Payments to Agricultural Experiment Stations Under the Hatch Act

 

To support agricultural research at State Agricultural Experiment Stations. Its purpose is to promote efficient production, marketing, distribution, and utilization of products of the farm as essential to the health and welfare of people and to promote a sound prosperous agriculture and rural life. Up to 25 percent (25%) of funds to be used for integrated cooperative research and extension activities.
TWO (2) PROGRAMS ARE FUNDED UNDER CFDA 10.203. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES ARE AS FOLLOWS:
(A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)
The Hatch Act of 1887 provides the basis for Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas.
State Agricultural Experiment Stations are eligible for funds appropriated under this Act according to the following formula: The previous year’s base plus the current year increase as follows:
Three percent (3%) for Federal Administration,
Twenty percent (20%) equally,
Twenty-six percent (26%) in an amount which bears the same ratio to the total amount to be allotted as the rural population of the State bears to the total rural population of all the States as determined by the last preceding decennial census;
Twenty-six percent (26%) t in an amount which bears the same ratio to the total amount to be allotted as the farm population of the State bears to the total farm population of all the States as determined by the last preceding decennial census. Twenty-five percent (25%) for the Hatch Multistate Research Fund.
(B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
Not less than twenty-five percent (25%) of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one (1) State. These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
10.203
Federal Agency/Office
Agency: Department of Agriculture
Office: National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
FORMULA GRANTS
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2013: (A) - The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)
For the FY 2013 award cycle, $165,650,537 was appropriated for awards to the 51 1862 state land-grant universities and six land-grants in insular areas.

There are 7170 active Hatch research projects currently reporting in the Current Research Information System (CRIS) or REEport systems. Those projects are described as plans of work for a five-year period and roughly 20% of the total number of projects are new each year. Projects are reviewed internally at the host institution and again by national program staff at NIFA. Projects report progress in the CRIS system.

Projects may span the spectrum of research affecting all aspects of agriculture, including soil and water conservation and use; plant and animal production, protection, and health; processing, distribution, safety, marketing, and utilization of food and agricultural products; forestry, including range management and range products; multiple use of forest rangelands, and urban forestry; aquaculture; home economics and family life; human nutrition; rural and community development; sustainable agriculture; molecular biology; and biotechnology. Research may be conducted on problems of local, State, regional, or national concern

(B) - The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
The Hatch Act of 1887 provides Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas.
Not less than 25 percent of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one State. These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. A matching fund requirement exists for this Formula Grant Opportunity.
For the FY 2013 Formula Grant Opportunity, $50,321,528 was available for project grant awards.
NIFA received a total of 57 applications requesting a total of $50,321,528 in FY 2013.
The funding ratio for this program in FY 2013 was 100%.

Funded projects addressed multistate agricultural research projects. See Hatch Act research scope description in section 160 below. Fiscal Year 2014: (A) - The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)
For the FY 2014 award cycle, $183,791,586 was appropriated for awards to the 51 1862 state land-grant universities and six land-grants in insular areas.

There are 7166 active Hatch research projects currently reporting in the Current Research Information System (CRIS) or REEport systems. Those projects are described as plans of work for a five-year period and roughly 20% of the total number of projects are new each year. Projects are reviewed internally at the host institution and again by national program staff at NIFA. Projects report progress in the CRIS system.

Projects may span the spectrum of research affecting all aspects of agriculture, including soil and water conservation and use; plant and animal production, protection, and health; processing, distribution, safety, marketing, and utilization of food and agricultural products; forestry, including range management and range products; multiple use of forest rangelands, and urban forestry; aquaculture; home economics and family life; human nutrition; rural and community development; sustainable agriculture; molecular biology; and biotechnology. Research may be conducted on problems of local, State, regional, or national concern.

(B) - The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)

The Hatch Act of 1887 provides Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas.

Not less than 25 percent of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one State. These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. A matching fund requirement exists for this Formula Grant Opportunity.

For the FY 2014 Formula Grant Opportunity, NIFA expects a similar level of funding and similar number of Formula Grant Opportunity proposals as in FY 2013.

Funded projects should address multistate agricultural research projects. See Hatch Act research scope description funding in section 160. Fiscal Year 2015: (A) - The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)
No data available. To be provided by Program at a future date.

