ham nets as an alternative to methyl bromide fumigation for controlling mite infestation in dry-cured products. 3. Pyramiding biofumigants and trap crops for eradication of Globodera pallida. This research award for $499,998 is proposed to identify and improve effective biological alternatives for the management of the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida. 4. Evaluation of vacuum and steam heat as a methyl bromide alternative for phytosanitary treatment of hardwood and softwood logs. This research award for $393,049 is proposed to evaluate the efficacy of vacuum and steam heat treatment on thousand canker disease complex and oak wilt in infested logs using a portable log treating unit. In addition, the team proposed the drafting of design concepts for a commercial scale unit. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG); and NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI 2017-03405: Going underground: Perennial and Annual Organic Transition Systems to Optimize Soil Health, Carbon Sequestration, and Profitability Production. Farmers interested in transitioning from conventional to organic systems are faced with unique challenges regarding weed control, fertility, improving soil health, and generating income during the transition period. Many transition systems rely on tillage to control weeds and annual crop rotations, which have been associated with soil carbon (C) loss. Intermediate wheatgrass (IWG) is a cool-season grass that is being bred for increased seed yields to become the first perennial grain crop. IWG could help producers overcome the challenges of organic transition, while also simplifying management, reducing tillage-associated C emissions, and improving soil health relative to annual crop-based organic transitions. This study will compare six organic transition systems that include IWG, summer and winter annuals, perennial legumes, and systems with various combinations of grain, forage, and cover crops. 2017-03371: Facilitating improved environmental and soil quality through increased biodiversity and crop/livestock integration on organic farms. Agricultural systems that restore biodiversity improve sustainability and lower dependence on external inputs, which is vital in organic production. The focus of this project is to investigate the effects of integration of cover crops and livestock grazing on soil quality and crop yield. Results will be utilized in the development of educational programs on organic crops, livestock and soil health through university curriculum development, courses on organic principles and practice, open-source learning modules, and producer outreach. The educational programming will improve understanding of organic principles by students who are both today’s consumers and tomorrow’s farmers and future drivers of agricultural policies and practices. Intermediate and long-term outcomes include producer adoption of practices increasing on-farm biodiversity, leading to greater economic and environmental stability in organic production. 2017-03378: Development of effective biological control of fire blight for the Eastern United States. Fire blight is a devastating disease of apples and pears. The termination of antibiotics in organic production requires alternative management options. Biological control represents an important group of organic management tools. Yet, none of the available biocontrols has provided consistent, high level of control against fire blight under humid climates in the Eastern U.S. This study will perform the first comprehensive search and testing for bacterial and fungal biocontrol strains isolated from apple stigmas under humid climate in Eastern U.S. Using a combined approach of antibiosis screen, crab apple bioassay, and metagenomics, the research team will identify microorganisms with antimicrobial producing abilities and preemptive exclusion properties. 2017-03409: An ecological approach to disease risk management on organic poultry farms. Outdoor poultry are exposed to parasites and pathogens in the soil, or vectored by wild birds. These infections endanger animal and human health. There have been very few holistic studies of factors that make organic poultry farms susceptible or resistant to parasite/pathogen invasion. Growers’ inability to predict and manage these risks forms a major barrier to organic transition. This study will: (1) Measure frequencies of poultry contact with wild birds and soil; (2) Survey pathogen and parasite communities within on-farm wild bird populations, while characterizing transmission routes between wild and domesticated birds; and (3) Characterize properties of soil that affect persistence of fecal-borne poultry parasites and pathogens. 2017-03389: Introducing organic to producers of grain-only and pasture-grain wheat cropping systems of northern Texas. Organic agriculture is nearly absent in the northern Southern Great Plains region of Texas, despite large demand for organic products that could be produced there and low producer incomes. The team proposes to utilize a systems approach to directly compare conventional grain-only and pasture-grain wheat systems to transitional organic systems with management customized to the region. The experiment will occur at a large field scale, which is the only way to provide results directly transferrable to regional stakeholders. We will quantify system management impacts on crop and animal performance; soil microbial properties, nutrient, greenhouse gas emission, and moisture dynamics; and economic outcomes. (H) Regional Rural Development Centers; Examples of funded projects: 1. Focused on the following priority areas within the area: Extension-Community Capacity Building; Workforce Development, Entrepreneurship and Job Creation and Economic Resilience; Local and Regional Foods; Land Use and Balanced Use of Natural Resources; and Issues Related to Behavioral Health in Communities. 2. Focused on the following priorities: (1) Develop Pathways to Resilient Communities; (2) Build Strategic Partnerships; and (3) Mobilize Resources around Emerging Issues and Opportunities. 3. Focused on the following priorities: (1) Building a 21st Century Economy; (2) Sustainable Communities; (3) Leadership Development and Civic Engagement; and (4) Community Health and Wellness. 4. Project goal to strengthen rural communities by sharing and coordinating scientific discovery and application of sustainable practices with researchers, Extension educators and community development practitioners via research, conferences, trainings, workshops, and publications. The overarching goal is to help rural communities prosper, thrive economically, and become self-sustaining. The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality; (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI); (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers; (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation; and SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program); SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329.
