Payments to Agricultural Experiment Stations Under the Hatch Act

 

To support agricultural research at State Agricultural Experiment Stations. Its purpose is to promote efficient production, marketing, distribution, and utilization of products of the farm as essential to the health and welfare of people and to promote a sound prosperous agriculture and rural life. Up to 25 percent (25%) of funds to be used for integrated cooperative research and extension activities. Two (2) Programs are funded under CFDA 10.203. Specific Objectives are as follows: (A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research) The Hatch Act of 1887 provides the basis for Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas. State Agricultural Experiment Stations are eligible for funds appropriated under this Act according to the following formula: The previous year?s base plus the current year increase as follows: Three percent (3%) for Federal Administration, Twenty percent (20%) equally, Twenty-six percent (26%) in an amount which bears the same ratio to the total amount to be allotted as the rural population of the State bears to the total rural population of all the States as determined by the last preceding decennial census; Twenty-six percent (26%) t in an amount which bears the same ratio to the total amount to be allotted as the farm population of the State bears to the total farm population of all the States as determined by the last preceding decennial census. Twenty-five percent (25%) for the Hatch Multistate Research Fund. (B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research) Not less than twenty-five percent (25%) of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one (1) State. These funds are designated as the ??Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.? Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. The 25 percent applies to any amounts appropriated above the level of funding in 1955 (the base year).

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
10.203
Federal Agency/Office
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of Agriculture
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
A - Formula Grants
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2016 For Fiscal Year 2016: (A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research): For the FY 2016 award cycle, the “Payment to States” amount was $172,423,744 for awards to the 51 1862 state land-grant universities and six land-grants in insular areas. There are 5,667 active Hatch Regular research projects currently reporting in the REEport systems. All Hatch projects are described as plans of work for a five-year period and roughly 20% of the total number of Hatch projects, about 1,000, are new each year. Projects are reviewed internally at the host institution for scientific merit and again by national program staff at NIFA for program compliance. Projects report progress through the REEport interface and are publically displayed through the CRIS system. (B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research Fund): The Hatch Act of 1887 provides Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas. Not less than 25 percent of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one State. The 25 percent applies to any amounts appropriated above the level of funding in 1955 (the base year). These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. A matching fund requirement exists for this Capacity Grant Program (formerly known as Formula Grant Opportunity). For FY 2016, $ 56,263,470 was available for grant awards. NIFA received a total of 57 applications requesting a total of $56,263,470 in FY 2016. The funding ratio for this program in FY 2016 was 100%. Funded projects addressed multistate agricultural research projects. See Hatch Act research scope description in section # 170 – Examples of Funded Projects below. (A) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2016 – HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 award cycle, $172,423,744 was appropriated for awards to the fifty-one (51) 1862 state land-grant universities and six (6) land-grants in insular areas. There were 5,667 active Hatch Regular research projects associated with the Hatch Act appropriation reporting in the REEport systems. All Hatch projects are described as plans of work for a five-year period and roughly 20% of the total number of Hatch projects, about 1,000, are new each year. Projects are reviewed internally at the host institution for scientific merit and again by national program staff at NIFA for program compliance. Projects report progress through the REEport interface and are publically displayed through the CRIS system. Projects may span the spectrum of research affecting all aspects of agriculture, including: (1) soil and water conservation and use; (2) plant and animal production, protection, and health; (3) processing, distribution, safety, marketing, and utilization of food and agricultural products; (4) forestry, including range management and range products; (5) multiple use of forest rangelands, and urban forestry; (6) aquaculture; (7) home economics and family life; (8) human nutrition; (9) rural and community development; (10) sustainable agriculture; (11) molecular biology; and (12) biotechnology. Research may be conducted on problems of local, State, regional, or national concern. (B) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2016 – HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: The Hatch Act of 1887 provides Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas. Not less than 25 percent of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one (1) State. These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. A matching fund requirement exists for this Capacity Grant Program (formerly known as Formula Grant Opportunity). For the FY 2016 Capacity Grant (formerly known as Formula Grant Opportunity), $59,909,414 was available for project grant awards. NIFA received a total of 57 applications requesting a total of $59,909,414 in FY 2016.
Fiscal Year 2017 Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: In Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, the amount appropriated for this Program was $243,701,000. The amount available for awards was $228,105,022, after legislatively mandated set-asides. (A) HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 award cycle, $172,423,744 was appropriated for awards to the 51 1862 state land-grant universities and six (6) land-grants in insular areas. There were 4,712 active Hatch Regular research projects associated with the Hatch Act appropriation reporting in the REEport systems. All Hatch projects are described as plans of work for a five-year period and roughly 20% of the total number of Hatch projects, about 1,000, are new each year. Projects are reviewed internally at the host institution for scientific merit and again by national program staff at NIFA for program compliance. Projects report progress through the REEport interface and are publically displayed through the CRIS system. Projects may span the spectrum of research affecting all aspects of agriculture, including: (1) soil and water conservation and use; (2) plant and animal production, protection, and health; (3) processing, distribution, safety, marketing, and utilization of food and agricultural products; (4) forestry, including range management and range products; (5) multiple use of forest rangelands, and urban forestry; (6) aquaculture; (7) home economics and family life; (8) human nutrition; (9) rural and community development; (10) sustainable agriculture; (11) molecular biology; and (12) biotechnology. Research may be conducted on problems of local, State, regional, or national concern. (B) HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: The Hatch Act of 1887 provides Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas. Not less than 25 percent (25%) of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one State. These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. A matching fund requirement exists for this Capacity Grant Program. For the FY 2017 Capacity Request for Applications (RFA), $56,120,901 was available for project grant awards. NIFA received a total of 57 applications requesting a total of $56,120,901 in FY 2017. The funding ratio for this program in FY 2017 was 100%.
