Cooperative Extension Service

 

GENERAL: [As reflected in Part I,B. of the Request for Applications (RFA) or Capacity Requests for Applications (Capacity RFA)]
1. Smith-Lever (3b) & (c) Capacity Grants (formerly known as Formula Funds)

a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (formerly known as 3b & c Formula Funds)
These funds are used by institutions eligible to receive funds under the Act of Congress approved July second, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, entitled ‘‘An Act donating public lands to the several States and Territories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts’’ (Twelfth Statutes at Large, page five hundred and three) (“1862 Land-grant Institutions”), for the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending or resident in 1862 Land-grant Institutions in the several communities, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects.
The purpose of this funding is to conduct agricultural extension work.

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) –
The purpose of this funding is to increase the level of agricultural extension work. These funds are used to support extension activities identified in the eligible institution’s approved 5-Year Plan of Work. Special Needs funds are allocated to a State Cooperative Extension Service to fulfill a purpose or overcome a condition peculiar to the State, as compared to the country as a whole, or for a purpose not normally a part of the continuing extension program.

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program
Funds support innovative extension education approaches to addressing risks, hazards and disasters. The Cooperative Extension Service (CES) has an important role in reducing the impact of disasters through extension education. The Extension Special Needs program sponsors targeted projects that enable CES to assist in preparing for, providing an educational response to, and recovering from disasters. Education programming funded by this program will help communities, families and individuals become more self-sustaining by strengthening and increasing their resiliency to disaster. Some types of hazards and disaster related events funded in previous years include uncertainties caused by losses of economic infrastructure, severe weather or other natural disasters, security breaches, human disease, or high consequence animal diseases and plant pests.

There has been an increase in public awareness regarding the number and severity of disaster type critical incidents involving earthquakes, tsunamis, tornadoes, wildfire, drought, contagious disease, and terrorist events. The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Environment and Natural Resources and the Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction of the National Science and Technology Council have acknowledged the many effective roles that the Cooperative Extension System (CES) has played in disaster preparedness, response and remediation.

Within the states and territories, the CES has repeatedly served as the trusted community organization that has helped to enable families, communities, and businesses to successfully prepare for, respond to and cope with disaster losses and critical incidents. Once a disaster has occurred, the local extension outreach includes: 1) Communicating practical science-based risk information, 2) Developing relevant educational experiences and programs, 3) Working with individuals and communities to open new communication channels, and 4) Mitigating losses and facilitating recovery. Never was this more evident than after hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005 and during the 2008 Midwestern Summer flooding. During and after these incidents, local Extension agents served as a critical communication node throughout affected urban and rural areas, particularly when traditional communication systems were temporarily overwhelmed or destroyed.

The Extension Special Needs RFA encourages proposals that specifically address one or more of the following six key target areas:

1. Education and Technical assistance through inter-disciplinary and multi-state disaster training programs and demonstration projects for problem solving, especially those which build upon already existing strengths, contribute to or expand the EDEN and/or eXtension educational materials related to disaster preparation, mitigation, response and recovery;

2. Collaboration with Federal, state and local agencies and other disaster relief organizations to support education and service activities that enhance recovery of impacted rural communities, schools, businesses and agricultural-based activities;

3. Long range family, community and regional planning projects that will enhance implementation of programs that serve public needs in preparation for, during and after emergency situations within impacted States and across impacted regions;

4. Communication delivery of key information that meets end-users’ needs in a timely fashion with consideration of potentially limited communication channels due to disaster situations;

5. Dissemination of credible, science-based information that is reliable and easily accessible even if electronic access is compromised; and

6. Integrated Research and Extension Planning Projects (up to $15,000) are intended to provide assistance to applicants in bringing together teams for the development of highly competitive grant proposals where extension personnel would apply for large grants (in excess of $250,000) from other grant programs (e.g., the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative and etc…) and lead nationally important disaster prevention, protection and mitigation projects.

Fundable projects should support education and extension activities which:

1. Reduce risk through planning, disaster preparedness and emergency response by improving communication between the public, community leaders, state and Federal agencies;

2. Develop strategies and educational materials and/or programming in the area of emergency planning, infrastructure design and disaster recovery operation;

3. Develop community networks that provide real-time disaster education information; and/or

4. Develop or expand educational materials regarding disaster issues suitable for use and distribution by the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN) or the eXtension Community of Practice working with disaster planning.

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement)
Capacity grants (formerly known as "Formula") authorized under the CSRS Retirement Contributions Program. These grants are used to defray the CSRS Retirement costs to the 1862 land-grant institutions for the former Schedule A Appointments who conduct agricultural extension work.