(B) - The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
The Hatch Act of 1887 provides Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas.
Not less than 25 percent of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one State. These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. A matching fund requirement exists for this Formula Grant Opportunity.
For the FY 2015 Formula Grant Opportunity, NIFA expects a similar level of funding and similar number of Formula Grant Opportunity proposals as in FY 2014.
Funded projects should address multistate agricultural research projects. See Hatch Act research scope description funding in section 160 below.
Authorization
Hatch Act of 1887, as amended; Public Law 84-352, 7 U.S.C. 361a-361i; Education Amendments of 1972, Section 506, Public Law 92-318; Public Law 93-471; Public Law 95-113; Education Amendments of 1980, Section 1361, Public Law 96-374, 7 U.S.C. 301; Public Law 97-98; Public Law 99-198; Public Law 101-624; Public Law 104-127; Public Law 105-185.
, 7 U.S.C 361a-i.
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
(A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)
Hatch Act funds are provided for agricultural research on an annual basis to the State Agricultural Experiment Stations (SAES’s) which were established under the direction of the college or university or agricultural departments of the college or university in each State in accordance with the act approved July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301 et seq.); or such other substantially equivalent arrangements as any State shall determine.
Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project.
(B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
Hatch Act funds are provided for agricultural research on an annual basis to the State Agricultural Experiment Stations (SAES’s) which were established under the direction of the college or university or agricultural departments of the college or university in each State in accordance with the act approved July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301 et seq.); or such other substantially equivalent arrangements as any State shall determine.
Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project.
Beneficiary Eligibility
Funds under the Hatch Act are allocated in accordance with the statutory formula stated in the Act to the State agricultural experiment stations of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Micronesia, and Northern Mariana Islands. These institutions have been identified and declared eligible by their respective State legislatures.
Credentials/Documentation
No Credentials or documentation are required. OMB Circular No. A-87 applies to this program.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
All Formula Grant Opportunities (FGOs) are published on the Agency’s website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. Please see the following Grants.gov link for more information: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to the Hatch as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. As noted previously, these application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system and the Current Research Information System (CRIS), and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.
Section 202 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require approved plans of work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1862 Land-Grant Institution must submit both a 5-Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted each year as an update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due by April 1.
Specific project details and pertinent information should be entered in the Current Research Information System (CRIS) as in prior years. CRIS is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's documentation and reporting system for ongoing agricultural, food and nutrition, and forestry research and education. CRIS contains over 30,000 descriptions of current, publicly-supported research and education activities. This work is sponsored or conducted by the USDA research agencies, the State agricultural experiment stations, the State Land-Grant Institutions and universities, State schools of forestry, cooperating schools of veterinary medicine, and USDA grant recipients. See Part VI.C. of the Formula Grant Opportunity (FGO) for specific CRIS requirements. An environmental impact statement is required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Application Procedure
OMB Circular No. A-102 applies to this program. OMB Circular No. A-110 applies to this program. State Five (5) year plans of work must be submitted to and approved by NIFA before funds are released. Applications should be submitted as outlined in the FGO. Applications must follow the instructions provided per Grants.Gov. Applicants are required to submit applications in response to both an interim FGO and a final FGO. The final FGO reflects the final formula allocations for the current fiscal year (FY).
Award Procedure
The Office of Planning and Accountability and CRIS Office will notify the OEP Financial Operations Branch regarding each institution’s compliance with the Plan of Work reporting requirements [i.e., Five (5) Year Plan of Work Update and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results]. If all current program and administrative requirements have been met by the eligible institution, funding will continue to be released on a quarterly basis. The OEP Financial Operations Branch will notify the institutions when all requirements have been met or approved.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
From 30 to 60 days. Section :094 - Deadlines:
Dates for specific deadlines are announced in the FGO each fiscal year (FY).
Appeals
Not Applicable.
Renewals
Not applicable, each year of funding is awarded as a new grant.
How are proposals selected?
Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Formula Grant Opportunity (FGO).
How may assistance be used?
USES:
Money appropriated pursuant to this Act shall also be available, in addition to meeting expenses for research and investigations conducted under authority of Section 2, for printing and disseminating the results of such research, retirement of employees subject to the provisions of an Act approved March 4, 1940 (54 Stat. 39), administrative planning and direction, and for the purchase and rental of land and the construction, acquisition, alteration, or repair of buildings necessary for conducting research. The State Agricultural Experiment Stations are authorized to plan and conduct any research authorized under Section 2 of this Act in cooperation with each other and such other agencies and individuals as may contribute to the solution of the agricultural problems involved, and moneys appropriated pursuant to this Act shall be available for paying the necessary expenses of planning, coordinating, and conducting such cooperative research. Up to twenty-five percent (25%) of funds to be used for integrated cooperative research and extension activities.
(A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)
This grant is used to support continuing agricultural research at institutions eligible to receive funds under the Act approved July 2, 1862 (12 Stat. 503, as amended) (“1862 Land-Grant Institutions”), as well as State agricultural experiment stations. Funds appropriated under this section shall be used to conduct original and other researches, investigations, and experiments bearing directly on and contributing to the establishment and maintenance of a permanent and effective agricultural industry of the United States, including researches basic to the problems of agriculture in its broadest aspects, and such investigations as have for their purpose the development and improvement of the rural home and rural life and the maximum contribution by agriculture to the welfare of the consumer, as may be deemed advisable, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of the respective States. Further, funds may be used printing and disseminating the results of such research, retirement of employees subject to the provisions of an Act approved March 4, 1940 (54 Stat. 39), administrative planning and direction, and for the purchase and rental of land and the construction, acquisition, alteration, or repair of buildings necessary for conducting research.