Fiscal Year 2018 Fiscal Year (FY) 2018: (A) HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 award cycle, $172,705,011 was the amount available for awards to the 51 1862 state land-grant universities and six (6) land-grants in insular areas. There were 5,874 active Hatch Regular research projects associated with the Hatch Act appropriation reporting in the REEport systems. All Hatch projects are described as plans of work for a five-year period, and roughly 20% of the total number of Hatch projects, about 1,000, are new each year. Projects are reviewed internally at the host institution for scientific merit and again by national program staff at NIFA for program compliance. Projects report progress through the REEport interface and are publicly displayed through the CRIS system. Projects may span the spectrum of research affecting all aspects of agriculture, including: (1) soil and water conservation and use; (2) plant and animal production, protection, and health; (3) processing, distribution, safety, marketing, and utilization of food and agricultural products; (4) forestry, including range management and range products; (5) multiple use of forest rangelands, and urban forestry; (6) aquaculture; (7) home economics and family life; (8) human nutrition; (9) rural and community development; (10) sustainable agriculture; (11) molecular biology; and (12) biotechnology. Research may be conducted on problems of local, State, regional, or national concern. (B) HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: The Hatch Act of 1887 provides Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas. Not less than 25 percent (25%) of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one State. These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. A matching fund requirement exists for this Capacity Grant Program. For the FY 2018 Request for Applications (RFA), $56,348,551 was available for project grant awards. The funding ratio for this program in FY 2018 was 100%.
Fiscal Year 2019 Fiscal Year (FY) 2019: (A) HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 award cycle, $183,367,803 was available for awards to the 51 1862 state land-grant universities and six land-grants in insular areas. There are 4,513 active Hatch Regular research projects currently reporting in the REEport systems. All Hatch projects are described as plans of work for a five-year period and roughly 20% of the total number of Hatch projects, about 1,000, are new each year. Projects are reviewed internally at the host institution for scientific merit and again by national program staff at NIFA for program compliance. Projects report progress through the REEport interface and are publicly displayed through the CRIS system. (B) HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: The Hatch Act of 1887 provides Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas. Not less than 25 percent (25%) of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one State. These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. A matching fund requirement exists for this Capacity Grant Program. For the FY 2019 Request for Applications (RFA), $60,050,909 was available for project grant awards. NIFA received a total of 57 applications requesting a total of $60,050,909 in FY 2019. The funding ratio for this program in FY 2019 was 100%.
Fiscal Year 2020 Fiscal Year (FY) 2020: (A) HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: Based upon the President’s Budget, for the FY 2020 award cycle, the projected amount available for awards will be $172,382,319. NIFA projects making awards for the 51 1862 state land-grant universities and six land-grants in insular areas. We project that there will be approximately 5,000 active projects, of which about 1,000 will be new in FY 2020. (B) HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: The Hatch Act of 1887 provides Federal funding for agricultural research activities at the State Agricultural Experiment Stations in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Insular Areas. Not less than 25 percent (25%) of the total Hatch Act of 1887 funding is allotted to the States for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one State. These funds are designated as the ‘‘Multistate Research Fund, State Agricultural Experiment Stations.” Funds are allocated on a prorata basis and allocations are adjusted to support national and regional projects. These projects and their associated budgets are reviewed and approved annually. A matching fund requirement exists for this Capacity Grant Program. For the FY 2020 Capacity Request for Applications (RFAs), NIFA projects that a similar level of funding and similar number of proposals as in FY 2019. Funded projects should address multistate agricultural research projects.
Authorization
Hatch Act of 1887, as amended; Public Law 84-352, 7 U.S.C. 361a-361i; Education Amendments of 1972, Section 506, Public Law 92-318; Public Law 93-471; Public Law 95-113; Education Amendments of 1980, Section 1361, Public Law 96-374, 7 U.S.C. 301; Public Law 97-98; Public Law 99-198; Public Law 101-624; Public Law 104-127; Public Law 105-185., Public Law 084-, 7 U.S.C. 361a-i
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
(A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research) Hatch Act funds are provided for agricultural research on an annual basis to the State Agricultural Experiment Stations (SAES's) which were established under the direction of the college or university or agricultural departments of the college or university in each State in accordance with the act approved July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301 et seq.); or such other substantially equivalent arrangements as any State shall determine. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project. (B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research) Hatch Act funds are provided for agricultural research on an annual basis to the State Agricultural Experiment Stations (SAES's) which were established under the direction of the college or university or agricultural departments of the college or university in each State in accordance with the act approved July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301 et seq.); or such other substantially equivalent arrangements as any State shall determine. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project.
Beneficiary Eligibility
Funds under the Hatch Act are allocated in accordance with the statutory formula stated in the Act to the State agricultural experiment stations of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Micronesia, and Northern Mariana Islands. These institutions have been identified and declared eligible by their respective State legislatures.