Fiscal Year 2018 Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 – ACTIVE Programs: (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition: Projects supported for FY 2018 were: 1. Rapid cycle radio frequency technology for wood packaging materials used in international trade to replace methyl bromide for QPS purposes. This award for $499,979 will expedite broad-scale adoption of radio frequency (RF) technology as a sustainable, economically competitive solution to replace methyl bromide for treatment of wood packaging materials used in international trade, which was recently approved under International Standard of Phytosanitary Measures No. 15 (ISPM-15). 2. IPM for the Ham Mite using Alternatives to Methyl Bromide. This award for $499,713 will develop, test for efficacy and conduct pilot or small scale field trials of tools for integrated pest management (IPM) of southern dry cured hams with a focus on the ham mite. 3. Addressing gaps of current fumigants and advancing non-fumigant IPM solutions to manage soilborne pests in tomato production systems. The overall goal of this $486,842 project is to develop an arsenal of integrated approaches to manage soilborne diseases and weeds for a diverse range of farmers who farm a few to hundreds of acres. 4. Integrated Management of Fusarium Wilt, Nematode and Weed Complex using Methyl Bromide Alternatives in Watermelon Production System. The goal of this $375,695 project is to develop, optimize, and integrate current methyl bromide alternatives with non-fumigant nematicides and pre-plant herbicides to improve Fusarium wilt, root-knot nematode, and nutsedge management in watermelon plasticulture system in Georgia and Florida. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG): NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI 2018-03547: Overcoming barriers to transitioning small ruminants to organic production: Effects of feeding birdsfoot trefoil on parasite control, nutritional status and profitability. In organic production systems, production of small ruminant livestock can be limited by gastrointestinal nematode infections. Forages containing certain tannins have anthelmintic properties, but the majority of research into this area has focused on forages grown in warm climates. The Kotcon research group has shown that birdsfoot trefoil has promise for use as an anthelmintic forage, but additional research will be required to identify birdsfoot trefoil varieties and management practices that will optimize the anthelmintic effect. This project focuses on both animal pathology and agronomic field trials and will include research conducted on various scales, both on- and off-farm. Extensive outreach efforts are planned as part of the project to disseminate relevant findings to producers. 2018-03535: Breaking Down the Barriers to Organic No-Till Soybean and Dry Bean Production Through Improved White Mold Management. White mold is a devastating disease affecting dry edible bean and soybean, as well as other important crops. The Pethybridge team has collected preliminary evidence showing that cultivation of no-till roller-crimped cereal rye can be suppressive of both weeds (another serious problem in organic crop production) and white mold disease. However, the planned future project will further explore the integrated effects of cereal rye cover crops on both weeds and white mold. One concern is that the large amounts of cereal rye residue required for optimal weed suppression may create an environment conducive to white mold infection. Farmer-to-farmer extension activities, as well as on-farm demonstrations are planned as outreach efforts to disseminate results. 2018-03548: Optimization of bacteriophage for management of fireblight disease. Fire blight is a very serious and widespread bacterial disease that infects fruit trees, especially apple trees. Organic options for controlling this disease are limited. This project will explore a novel approach toward controlling this devastating disease. This research will investigate using a bacteriophage for fire blight control, with exploration into formulation and application developments to increase efficacy. Large-scale field testing will ensure applicability of results. Project results will be shared with producers using a variety of outreach and education approaches, including demonstration plots. 2018-03574: Decision support tool to optimize establishment and management of alfalfa as trap crop in organic strawberry productions. In California, annual strawberry production value exceeds $1.8 billion and is equivalent to over 80% of the national production. A complex of Lygus species is a major pest on strawberry, especially in organic productions. Compared to strawberry, alfalfa is a highly preferred host for Lygus. The innovative component of this project is that establishment of an alfalfa-based trap crop at the perimeter of organic strawberry fields is combined with an optimized combination of vacuuming, strip cutting, and releases of natural enemies to suppress Lygus populations in the alfalfa trap. The project focus is to simultaneously optimize: 1) alfalfa-based trap crop establishment (not establish more alfalfa trap crop than is needed, and 2) required management efforts (identify when management is needed and also identify the most feasible and cost-effective combination of vacuuming, strip cutting, and releases of natural enemies). 