(B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
In addition to the uses applicable to the Regular Research funds, Multistate Research funds must be used for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one (1) State.
These funds are known as the Hatch Multistate Research Fund (MRF). RESTRICTIONS:
(A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)
(1) Approved NIFA Hatch Projects
Hatch Federal funding must be used on approved Hatch projects including Hatch Multistate Research Fund (MRF) projects.
(2) Matching
Section 3(d)(1) of the Hatch Act of 1887 (7 U.S.C. 361c(d)(1)) states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for agricultural research and for the establishment and maintenance of facilities for the performance of the research.” However, section 3(d)(4) of the Hatch Act of 1887 ( 7 U.S.C. 361c(d)(4)) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year (FY) 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirement of paragraph (1), the insular areas of American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Mariana Islands, and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than fifty percent (50%) of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section. The Secretary may waive the matching fund requirement [of fifty percent (50%)] for any fiscal year (FY) if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year (FY).”
Section 7403 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 amended section 3(d)(4) of the Hatch Act to subject the District of Columbia to the same matching requirements as the insular 1862 Land-Grant Institutions upon enactment (May 22, 2008).
NIFA may consider and approve matching waivers submitted by State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the Insular Areas and the District of Columbia.
(3) Indirect Costs and Tuition Remission
In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as Hatch formula grant expenditures.
(B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
(1) Approved NIFA Hatch MRF Projects
Hatch MRF Federal funding must be used on approved Hatch MRF projects.
(2) Matching
Section 3(d)(1) of the Hatch Act of 1887 (7 U.S.C. 361c(d)(1)) states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for agricultural research and for the establishment and maintenance of facilities for the performance of the research.” However, section 3(d)(4) of the Hatch Act of 1887 ( 7 U.S.C. 361c(d)(4)) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year (FY) 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirement of paragraph (1), the insular areas of American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Mariana Islands, and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than fifty percent (50%) of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section. ... The Secretary may waive the matching fund requirement [of fifty percent (50%)] for any fiscal year (FY)if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year (FY).”
Section 7403 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 amended section 3(d)(4) of the Hatch Act to subject the District of Columbia to the same matching requirements as the insular 1862 Land-Grant Institutions upon enactment (May 22, 2008).
NIFA may consider and approve matching waivers submitted by State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the Insular Areas and the District of Columbia.
(3) Indirect Costs and Tuition Remission
In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as Hatch MRF formula grant expenditures.
Section 3(d)(1) of the Hatch Act of 1887 (7 U.S.C. 361c(d)(1))states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for agricultural research and for the establishment and maintenance of facilities for the performance of the research.” However, section 3(d)(4) of the Hatch Act of 1887 ( 7 U.S.C. 361c(d)(4)) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year (FY) 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirement of paragraph (1), the insular areas of American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Mariana Islands, and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than fifty percent (50%) of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section. ... The Secretary may waive the matching fund requirement [of fifty percent (50%)] for any fiscal year (FY) if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year (FY).”
Section 7403 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 amended section 3(d)(4) of the Hatch Act to subject the District of Columbia to the same matching requirements as the insular 1862 Land-Grant Institutions upon enactment (May 22, 2008).
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Institutions are expected to submit an annual Program of Research, a listing of all approved Hatch projects for said institution. Institutions must submit a Form AD-416, Work Unit Description; Form AD-417, Project Classification; NIFA-2008, Assurance Form; and Project Proposal through the Current Research Information System prior to the initiation of each Hatch project. The project must undergo a review process and be approved before it is incorporated into the Program of Research. Each institution shall submit a CRIS Form AD-421, Accomplishments Report, annually for each eligible project. Reports from institutions reporting on a calendar year shall be submitted by April 1 for the preceding calendar year. Reports from institutions reporting on a fiscal year (FY) shall be submitted by February 1 for the preceding fiscal year (FY). An Accomplishments Report, CRIS Form AD-421, shall be submitted to NIFA for each completed or terminated project. Such reports shall be submitted at the same time as are progress reports on active projects and should include a brief summary of accomplishments for the entire life of the project. A CRIS Form AD-419, Funding and Staff Support Report, shall be submitted to NIFA annually for all projects. CRIS Form AD-419 reports are also required for expenditures on all State projects that are to be included in the non-Federal funds and matching funds computation. Reports shall be made on a fiscal year (FY) basis and are to be submitted by February 1. Section 202 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require approved plans of work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1862 Land-Grant Institution must submit both a Five (5) Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted each year as an update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due by April 1. NIFA uses the SF-425, Federal Financial Report to monitor cash. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Section 202 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require approved plans of work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1862 Land-Grant Institution must submit both a Five (5) Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted each year as an update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due by April 1. Institutions are required to submit the SF-425, Federal Financial Report per Agency instructions. The office listed below provides agency oversight of these reports:

Formula Grant Branch
Awards Management Division
Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM)
National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
STOP 2298
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20250-2298
Telephone: (202) 401-6520
Fax: (202) 690-3002
E-mail: formulagrantquestions@nifa.usda.gov. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Section 202 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require approved plans of work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1862 Land-Grant Institution must submit both a Five (5) Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted each year as an update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due by April 1.
Auditing
In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-133 (Revised, June 27, 2003), "Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations," nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $500,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. Audits will be conducted in accordance with guidelines established in the revised OMB Circular No. A-133 and implemented in 7 CFR 3052. This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.
Records
In accordance with the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and other Non-profit Organizations [2 CFR 215, Subpart C, Section 215.53, (OMB Circular A-110)] grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three-year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
Statutory Formula: Title The Hatch Act of 1887, Public Law 084-352. 7 U.S.C. 361c(d)(1)
Formula: Payments to States for fiscal year (FY) 1955 was a fixed base and sums appropriated in excess of 1955 level use the following fund allocation statistical factors:
(1) Twenty percent (20%) allotted equally to each State;
(2) Not less than Fifty-two percent (52%) to States as follows: One-half (1/2) in an amount which bears the same ratio as the rural population of the State bears to the total rural population of all the States (and the source is the 1990 Decennial Census); and one-half (1/2) in an amount which bears the same ratio as the farm population of the State bears to the total farm population of all the States (and the source is the 1990 Decennial Census); and
(3) At least Twenty-five percent (25%) to States for cooperative research in which two (2) or more State agricultural experiment stations are cooperating to solve problems of agriculture in more than one (1) State.
Matching Requirements: Percent: 100.%. (A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research) (B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
100 percent. However, the state agricultural experiment stations in the District of Columbia and the insular areas shall provide non-Federal matching funds equal to not less than 50% of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary of Agriculture. This requirement may be waived by the Secretary.
(B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
Required Multistate Match amounts are disclosed in FGO.
MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
Hatch funds are expected to be fully expended in the fiscal year (FY) of appropriation; however, funds may be carried over for up to one (1) year after the end of the year for which they were appropriated. No prior approval is required to carry over funds for one (1) additional year; however, no additional carryover requests may be considered or approved, as no legislative authority to do so is provided. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: quarterly.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
None.
Headquarters Office
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Production and Sustainablity, Division of Plant Systems-Protection, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2240 , Washington , District of Columbia 20250-2240 Phone: (202) 401-4939 Fax: (202) 401-1782
Website Address
http://www.nifa.usda.gov/
Financial Information
Account Identification
12-1500-0-1-352.
Obligations
(Formula Grants (Apportionments)) FY 13 $205,663,302; FY 14 est $229,172,565; and FY 15 est $228,935,940 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years.