Credentials/Documentation
Credentials/Documentation (083): The System for Award Management (SAM) combines eight federal procurement systems, including CCR, and the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance into one new system. CCR activities are conducted through SAM (the CCR website will redirect users to SAM). Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM): Each applicant (unless excepted under 2 CFR SS 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal awarding agency under 2 CFR SS 25.110(d)) is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) Provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal awarding agency. It also must state that the Federal awarding agency may not make a Federal award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Federal awarding agency is ready to make a Federal award, the Federal awarding agency may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a Federal award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. Applicants must furnish the information required in the Request for Applications (RFAs). Successful applicants recommended for funding must furnish the information and assurances requested during the award documentation process. These include, but are not limited to the following: Organizational Management Information - Specific management information relating to an applicant shall be submitted on a one time basis, with updates on an as needed basis, as part of the responsibility determination prior to the award of a grant identified under this RFA, if such information has not been provided previously under this or another NIFA program. NIFA will provide copies of forms recommended for use in fulfilling these requirements as part of the preaward process. Although an applicant may be eligible based on its status as one of these entities, there are factors which may exclude an applicant from receiving Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits under this program (e.g., debarment or suspension of an individual involved or a determination that an applicant is not responsible based on submitted organizational management information). This information collection is approved under OMB Circular Control No. 0524-0026, "Assurance of Compliance with the Department of Agriculture Regulations Assuring Civil Rights, Compliance and Organization Information." SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887 RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
Preapplication coordination is required. An environmental impact statement is required for this listing. An environmental impact assessment is not required for this listing. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372. All Request for Applications (RFAs) are published on the Agency’s website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. Applications should be submitted as outlined in the RFA. Applicants must follow the instructions provided per Grants.gov. Please see the following NIFA Agency links for more information: Hatch Act Regular: http://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887 Hatch Act Multistate: http://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887-multistate-research-fund Application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system and the Research, Extension, and Education Project Online Reporting Tool (REEport), and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Applications should be submitted as outlined in the RFA. Applicants must follow the instructions provided per Grants.Gov. Application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system and the Research, Extension, and Education Project Online Reporting Tool (REEport), and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) only accepts electronic applications which are submitted via Grants.gov in response to specific Requests for Applications (RFA). Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. For information about the pre-award phase of the grant lifecycle application processes see: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/learn-grants/grants-101/pre-award-phase.html. Further, applicants must follow the instructions provided in the NIFA Grants.gov Application Guide, which can be assessed as follows: Adobe NIFA Applications. 2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA's Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887 RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Award Procedure
Funds will be released on a quarterly basis to the institutions. See Appendix A of the Request for Application (RFA) for the specific allocations. Application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system and the Research, Extension, and Education Project Online Reporting Tool (REEport), and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements. Hatch Act Funds must be fully expended in the fiscal year of appropriation; no waiver requests may be considered and approved as no carryover authority is provided in the authorizing legislation. 2 CFR Part 200 - Subpart C and Appendix I apply to this program. 2 CFR Part 400 applies to this program. Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA. Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application. Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFA). 2 CFR 200 - Subpart C and Appendix I and 2 CFR part 400 apply to this Program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887 RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional location, as appropriate for application deadlines
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
From 30 to 60 days. Section :094 - Deadlines: Dates for specific deadlines are announced in the Capacity Request for Applications (RFA) each fiscal year (FY). Section 095 - Range From 30 to 60 days. Contact the National Program Leader (NPL), as indicated per CFDA Section # 152 - Headquarters Office regarding dates for specific deadlines, start and end dates, and range of approval/disapproval time. Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. NIFA's respective links regarding general information are provided below: http://nifa.usda.gov/ http://www.grants.gov. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887 RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Appeals
Not applicable.
Renewals
Not applicable, each year of funding is awarded as a new grant. Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA), which are generally published annually. The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887
How are proposals selected?
Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Formula Grant Opportunity (FGO). 2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA's Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887
How may assistance be used?
USES: Money appropriated pursuant to this Act shall also be available, in addition to meeting expenses for research and investigations conducted under authority of Section 2, for printing and disseminating the results of such research, retirement of employees subject to the provisions of an Act approved March 4, 1940 (54 Stat. 39), administrative planning and direction, and for the purchase and rental of land and the construction, acquisition, alteration, or repair of buildings necessary for conducting research. The State Agricultural Experiment Stations are authorized to plan and conduct any research authorized under Section 2 of this Act in cooperation with each other and such other agencies and individuals as may contribute to the solution of the agricultural problems involved, and moneys appropriated pursuant to this Act shall be available for paying the necessary expenses of planning, coordinating, and conducting such cooperative research. Up to twenty-five percent (25%) of funds to be used for integrated cooperative research and extension activities. (A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research) This grant is used to support continuing agricultural research at institutions eligible to receive funds under the Act approved July 2, 1862 (12 Stat. 503, as amended) (“1862 Land-Grant Institutions”), as well as State agricultural experiment stations. Funds appropriated under this section shall be used to conduct original and other researches, investigations, and experiments bearing directly on and contributing to the establishment and maintenance of a permanent and effective agricultural industry of the United States, including researches basic to the problems of agriculture in its broadest aspects, and such investigations as have for their purpose the development and improvement of the rural home and rural life and the maximum contribution by agriculture to the welfare of the consumer, as may be deemed advisable, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of the respective States. Further, funds may be used printing and disseminating the results of such research, retirement of employees subject to the provisions of an Act approved March 4, 1940 (54 Stat. 39), administrative planning and direction, and for the purchase and rental of land and the construction, acquisition, alteration, or repair of buildings necessary for conducting research. (B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research) In addition to the uses applicable to the Regular Research funds, Multistate Research funds must be used for cooperative research employing multidisciplinary approaches in which a State agricultural experiment station, working with another State agricultural experiment station, the Agricultural Research Service, or a college or university, cooperates to solve problems that concern more than one (1) State. These funds are known as the Hatch Multistate Research Fund (MRF).