Fiscal Year 2014 represented the last year that NIFA published a RFA for this program.

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement)
These grants are used to defray the FERS Retirement costs to the 1862 land-grant institutions for the former Schedule A Appointments who conduct agricultural extension work.

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC

These funds are used by the University of the District of Columbia for the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending the University of the District of Columbia, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects.

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and (newly designated) Central State University (Section 1444)
The purpose of this funding is to support agricultural and forestry extension activities at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and Central State University.

3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):
(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education)
These grants are used to assist all States in carrying out a program of extension activities designed to employ and train professional and paraprofessional aides to engage in direct nutrition education of low-income families and in other appropriate nutrition education programs.

(b) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR)
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(d) Farm Safety
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(f) Pest Management
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD)
Effective FY 2014, this Program was consolidated under Research. See CFDA 10.215 for pertinent details.

(h) Federally Recognized Tribes
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(j) EIPM Support
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(k) EIPM Coordination
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act
The purpose of the grant program is to provide funds for projects that:
(1) Have national or regional relevancy;
(2) Develop new and innovative projects that can be replicated at other institutions; or
(3) Develop a strategic framework for the nationwide forest and rangeland resources extension program.
NFF priorities are those that have been identified in the FY 2005-2009 RREA Strategic Plan:
http://www.nifa.usda.gov/nea/nre/in_focus/forests_if_rrea.html.

(b) Rural Health and Safety
As specified in 7 U.S.C. 2662, grants will be made to establish the Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Programs carried out by the eligible organizations in rural areas. The assistance provided by these programs, to the extent practicable, shall be coordinated with and delivered in cooperation with similar services or assistance by other Federal Agencies or programs for rural residents.

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions
This program provides funding to (1) increase Extension program capacity at 1994 institutions; and (2) address special needs, take advantage of important opportunities, and/or demonstrate long-term sustained benefits of Extension projects at 1994 institutions. In FY 2009, funded projects will support one or more of the six NIFA Strategic Goals (see Part VIII, E., Definitions) outlined in the NIFA Strategic Plan for FY 2007-2012:
1) Enhance international competitiveness of American agriculture;
2) Enhance the competitiveness and sustainability of rural and farm economies;
3) Support increased economic opportunities and improved quality of life in rural America;
4) Enhance protection and safety of the Nation's agriculture and food supply;
5) Improve the Nation's nutrition and health; and
6) Protect and enhance the Nation's natural resource base and environment.

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions
As specified in 7 U.S.C. 7630, grants will be made to establish pilot projects to expand the youth development programs carried out by the eligible organizations in rural areas or small towns.
Broad Purposes:
• Support and enhance the goals, objectives, and priorities of the eligible youth organizations;
• Support programs which address issues and needs of rural youth;
• Involve youth in design and implementation of their educational activities;
• Increase knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors necessary for rural youth to live productive, contributing, and fulfilling lives; and
• Increase economic opportunities and sustainability and improve quality of life in rural communities through enhanced human, social, civic, natural, financial, cultural, and built capital.

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD)
The purpose of the FARAD is to provide livestock producers, extension specialists, scientists, and veterinarians with up to date information to prevent drug, pesticide and environmental contaminant residues in food animal products.

(f) Federal Administration
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447)

The 1890 Facilities Grants Program provides funds for the acquisition and improvement of agricultural and food sciences facilities and equipment, including libraries, so that the 1890 land-grant institutions, Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and (newly designated) Central State University, may participate fully in the production of human capital in the food and agricultural sciences.

(h) Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnership Grants Program (aka ARPA & RME & ERME)
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
10.500
Federal Agency/Office
Agency: Department of Agriculture
Office: National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
FORMULA GRANTS; PROJECT GRANTS
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2014: For Fiscal Year 2014:

(A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [aka Smith-Lever 3 (b) & (c) Capacity (formerly known as “Formula”)] Grants Programs:

This formula based program allocation was $286,171,980 with funds being provided to land-grant institutions in each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Insular Areas. A matching requirement is a key component of the program.

(B) Cooperative Extension at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) – aka Smith-Lever Special Needs] Grants Program:

The purpose of this funding is to increase the level of agricultural extension activities and reaching out to new audiences. This special needs formula based program allocation was $1,029,979 with funds being provided to land-grant institutions in selected states of the country.

A matching requirement is a key component of the program.

(C) Smith-Lever Special Needs [Sections 3 (b) & (c)] Competitive Grants Program:

The Smith Lever Special Needs projects funded the development of educational programs and demonstration activities focusing on disaster preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery. The projects must support innovative, education-based approaches to addressing emergency preparedness and specific responses related to natural and human-made disasters.