Multi-state allocations represent 25% of all increases above the FY 1955 base year.

NOTE: FY 2013 estimated amounts include dollar reductions calculated pursuant to the budget sequestration order issued March 1, 2013.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
If minimum or maximum amounts of funding are established, these will be announced in the Initial and/or Final Formula Grant Opportunity (FGO). See Appendix A of the Formula Grant Opportunity (FGO) for the specific allocation.
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
Administrative Manual for the Hatch (Experiment Station) Act as amended, Agricultural Handbook No. 381 revised November 1980; Manual for Cooperative Regional Research, revised 1986; 7 CFR Part 3015, USDA Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations; 7 CFR part 3017, Government wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) and Government wide Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Grants); 7 CFR Part 3018, New Restrictions on Lobbying; and 7 CFR Part 3019, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Nonprofit Organizations.
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2013: (A) –The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)

Example 1: Forage utilization and nitrogen metabolism by ruminants.
The primary purpose of this research program is to increase the long-term economic and environmental sustainability of ruminant production by increasing the efficiency of forage utilization and supplementation, while training future industry leaders in ruminant nutrition and beef management with an emphasis on forage utilization.
Objectives: 1) Increase the sustainability and economic viability of ruminant production by increasing the utilization of available forage resources, while reducing the environmental footprint (i.e., the environmental cost associated) of ruminant production. 2) Achieve a greater understanding of whole-animal and ruminal nutrient utilization when forages make up the majority of the diet. 3) Provide training to graduate and undergraduate students in ruminant nutrition research, forage production, and grazing management of ruminant species to serve as future leaders in ruminant production and forage utilization.

Example 2: Microbial processes for bioproducts and biofuels production.
This project concerns measurement and prediction of properties such as vapor pressure, surface tension and cold flow behavior to facilitate blending and increased adoption of biofuels. Another thrust focuses specifically on measurement and correlation of vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid solubilities for mixtures related to the succinic acid platform, to facilitate development of bioderived chemicals from succinic acid.
Objectives: 1) Mechanize the fungi used to generate the enzymes used for energy conversion. 2) Increase fat accumulation in plants to be used for biofuels. 3) Develop transgenic strains of algae for biofuels.

Example 3: Improved application of pest control substances with a new droplet size monitoring system.
This project intends to reduce the risk of toxic agricultural chemicals in the field while improving pest control.
Objectives: The primary objective of this project is to improve the efficiency of the (liquid) agricultural chemical application systems. Especially, we propose to develop the real-time droplet size monitoring system for low-pressure field sprayers.

Example 4: Economic issues in agricultural pollination
This project is examining the economics of pollination markets and ecosystem services. North America is the largest example of an active market in pollination services anywhere in the world. In light of the current pollination crisis the void of economic information needs to be closed. This study will begin to close the gap.
Objectives: To understand empirically the dependence of market prices for pollination services on crop and other market factors. To assess the economic importance of various threats facing the agricultural pollination industry, among them Colony Collapse Disorder. To understand the potential supply response from the solitary pollinator (non-Apis) segment of the pollination industry.