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
Performance Reports: PERFORMANCE MONITORING: See above for pertinent and specific details.
Auditing
In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, Subpart F-Audit Requirements nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more during the non-Federal entity's fiscal year in Federal awards must have a single or program-specific audit conducted for that year in accordance with the provisions of this part. A non-Federal entity that expends less than $750,000 during the non-Federal entity's fiscal year in Federal awards is exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in SS 200.503. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.
Records
In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, SS 200.333 Retention requirements for records. Grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three (3) year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved. 2 CFR Part 200, Subpart D applies to this program.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
Statutory Formula: Title The Hatch Act of 1887 Public Law 084-352 The Hatch Act of 1887

Matching is voluntary. 100%. (Other Matching Requirements: A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research) 100 percent. However, the state agricultural experiment stations in the District of Columbia and the insular areas shall provide non-Federal matching funds equal to not less than 50% of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary of Agriculture. This requirement may be waived by the Secretary. (B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research) Required Multistate Match amounts are disclosed in RFA..

MOE requirements are not applicable to this assistance listing.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
Hatch funds are expected to be fully expended in the fiscal year (FY) of appropriation; however, funds may be carried over for up to one (1) year after the end of the year for which they were appropriated. No prior approval is required to carry over funds for one (1) additional year; however, no additional carryover requests may be considered or approved, as no legislative authority to do so is provided. Further details are provided in the Award document Form NIFA-2009 and the NIFA General Terms and Conditions Grants and Cooperative Agreements (dated October 2016) at: https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887 RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. NIFA utilizes the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP), a secure, web-based electronic payment and information system that allows federal agencies to administer funds. Currently, ASAP is the only payment source for new NIFA grantees.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
NIFA is transitioning to a new location for Fiscal Year 2020. NIFA's New Mailing Address AFTER September 30, 2019 follows: National Institute of Food and Agriculture 6501 Beacon Drive Kansas City, MO 64133 Additional Websites: http://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887 http://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887-multistate-research-fund
Headquarters Office
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader,
Institute of Food Production and Sustainability, Division of Plant Systems-Protection, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2240
Washington , DC 20250-2240 US
formulagrantquestions@nifa.usda.gov
Phone: (202) 401-4939
Fax: (202) 401-1782
Website Address
http://nifa.usda.gov/grants
Financial Information
Account Identification
12-1500-0-1-352
Obligations
(Formula Grants (Apportionments)) FY 18$229,053,592.00; FY 19 est $243,418,712.00; FY 20 est $228,618,824.00; FY 17$228,105,022.00; FY 16$228,687,214.00; - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years. Multi-state allocations represent 25% of all increases above the FY 1955 base year.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
See Appendix A of the Request for Applications (RFA) for the specific allocation. If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per capacity, competitive and/or non-competitive project grant, or cooperative agreement are established, these amounts will be announced in the annual Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/hatch-act-1887
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
As an administrator of U.S. government support, NIFA works in partnership with grantees to ensure responsible stewardship of federal funds. Our grantees and partners are required to comply with all relevant rules and regulations. The following resources are provided to NIFA's partners and award recipients to support their adherence to federal regulations governing program performance: NIFA's primary (main) website: https://nifa.usda.gov/regulations-and-guidelines The following represent specific documents and direct links: POLICY GUIDE NIFA's Federal Assistance Policy Guide describes agency policies and procedures. https://nifa.usda.gov/policy-guide CERTIFICATIONS AND REPRESENTATIONS Certifications and representations provided through the NIFA application process. https://nifa.usda.gov/certifications-and-representations ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF USDA SUPPORT BY NIFA When acknowledging USDA support in accordance with 2 CFR Part 415, grantees must use the following acknowledgement for all projects or initiatives supported by NIFA. https://nifa.usda.gov/acknowledgment-usda-support-nifa FEDERAL REGULATIONS The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) lists all regulations published in the Federal Register. https://nifa.usda.gov/federal-regulations FOIA The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) provides that any person has the right to request access to federal documents and information such as research data. https://nifa.usda.gov/foia NEPA POLICY AND GUIDANCE The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Policy and Guidance set the standard for identifying potential environmental impacts. https://nifa.usda.gov/nepa-policy-and-guidance OGFM ISSUED CORRESPONDENCE The Office of Grants and Financial Management occasionally issues correspondence to applicants, grantees, and/or the general public for informational or clarification purposes. https://nifa.usda.gov/ogfm-issued-correspondence RESEARCH MISCONDUCT NIFA requires that all its awardees adhere to the USDA Scientific Integrity Policy and the Federal Policy on Research Misconduct. https://nifa.usda.gov/research-misconduct NIFA'S GENERAL AWARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS Award terms and conditions are determined by statutory, regulatory, and agency requirements, as well as each grant's circumstances. Terms and conditions dictate important items related to your grant, including method of payment, reporting frequency and content, and prior approval requirements. References to the terms and conditions of awards are located on the NIFA 2009 Award Fact Sheet. NIFA's general award terms and conditions (see link below) is applicable to this program, for awards with an award date on December 26, 2014 and thereafter. https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016.