Eight applications were received for FY2014 funding.

The range of proposal requests was from $15,000 to $115,504 and the total allocation available is approximately $462,000.

(D) Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions and (newly designated) Central State University (aka 1890 Capacity Building and/or CBG) Grants Program:

For FY 2015, $43,920,000, was appropriated for this program; of that amount, $42,163,200 was used to support for extension work in 17 states. Individual awards ranged from $1,179,123 to $4,399,907.

The program required a 1:1 dollar match of total funds awarded to each institution.

In FY 2014, half of the institutions were granted matching waivers, which did not exceed 50% of the total amount of funds awarded. Justifications for the waivers varied per institution and state.

(E) Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) aka Smith-Lever 3d EFNEP and/or ENUT] Grants Program:

The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) brings together federal, state, and local resources to target two primary audiences: low-income families with young children and low-income youth. The program is delivered by the 1862 and the 1890 Land-Grant Institutions. It operates in over 800 counties throughout the 50 states, six U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia. Each year, more than one half million new participants complete the program.

In FY 2014, EFNEP received $67,934,000 in federal funding. EFNEP reached 121,850 adults and 392,563 youth directly and over 360,000 family members indirectly. 85% of EFNEP participants who reported income were at or below 100% of poverty, earning $23,850 a year or less for a family of four. At least 72% of all EFNEP adults are minorities. This is significant because poor health disproportionately affects minority and low-income populations. As well, educational opportunities and resources are limited.

EFNEP consistently demonstrates strong results. FY 2014 data confirms adult graduates:
• Improve their diets: 94% report more closely following dietary recommendations, including consuming an extra 1/2 cup of fruits and vegetables.
• Improve their nutrition practices: 89% improve nutrition practices, such as making healthier food choices and reading nutrition labels.
• Stretch their food dollars farther: 84% improve food resource management practices, such as planning meals and shopping with a grocery list.
• Handle food more safely: 66% improve food safety practices, such as storing and thawing food properly.
• Increase their physical activity rates: 38% increase their physical activity level by 30 minutes or more.

(F) Regional Integrated Pest Management Competitive Grants Programs:

(F-1) North Central Region (aka NC-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(F-2) Northeastern Region (aka NE-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(F-3) Southern Region (aka S-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(F-4) Western Region (aka W-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

FARM SAFETY – COMBINED PROGRAMS (G), (H) & (W):

(G) Farm Safety;
(H) Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program (aka YFSEC); and
(W) Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -
National AgrAbility Project:

In FY 2012, Congress consolidated Extension 3(d) line items Farm Safety (AgrAbility) and Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification into a single line item.

In FY 2014, approximately $4,422,450 was available for project awards (after subtracting administrative and panel costs) to support AgrAbility and Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification (YFSEC) projects.

Of this amount, $334,265 was made available for one 1 continuation award for YFSEC, approximately $1,574,532 for seven 7 AgrAbility continuation awards (including State and Regional AgrAbility Projects and National AgrAbility Project), and $2,513,653 was available for 14 new State AgrAbility awards.

As in the past, the AgrAbility program maintained its focus on supporting state and regional projects that increase the likelihood that individuals with disabilities and their families engaged in production agriculture (AgrAbility’s customers) will become more successful.

Through the YFSEC program, NIFA made a continuation award to Pennsylvania State University for Year 2 of the project initiated in FY 2013 to develop a national training curriculum that lessens agricultural hazards to youth workers. The training will align with Career Cluster Standards (CCS) of the National Council for Agricultural Education for a unified approach to a national farm safety education and curricula-certification program for youth. The project will establish a national steering committee to engage the Department of Education, Department of Labor, FFA, Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, Ag Safety and Health Council of America, National Council for Ag Education, and other relevant partners.

The committee will work to identify curriculum and testing gaps, certification needs and industry-recognized credentials. Curriculum materials will be placed on the eXtension website in the Ag Safety and Health CoP to be used in both formal and non-formal settings. A national outreach strategy will promote use of the curriculum from youth and farm safety instructors to parents and 4-H youth programs.

Additionally, the project will determine the resources required to sustain a clearinghouse for national youth farm safety and education curriculum, state certification requirements and testing. Penn State’s partners on this project include the Ohio State University, University of Kentucky, Utah State University, and CareerSafe. NIFA made the award through the YFSEC Program, which was established in 2001 in response to the need for alignment between youth vocational agricultural program curricula and youth agricultural safety and health standards.