(B) –The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
1) This project will research flies impacting livestock, poultry, and food safety. The research will: characterize dispersal and population biology of stable flies and house flies, and develop monitoring methods for use in indoor and outdoor environments; establish extent of fly-borne dispersal of human and animal pathogens; and improve management tactics for stable flies and house flies.
2) This project addresses the adaptation, quality, and management of sustainable cellulosic biofuel. The research will: compare cropping systems such as annual, perennial, cool-season, and warm-season cellulosic crops and combinations with oil seed crops for biofuel potential in representative environments of the western region; measure biomass feedstock production, energy conservation, and economics with various management treatments at diverse locations in the region; determine production and economic sustainability and carbon sequestration of dedicated biofuel feedstocks; develop regional based bioenergy and transitional grants to expand resources; and explore regional private-public partnerships with the emerging biorefinery industry.
3) This project focuses on integrated management of Russian wheat aphid and other cereal arthropod pests. The project will: develop integrated management strategies for cereal aphid and other arthropod pests in small grains to improve economic viability of small-grain cropping systems while maintaining environmental quality and facilitate research into improved integrated pest management approaches at the field and landscape level to manage cereal arthropod pests.
4) This project researches reproductive performance in domestic ruminants. The project will discover and translate molecular, metabolic, genomic, endocrine, and immunologic mechanisms that influence testicular and ovarian function, reproductive behavior, conception rate, embryo and fetal development, attainment of puberty, and effects of climate/season on reproductive patterns of domestic ruminants.
5) This project addresses the assessment of the carbon sequestration potential of common agricultural systems on benchmark soils. The project will: evaluate the effects of land use, crop rotation, tillage practice, soil texture, and ecosystem age/rotation duration on soil carbon concentration, content, and sequestration and related soil physical and chemical properties; quantify and understand the physical and chemical processes that relate to and control soil carbon sequestration; and investigate spatial variability issues associated with soil carbon content and sequestration. Fiscal Year 2014: (A) –The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)

No data available. Specific details will be provided by Program Unit at a future date.

(B) –The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)

1) This project seeks to enhance economically and environmentally sustainable practices in temperate fruit production by focusing on rootstocks and root systems. Specifically, this project addresses high priorities within the crosscutting research areas of agricultural production, processing, and distribution, genetic resource development and manipulation, integrated pest management and economic development and policy.
2) This project will serve to further analyze and understand the results and potential of agriculture of the middle type values-based supply chains. This new effort will both re-examine the existing research studies from new perspectives and add additional baseline projects. Examples of the new issues to be explored are the implications of these values-based supply chains on the distribution of decision-making within the food system, the management of rural landscapes and natural resources, the well-being of rural communities, and the impact of public and private sector policies.
3) This project addresses the improvement of human health, nutrition, and wellness of the US population. The project addresses this challenge directly by focusing on the role of dietary n-3 fatty acids on numerous health conditions and translating information on n-3 fatty acids to the public. Two crosscutting objectives are: (1) Emphasize research that expands our understanding of the relationship between diet, health and disease prevention with particular focus on antioxidants, dietary lipids, functional foods/nutraceuticals, nutrient bioavailability, nutrient regulation of gene expression and nutrition and physical activity, and (2) Design effective nutrition education programs and delivery methods that modify human behavior such that individuals including those most at risk (pregnant women, infants, adolescents and the elderly) choose healthier diets.

(4) This project will focus on understanding and improving the response of photosynthesis to developmental and environmental factors that limit productivity. The research spans all levels of organization from the molecular and cellular through the leaf, whole plant and canopy levels. Particular emphasis will be placed on abiotic stresses (i.e., heat, cold, drought and salinity), nitrogen and water use efficiency, and the signaling pathways that initiate the plant response.
(5) This project will generate necessary data on established and invasive soybean pest densities, distributions and biology that are critical to improve overall national soybean IPM programs. A focus on soybean aphids will continue, but invasive stink bugs, plataspids and insecticide-resistant Lepidoptera will receive more attention. The project will continue to focus on maintaining a sustainable soybean IPM program where sustainability is defined as pursuing maximal profitability in the short-term without sacrificing the potential for long-term stability of the system. We will continue our focus on utilizing a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical tools to regulate pest populations while minimizing environmental risks. Fiscal Year 2015: (A) –The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research)

No data available. Specific details will be provided by Program Unit at a future date.

(B) –The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research)
No data available. Specific details will be provided by Program Unit at a future date.