2018-03523: Manure and Pasture Management to Reduce Swine Parasites in Organic Pastured Pork Production. Managing swine intestinal parasites continues to be an obstacle for organic pig farmers because there is a lack of organically-approved options for controlling parasites. The purpose of this project is to explore manure and pasture management strategies that would control swine parasites by reducing parasite contamination and transmission in organic pig production. Specific objections are to: 1) evaluate parasite pressures on organic pig farms, 2) determine effectiveness of manure composting on eliminating swine parasites and its underlying mechanisms, 3) assess a novel approach to swine parasite control in pastures via biofumigation, and 4) determine effects of grazing rapeseed by organic pigs on reducing swine parasite contamination in pastures. (H) Regional Rural Development Centers: Examples of funded projects: 1. Focused on the following priority areas within the area: Extension-Community Capacity Building; Workforce Development, Entrepreneurship and Job Creation and Economic Resilience; Local and Regional Foods; Land Use and Balanced Use of Natural Resources; and Issues Related to Behavioral Health in Communities 2. Focused on these priorities (1) Develop Pathways to Resilient Communities, (2) Build Strategic Partnerships, and (3) Mobilize Resources around Emerging Issues and Opportunities. 3. Focused on these priorities: 1) Building a 21st Century Economy; 2) Sustainable Communities; 3) Leadership Development and Civic Engagement; and 4) Community Health and Wellness. 4. Project goal to strengthen rural communities by sharing and coordinating scientific discovery and application of sustainable practices with researchers, Extension educators and community development practitioners via research, conferences, trainings, workshops, and publications. The overarching goal is to help rural communities prosper, thrive economically, and become self-sustaining. The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality; (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI); (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers; (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation; and SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program); SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329.
Fiscal Year 2019 Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 – ACTIVE Programs: (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition: The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) anticipates finalizing the competitive awards by September 30, 2019. For the FY 2019 award cycle, NIFA anticipates making awards totaling $1,891,191. The following projects were recommended for funding: 1. In the home stretch: implementation and grower adoption of non-fumigant nematicides in plasticulture. The overall goal of this $234,495 project is to improve grower adoption of non-fumigant nematicides as a component of an integrated pest management strategy in Florida strawberry and vegetables. 2. Evaluating Vacuum And Steam Heat As A Methyl Bromide Alternate Phase II Control Of Pinewood Nematode In Pine And Oak Wilt In White Oak Logs. The overall goal of this $491,725 project is to replace methyl bromide fumigation of exported and imported logs with heat treatment based on steam and vacuum. The benefit of MB treatment replacement with vacuum and steam would apply and extend to both industry and regulators in the international community at large. 3. Ethanedinitrile (EDN) as an alternative fumigant for US log exports. The overall goal of this $500,000 project is to combine research on EDN as a log fumigant, engagement with commercial fumigators to perform experimental trials, and economic analyses that facilitate the use of EDN in place of MB for log exports. The long-term goal is to end or significantly reduce the use of MB for log exports. 4. Site-specific soil pest management using crop rotation and a needs-based variable rate fumigation strategy. The overall goal of this $156,110 integrated research and extension project is to develop efficient control of soilborne pathogens by developing a multi-tactic soilborne disease management plan. 5. Developing Sustainable and Profitable Tools for Producing Tomato in Fields Infested with Soilborne Pathogens, Nematodes, and Weeds. The overall goal of this $508,861 project is to develop sustainable management practices for control of southern root-knot nematode (RKN; Meloidogyne incognita), bacterial wilt (caused by Ralstonia solanacearum), southern blight (caused by Athelia rolfsii), and weeds in tomato production systems in Georgia and South Carolina. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG): NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI 2019-03516: Balancing soil nutrition for sustainable weed and pest-insect management Manure fertilizers bring many benefits for plant and soil health. However, because manure is not composed with an ideal balance of macro/micronutrients for crops, meeting the needs for nitrogen can lead to accumulations of surplus phosphorous. Nutrient imbalances, in turn, may exacerbate weed and insect pest pressure, bringing unexpected and unwelcome management costs to growers. The research proposes to help transitioning organic farmers use fertility inputs to achieve balanced soil nutrition that maximizes profitability and optimizes pest management. 