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2016 For Fiscal Year 2016: (A) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Regular Research): A Western Region project evaluated the impacts and contributions of local and regional food systems, and the diversity of agricultural enterprises. They defined an evolving classification of local food business models that has provoked a national dialog, sharing community development ideas regarding local foods and procedures dealing with various participants of the marketing chain. (B) The Hatch Act of 1887 (Multistate Research Fund): New project was initiated in FY 2016: One project will: a) develop chemical ecology tools and information to support sustainable agriculture by reducing damage by pests in crops such as potatoes, brassicas, cucurbits, apples, blueberries, and sweet corn, while maintaining pollinator health in agricultural systems; b) define variability of chemically mediated interactions between pests, crops, and beneficial organisms in terms of plant chemistry, species interactions and landscape factors in the Northeast; c) characterize the non-target effects of pesticides on pollinators and natural enemies of pests; d) assess the impact of domestication on plant and animal chemical ecology in agricultural fields and identify unifying patterns of human and natural selection on chemical interactions of crop plants; e) establish a chemical ecology analytical facility for the Northeast to allow researchers ready access to equipment and technical expertise; and f) use extension to facilitate adoption and awareness of science-based chemical ecology tools to support sustainable production. Examples of research on continuing projects in FY 2016 include: One project will include: a) evaluation of microbial species with potential for biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens; b) validation of new collection, detection and diagnostic protocols; c) assessment of responses to sub-inhibitory fungicides in fungal plant pathogen populations; d) population genetic analysis of P. capsici using SNP database; e) data analyses, publication of scientific reports and outreach materials; f) progress reports at APS national and regional meetings as well as in the annual project meeting; and g) development and delivery of extension education and outreach materials. Another project will continue: a) residue removal data collection including animal performance and subsequent yield; b) establishment of experiments that compare modified intensive-early stocking of rangeland with breeding cattle vs. continuous stocking of breeding cattle; c) experiments evaluating modified intensive-early stocking vs. continuous stocking of breeding cattle and influence of grazing strategies on grazing land productivity, harvest efficiency, and health; d) experiments evaluating inter-seeding annuals into cool-season and warm-season grass pastures to evaluate how weather variability influences results; e) evaluation of forage yield, forage quality, animal performance, and subsequent crop yield from forage crop use; f) evaluation of calf health, reproductive performance, cow body condition score, and calf performance from confined cow sites; and g) dissemination of information via Extension efforts. (A) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2016 – HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: A Southern Region study was conducted to improve disease resistance and fruit quality in peaches using traditional breeding and molecular approaches because the perfect peach - consistently exceeding consumer expectations with satisfying appearance, aroma, flavor, shelf life, and texture and meeting industry needs for durable disease resistances - remains elusive. This work lead to the development and application of DNA tests, which, when combined with phenotypic data, have facilitated breeding programs combining horticultural quality with leaf resistance to bacterial spot and fruit resistance to brown rot. A Western Region project studied Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization and infection in horses and cattle. Investigators examined how different strains of S. aureus isolated from mastitic cows impact the outcome of mammary gland infection. This led to a better understanding of what virulence factors are used by S. aureus to cause disease, which will guide future vaccine designs. A project from the North Central region investigated novel methods for soybean genetic improvement and genomic analysis. Researchers discovered new Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) for soybean seed protein and oil content, and one (1) of the QTLs greatly influences seed protein content. (B) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2016 – HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: A new project was initiated in FY 2016. The project will: a) develop chemical ecology tools and information to support sustainable agriculture by reducing damage by pests in crops such as potatoes, brassicas, cucurbits, apples, blueberries, and sweet corn, while maintaining pollinator health in agricultural systems; b) define variability of chemically mediated interactions between pests, crops, and beneficial organisms in terms of plant chemistry, species interactions and landscape factors in the Northeast; c) characterize the non-target effects of pesticides on pollinators and natural enemies of pests; d) assess the impact of domestication on plant and animal chemical ecology in agricultural fields and identify unifying patterns of human and natural selection on chemical interactions of crop plants; e) establish a chemical ecology analytical facility for the Northeast to allow researchers ready access to equipment and technical expertise; and f) use extension to facilitate adoption and awareness of science-based chemical ecology tools to support sustainable production. Examples of research on continuing projects in FY 2016 include: (1) A project will include: a) evaluation of microbial species with potential for biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens; b) validation of new collection, detection and diagnostic protocols; c) assessment of responses to sub-inhibitory fungicides in fungal plant pathogen populations; d) population genetic analysis of P. capsici using SNP database; e) data analyses, publication of scientific reports and outreach materials; f) progress reports at APS national and regional meetings as well as in the annual project meeting; and g) development and delivery of extension education and outreach materials. (2) A project will continue: a) residue removal data collection including animal performance and subsequent yield; b) establishment of experiments that compare modified intensive-early stocking of rangeland with breeding cattle vs. continuous stocking of breeding cattle; c) experiments evaluating modified intensive-early stocking vs. continuous stocking of breeding cattle and influence of grazing strategies on grazing land productivity, harvest efficiency, and health; d) experiments evaluating inter-seeding annuals into cool-season and warm-season grass pastures to evaluate how weather variability influences results; e) evaluation of forage yield, forage quality, animal performance, and subsequent crop yield from forage crop use; f) evaluation of calf health, reproductive performance, cow body condition score, and calf performance from confined cow sites; and g) dissemination of information via Extension efforts.