(I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE):

In FY 2014 the major accomplishment was the development and vetting of a new Strategic Plan for the eXtension Initiative that is partially funded by NTAE funds. The new plan offers more focus on innovation, professional development, and a new financial model. Entering into the implementation phase, eXtension issued an RFP for Innovation Projects, receiving 49 proposals and funding nine. The hiring process for a new Foundation Chief Executive Officer began. Five eXtension Fellows were engaged with State and Local Value Enhancement activity from Purdue University, Fort Valley State University, University of Delaware, University of Vermont, and Virginia Tech. Three Learning Networks were launched around Educational Technology, Women in Agriculture, and Climate Science.

The 2016 National eXtension Conference is being planned and the Australian project continues to expand. Four new user communities have been launched around Big Data, Virtual Reality, Unmanned Aerial Systems, and Wearable Technologies.

CHILDREN, YOUTH, AND FAMILIES (CYFAR) COMBINED PROGRAMS - (J), (U) & (V):

(J) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (aka Youth at Risk and/or CYFAR);
(U) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP); and
(V) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP);

For the FY 2014 award cycle, $8,059,200.00 was available for project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs.

A total of 40 academic institutions submitted applications requesting
$26,513,460 in this year’s competition. In April 2014, a 13-member peer review panel evaluated these applications.

Funds were available to support a total of seven awards in the following project types: one 4-H Military ($600,000); 27 Sustainable Community Projects ($3,915,000); 22 New Sustainable Community Projects ($2,250,000); Professional Development and Technical Assistance ($995,525).

The funding ratio for this program in FY 2014 was 55%.
Funded projects should address one of the following CYFAR National Outcomes:
a) Early Childhood;
b) School Age;
c) Teens; or
d) Parent/Family.

For the FY 2014 award cycle, $995,525 will be available for CYFAR- Professional Development and Technical Assistance (PDTA) project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs. For this PDTA award, one university was awarded this new continuation award. The funded project is designed to address the professional development and technical assistance needs of the CYFAR SCP grantees.

The CYFAR PDTA Center was developed and serves as a mechanism to support the success of the CYFAR initiative through the development and provision of Project Coaching, Proactive evaluation & technical assistance, and Resources and Tools. Strategic Leadership Team, Advisory Committee, and Subject Matter Experts serve as representatives across the land-grant system representative of 1862, 1890, 1994, and Hispanic-serving Institutions. The PDTA Center supports CYFERnet.org and CYFERnetSEARCH.org..

(K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education-Professional Development (aka Chapter 3 and/or SARE-PD):

The FY 2014 Appropriations Act consolidated this funding line with the CFDA 10.215 funding line for Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (aka SARE Chapter 1).

NOTES:
(1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.
(2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details.

(L) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP):

In 2014, the FRTEP program was under the second year of a four-year continuation. NIFA awarded $2,917,439 to 36 projects. Awards ranged from $65,400 to $117,400. A portion of the $117,400 award will be used to support all 36 schools with attendance at the annual project director’s conference held at the annual Inter-Tribal Ag Council in Las Vegas.

EXTENSION AT 1994 INSTITUTIONS COMBINED PROGRAMS (M) & (BB) :

(M) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and/or TCEP); and
(BB) Tribal Colleges Extension-Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE):

A new four-year continuation cycle began. NIFA awarded 31 capacity grants and 14 special emphasis awards totaling $4,263,660. The special emphasis awards will run for two years. The capacity awards will have a four-year funding cycle. The capacity award amount is $100,000 per award. . For special emphasis NIFA awarded one grant for $90,000, one for $40,000, two for $89,000 and 10 for $85,000.

RENEWABLE RESOURCES EXTENSION ACT COMBINED PROGRAMS (N) & (O):

(N) Renewable Resources Extension Act (aka RREA); and
(O) Renewable Resources Extension Act-National Focus Fund Projects (aka RREA-NFF):

Examples of the impacts that RREA capacity funds provide (69 of 72 institutions reporting to date):
• Number of forest and rangeland Extension educational events – 2,360+
• Number of landowners adopting at least one new management practice – 13,695 925+
• Number of forest and rangeland acres impacted – 5,595,459 +
• Number of forest management plans developed – 2358

For the FY 2014 funding cycle, $300,000 was available for competitive National Focus Funds projects. Two awards were made:
• eXtension Community of Practice – Climate, Forests, and Woodlands; and
• Discovering Our Nation’s Rangelands.

(P) Rural Health and Safety Education (Competitive) Grants Program (aka RHSE):

In FY 2014, $1,438,200 was available, after administrative and panel costs, to support Extension projects through the RHSE program.