2019-03512: Smart Tillage to Reduce N2O Emission from Organic Agriculture The reliance of grain and forage organic production on tillage, manure and cover crops to control weeds and nutrient supply creates challenges to control nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and nitrogen (N) leaching. Prior research shows that (N2O) emission is high plowing legume cover crops or co-locating them with manure, and revealed that peak N2O emission are from denitrification and driven by hypoxic conditions caused by high respiration rates. The high availability of nitrate that drives denitrification losses also causes leaching. Organic agriculture and agriculture in general must control these harmful N losses. The tea proposes a smart tillage to creatively regulate the distribution and concentration of cover crop residues and manure residues in the plow layer. N2O emissions and N leaching will be controlled under the proposed system. 2019-03522: Intensive annual vs. perennial forage cropping strategies to build soil health and nitrogen efficiency in transitioning tomato systems While the importance of building soil fertility during the organic transition period is well known, this task can be particularly difficult in cropping systems with high nitrogen (N)-demanding crops like tomato. Northern California growers produce 99% of the nation’s organic processing tomatoes, and have expressed a need for information on soil health and N management during the transition period. To fill this need, two 3-year cropping system strategies will be compared: 1) an intensive annual rotation of sudangrass-corn silage-garbanzo with winter cover crops and compost application, and 2) a perennial forage alfalfa+orchardgrass. 2019-03518: Evaluation of integrated bacterial disease management options for organic onion production in southeastern and northcentral United States Center rot has emerged as a chronic problem in number of onion growing regions (conventional and organic) in the United States including Georgia and Michigan, and has been responsible for significant pre and post-harvest losses in yield and quality. The primary emphasis of the proposed project is to advance technologies and outreach to promote the transition to organic onion production in two productive regions, southern and northcentral U.S. This integrated approach focuses on minimizing inoculum sources (weeds, thrips) through microbial control, weed management, and biological control provisioning to form an environmentally sound package for organic onion growers. 2019-03508: Research and Outreach to Support Transitioning to Organic Cotton Production in Central and Gulf Coast Texas The proposal directly addresses the ORG program priority #1: understanding cover crops, reduced or conservation tillage on fertility, ecosystem services, GHG mitigation, weed dynamics. There is a growing consumer and corporate demand for organic cotton and several conventional growers have attempted to transition to organic cotton production to take advantage of the price premiums and demand. However, there are a number of barriers that limit organic cotton production, particularly in the Central and Gulf Coast Texas regions. The goal of this project is to address these barriers through research and outreach activities. (H) Regional Rural Development Centers; RRDC Review Panel recommended four awards; these will not be announced until the Awards Management Division makes awards. The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality; (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI); (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers; (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation; and SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program); SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329.
Fiscal Year 2020 Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 – ACTIVE Programs: (F) Methyl Bromide Transition Program (MBT) Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program-Methyl Bromide Transition: If funding is available for this program in FY 2020, NIFA anticipates supporting similar projects at a similar level of funding. Pertinent information to be provided by Program at a future date. (G) Organic Transition-Risk Assessment aka Organic Transition Program (ORG): NOTE: Also see CFDA 10.307 OREI We projects making approximately 12 awards in 2020. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date. (H) Regional Rural Development Centers: Four awards are projected at the $474,880 amount. The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (A) Water Quality (also Conservation Effects Assessment Projects (CEAP) aka Integrated - Water Quality; (B) National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (aka NIFSI); (C ) (Regional) IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Centers; (D) Crops at Risk from FQPA Implementation; and SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329 (E) FQPA Risk Mitigation Program for Major Food Crop System (aka Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program); SPECIAL NOTE: See CPPM - CFDA # 10.329.