Fiscal Year 2017 Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: (A) HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: Investigators in the Western Region worked to connect water quantity and water quality considerations in water-scarce regions of the arid southwest. Researchers completed a detailed analyses of water policies, including such topics as groundwater governance in the United States, the use of grey water by the building/engineering industries, and the detection of antibiotic resistance in environmental matrices, such as recycled water and grey water. A North Central project targeted three international areas: trade, environment and agriculture in a global context. Investigators focused specifically on international dimensions of comparative advantage in food, feed and biofuel production. (B) HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: Projects initiated and/or renewed in FY 2017 include: (1) A Hatch Multistate project will: a) conduct multidisciplinary conventional and molecular marker-assisted breeding, germplasm enhancement, and early-generation selection research to improve potato productivity and quality for important Eastern U.S. markets. This will help develop new potato varieties with improved disease and insect resistance, resistance to internal heat necrosis, improved processing or fresh market characteristics, and enhanced nutritional quality will be released, providing growers with better marketing opportunities and/or improved resistance to pests; b) Use novel and improved potato germplasm to reduce the impact of economically important potato pests in the Eastern US. This will increase adoption of new, high quality, pest resistant varieties, leading to increased profitability, greater worker safety, and reduced pesticide load in the environment and human diet; c) evaluate yield, quality, and pest resistance of preliminary and advanced potato breeding lines in experimental- and commercial-scale trials at multiple Eastern locations to aid industry adoption of new varieties. Multi-site evaluation and selection process will result in the release of new, broadly adapted potato varieties that will be stress tolerant and suitable for use in a changing climate; and d) provide timely and relevant information to stakeholders through various means including the maintenance of a project website and a web-based potato variety performance database for use by researchers, extension, potato growers, and allied industry members. Web-based and traditional conduits will be used for the distribution of timely and readily available potato variety production information to growers, allied industry members and consumers will be further developed and strengthened. (2) A Hatch Multistate project will: a) develop new technologies for characterizing fundamental nanoscale processes; b) Construct and characterize self-assembled nanostructures that will lead to development of tools and products and benefit different aspects of agriculture and biological engineering research; c) Develop devices and systems incorporating microfabrication and nanotechnology; d) Develop a framework for economic, environmental and health risk assessment for nanotechnologies applied to food, agriculture and biological systems; e) Develop/improve education and outreach materials on nanofabrication, sensing, systems integration and application risk assessment; and f) Improve academic-industry partnership to help move the developed technologies to commercialization phase. Examples of research on continuing projects include: (1) A Hatch Multistate project will: a) develop new technologies for management of flies (biting and nuisance) in organic and conventional animal agriculture systems. This include in depth evaluation of the natural repellents used on livestock and further understand of how flies respond to repellents. Develop and evaluate recognition software to estimate fly population densities on livestock. Provide recommendations for alternative bedding materials to minimize fly development and optimal trapping strategies for target species; b) Detect Insecticide resistance and develop management strategies. Produce research and extension publications describing the mechanism(s) of resistance to insecticides in house flies, stable flies and horn flies. A database of resistance mechanisms by fly species and geographic distribution will be made available to support management efforts directed at house flies and stable flies. Develop a publicly-accessible database of the house fly and stable fly genomes that can be queried by fly researchers from various scientific disciplines; c) Investigate microbial ecology, epithelial immunity, and vector competence of biting and nuisance flies. Identification of attractive and repellent compounds from stable fly larval development substrates and from bacteria associated with flies and their development sites. Attractive lures will be developed and tested based upon fly response to these compounds. A database of bacterial, viral, and fungal taxa associated with blow flies will be developed. Produce research and extension publications describing infection of house flies by bacteria and other pathogens of concern to humans. Evaluate, develop and recommend selected essential oils with documented antimicrobial or microstatic activity against mastitis in dairy cattle; d) Characterize population biology of biting and nuisance flies. Datasets will be produced and made available describing the dispersal distance of stable flies with additional recorded data on environmental factors that affect dispersal. A population growth model for stable fly using time-series datasets will be provided to collaborators for use in further research or extension to growers and other extension clientele. A database of larval development site characteristics will be produced and made available; and e) Community and stakeholder engagement by developing a searchable, national database of all pesticides registered in the US for use in animal agriculture will be compiled and updated annually. A national website with links to all currently available livestock entomology research and extension information from across the US will be made available to our stakeholders. Collaborate on developing regular state, regional and national updates for user groups (Extension agents, producer groups, veterinarians, etc.) through conference calls and/or on-line conferencing utilities. We will conduct pest specific webinars for farmers/stakeholders (conventional and organic), private practitioners.
Fiscal Year 2018 Fiscal Year (FY) 2018: (A) HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: A North Central study is investigating biocontrol of foodborne pathogens on fresh produce using bacteriophages. Bacteriophages are potentially useful in controlling foodborne pathogens on minimally processed products since phage application is a non-destructive treatment. A project in the Southern region is being conducted to identify genes and gene products that can be manipulated to improve reproduction, health, animal well-being, and production in livestock. Researchers are studying gene and protein expression profiles in unique populations to identify and understand biological pathways associated with these important traits. (B) HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: New projects which began in Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 include: (1) Regulation of Photosynthetic Processes Collaborators participating in this regional project will place considerable focus on understanding and improving the response of photosynthesis to genetic, developmental and environmental factors that limit productivity. The research spans all levels of organization from the molecular and cellular through the leaf, whole plant and canopy. Particular emphasis will be placed on abiotic stresses (i.e., heat, cold, drought and salinity), nitrogen- and water-use efficiency, carbon flux pathways, and the signal transduction mechanisms that initiate the plant response. (2) Enteric Diseases of Food Animals: Enhanced Prevention, Control and Food Safety The long-term goal of this collaborative project is to develop strategies to prevent and control enteric diseases of cattle, swine, and poultry, ultimately to decrease the incidence of enteric diseases in food animals, and decrease zoonotic food and water-borne illnesses in the USA. (3) Improving Forage and Bioenergy Crops for Better Adaptation, Resilience, and Flexibility This project is directed to these focus areas: Breeding crops with higher forage yield, improved forage quality for livestock production, longevity, and resistance or tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress conditions will provide more economical food production; forage crops need to be developed that will be productive under abiotic stresses, including drought, flooding, cold and warm temperatures, and soil salinity; Research needs to be done on stand establishment (improved seed germination and seedling vigor), biomass production, disease and insect resistance, etc., across multiple environments, especially on marginal soils where these species are likely to be used without competing with food crops; and Improving the yield, nutritional quality, and storability of forage crops will ensure an ample supply of good quality feed to animals and an essential step in securing the food chain to the consumer. (4) Elder Financial Exploitation: Family Risk and Protective Factors This project will address the following objectives: a) Understand family members' experiences (thoughts and feelings) related to elder financial exploitation by a relative; b) Identify risk and protective factors in family systems that increase or decrease the likelihood of family elder financial exploitation; c) Identify the range and scope of family experiences foundational to family elder financial exploitation, including the consequences of EFE on family systems; d) Disseminate findings and implications to gerontology, family studies, and family economics researchers and educators, law enforcement and attorneys, community-based practitioners, and family member; e) Continue to design further studies that build on earlier findings and create a conceptual model or expand Rabiner et al. (2004) Conceptual Model of Elder Financial Exploitation; and f) Social, Economic and Environmental Causes and Consequences of Demographic Change in Rural America. This project proposes to undertake a comprehensive analysis of current population processes affecting U.S. rural areas and provide to stakeholders policy-relevant research findings on the demographic causes and consequences of socioeconomic and environmental change.
Fiscal Year 2019 Fiscal Year (FY) 2019: (A) HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: A North Central study is evaluating soil microbiome composition as an indicator of soil health. Researchers aim to develop a resource that will provide the basis for incorporating soil microbiome analysis into the standard package of soil health testing. A project in the Western region examines the regulatory roles of small RNAs and modification of the activity of plant genes in the immune response of fruits and vegetables to fungal and bacterial plant pathogens. Citrus greening disease is a very destructive disease that threatens the future of the U.S. citrus industry. By examining small RNAs and the activity patterns of genes in susceptible and tolerant citrus varieties, the scientists have identified regulators of the citrus immune response that can be used to develop citrus varieties that may be more resistant to the bacterial pathogen that causes citrus greening disease. (B) HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: New projects which began in fiscal year (FY) 2019 include: (1) Biochemistry and Genetics of Plant-Fungal Interactions. Fungi are the dominant causal agents of plant disease in both agriculture and natural ecosystems. A better understanding of plant-fungal interactions and the response of plants to pathogens is critical to the development of effective and long term control measures. This new multistate committee will: a) Bring together scientists that study the genetics and biochemistry of fungal-plant interactions in several different economically important fungal genera having different trophic interactions with plants. These genera include Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cochliobolus, Colletotrichum, Fusarium, Magnaporthe, Monilinia, Pyrenophora, Sclerotinia and Ustilago. b) Identify common and unique genetic and/or biochemical mechanisms required for infection and plant colonization by the economically important fungal genera named in Objective 1. c) As a logical extension of Objective 2, identify common and unique genetic and/or biochemical components of plant hosts that facilitate or deter diverse fungal-plant associations of the economically important fungal genera named in Objective 1. d) Integrate research findings concerning the biology and genomics of plant-fungal interactions with new information about resistance mechanisms in host plants (integrate Objectives 2 and 3), thereby providing field pathologists and agronomists with improved management strategies against plant pathogens. e) Explore new and collaborative funding possibilities to enhance activities. (2) Genetic Bases for Resistance and Immunity to Avian Diseases. Disease remains a major issue for the poultry industry. Economic losses due to morbidity, poor performance, and mortality are significant with the added threat that some bacterial and viral zoonotic pathogens can cause human illness or death. With a major focus on antibiotic free (ABF) production, understanding and optimizing immune function has become of paramount importance to maintaining sustainable levels of production. The objectives of the new multistate project are to: a) To Determine how Allelic Variation Influences the Efficacy of Innate and Acquired Immune Functions b) To Identify Factors and Agents Affecting Poultry Immune Development, Function, Dysfunction and Pathology c) To Develop and Employ Genetic Stocks, Methods, Reagents and other Tools to Assess Basic Immune Function, Characterize Immune Evolutionary Processes, Guide Genetic Selection, and Increase Resistance to or Protection Against Avian Diseases This multistate project will facilitate a better understanding of polymorphic loci and the consequence of selection on poultry health and production; new breeding strategies to produce more robust, disease resistant lines of poultry; improved efficacy of vaccines and other pharmaceutical agents; new vaccine programs for controlling existing as well as emerging diseases; a better comprehension of immune responses to specific antigens and a better fundamental understanding of how the avian immune system functions. (3) U.S. Agricultural Trade and Policy in a Dynamic Global Market Environment. U.S. agriculture is dependent on the international market. The U.S. has long been a proponent of developing opportunities for trade through multilateral, bilateral, and regional trade agreements. Recent events, however, including the U.S. withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the announced renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) create uncertainties with respect to their implications for U.S. agriculture. This multistate project will a. Determine the impacts of U.S. and foreign policies, regulations, market structures, and productivity on U.S. food and agricultural trade, the economy, and the environment. Specifically, to examine the impact of the following a1. foreign investment and multinational firms, b1. international and national events and policies (e.g., Farm Bill, immigration and labor issues, food fraud, food labeling laws), and c1. economic growth and changing policies of developing and emerging economies, including safeguards or other mechanisms that target food security. b. Determine the impacts of international trade agreements and institutions on U.S. food and agricultural trade, the economy, and the environment. Specifically, to examine the potential implications of the following: a2. renegotiating preferential trade agreements (e.g., NAFTA), b2. not engaging in preferential trade agreements (e.g. Trans Pacific Partnership), and c2. future preferential trade agreements. This project will help a. increase ability to understand and predict changes resulting from changes in trade agreements. b. increase ability to understand and predict changes resulting from changes in domestic policy. c. provide more clientele exposure to trade research and information. (4) Integrated Systems Research and Development in Automation and Sensors for Sustainability of Specialty Crops. There is continuing need for sufficient and effective sensors, optimized assistive mechanization, and automation systems for specialty crops (fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits and nursery). This is because many of the underlying biological processes related to quality and condition of fruits and vegetables are not readily transferred into engineering concepts. Biological variability, coupled with variable environmental factors, creates challenges and opportunities for developing sensors and automation systems for effective implementation at various stages of the production, harvest, and postharvest handling chain. This multistate research group will a. Adapt biological concepts associated with specialty crop production, harvest, and postharvest handling into quantifiable parameters which can be sensed b. Develop specialty crop architectures and systems that are more amenable to mechanized production c. Study interactions between machinery and crop to provide basis for creating optimal mechanical and/or automated solutions for specialty crop production d. Develop sensors and sensing systems which can phenotype and measure and interpret quality parameters e. Design and evaluate automation systems which incorporate varying degrees of mechanization and sensors to assist specialty crop industries with labor, management decisions, and reduction of production costs f. Develop collaboration and work in partnership with equipment and technology manufacturers to commercialize and implement the outcomes of this project This multistate project will help in a. Specialty crop technology development, b. Modernized, mechanization compatible crop production designs, c. Research publications in the design of specialty crop technologies, d. Training of graduate and undergraduate students in the design and concepts of specialty crop automated equipment, e. Workshops and other continuing education opportunities for practicing scientists and engineers, f. Competitive advantage for domestic specialty crop producers by increasing labor efficiency with automated equipment and systems, g. Healthier and safer working environment for the remaining human workforce used in specialty crop production and handling, i. Manufacturing workforce (design engineers, mechanics, operators) better prepared to manufacture and use automated equipment for specialty crop production, postharvest storage, processing, handling, and sorting, j. Reduction of the impact of specialty crop production on the environment through more precise field, postharvest facilities, and packinghouse operations
Fiscal Year 2020 Fiscal Year (FY) 2020: (A) HATCH REGULAR RESEARCH: A Southern region project looks to identify opportunities to optimize swine production systems for the efficiency of nutrient utilization by investigating the variability generated by pig/microflora interactions. Investigators will combine information obtained for dense marker genotypes and microbiota sequence information from a large nucleus population with performance data on growth and intake. With this information, the investigators aim to provide solid evidence of the extent of genetic control of the gut microbiome population composition in swine and its relationship with growth efficiency. (B) HATCH MULTI-STATE RESEARCH: When approved, new projects which began in Fiscal Year 2020 will be posted on the National Information Management Support System (NIMSS) at https://www.nimss.org/ . Pertinent information will be provided by Program at a future date.