Proposals were expected to be community-based, outreach education programs, such as those conducted through Human Science extension outreach, that provides individuals and families with:
• Information as to the value of good health at any age;
• Information to increase individual or family’s motivation to take more responsibility for their own health;
• Information regarding rural environmental health issues that directly impact on human health;
• Information about and access to health promotion and educational activities; and
• Training for volunteers and health services providers concerning health promotion and health care services for individuals and families in cooperation with state, local, and community partners.

In order to achieve these program goals, the RHSE program focused on supporting new individual RHSE projects and projects scaling-up existing Extension Programs to State/Regional Levels.

Proposed budgets for new individual projects were capped at $150,000. Proposed budgets for partnership projects that would scale-up existing programs to State or Regional levels could not exceed $300,000.

Of the 21 proposals that underwent panel review, 12 New Individual Projects were recommended for funding. No proposals met RFA requirements for consideration as a Partnership Project.

(Q) 1890 Facilities Grant Program and Tuskegee and (newly designated) Central State University (aka Section 1447):

For FY 2014:
Congress appropriated $19,730,000 to support this program. The funding allocation to the states was $18,940,800, which reflects adjustments for administrative costs. In 2014 a new school was designated as an 1890 Land-Grant Institution, bringing the total to 19, which includes Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University, and Central State University. This funding will support the second year of the five-year Plan of Work at 18 of the 1890 Land-Grant Institutions.

In support of the newly designated 1890 Land-Grant Institution, a four-year plan of work and a one-year funding application was requested through a Request for Application with a closing date of August 1, 2014.

The range of funding was $806,696 to $1,510,916 which was distributed to the 19 institutions on a formula basis.

Facilities funds are being used for the acquisition and improvement of agricultural and food sciences facilities and equipment, as well as libraries, so the 1890 land-grant institutions may participate fully in the development of human capital in the food and agricultural sciences.

(R) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD):

For the FY 2014 award cycle, Congress appropriated $1,250,000 to support FARAD, which is funded under its own line item authority.

Four applications were received and evaluated under competition waiver administrative processes. FARAD applications were merit reviewed internally by National Program Staff and all four entities were funded. This 30-year-old high performing integrated consortium of collaborating institutions includes at each Land-Grant campus a lead PD and his/her respective scientific staff.

The funding ratio for this program in FY 2014 was 100% due to the competition waiver process.

FARAD is a university-based national program that serves as the primary source for scientifically-based recommendations regarding safe withdrawal intervals of drugs (used off-label) and chemicals in food-producing animals. As such, FARAD is a key resource for protection of our nation's food supply, including meat, milk, and eggs, against accidental contamination of animal-derived foods with violative residues of drugs, pesticides, or other agents that could compromise food safety.

(S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development and/or RYD Grants Program):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(T) Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka ARPA, ERME and/or RME Program):

In FY 2014, Extension Risk Management Education (ERME) and Outreach provided funding to Special Emphasis Audiences, resulting in an increased number of proposals and awards of projects serving diverse communities and audiences. Supported funding and oversight of the ERME Conference, which includes an annual thematic program focus on “Women in Agriculture.”

Regional Centers’ Programs delivered the following:


RegionNumber of Projects FundedNumber of Participants Reached
North Central 10 6,173
Northeast 11 2,673
Southern 9 1,767
Western 16 6,134
Grand Total 46 16,747


(U) – CYFAR-SCP and (V) – CYFAR-PDTA are part of the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS.

NOTE: See (J) - CYFAR above for pertinent details regarding the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS (J), (U) & (V).

(W) – AgrAbility is part of the COMBINED FARM SAFETY PROGRAMS.

NOTE: See (G) – Farm Safety and (H) – YFSEC above for pertinent details.

(X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (aka IPM-CS):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.


(Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act:

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(Z) Military Family Readiness System (aka MFRS):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(AA) Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(BB) Tribal Colleges Extension Program- Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) – Programs Combined - See CFDA 10.500 (M) above.

(CC) District of Columbia Public Secondary Education Reorganization Act Program (CES-Formula):

For FY 2014:
The College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSES) embodies the land-grant tradition, offering cutting edge academic programs in environmental science, urban sustainability, water resources management, nutrition and dietetics, urban architecture and community planning. Funds are being used to carry out educational programs and research in Climate Change; Global Food Security and Hunger; Health, Nutrition and Childhood Obesity Prevention; Urban Families, Youth and Communities; and Sustainable Energy through UDC’s two essential land-grant components, the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service, including five land-grant centers:
(1) Center for Urban Agriculture & Gardening Education,
(2) Center for Sustainable Development,
(3) Center for Nutrition, Diet & Health,
(4) Center for 4H & Youth Development, and
(5) Architectural Research Institute. Fiscal Year 2015: For Fiscal Year 2015:

(A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [aka Smith-Lever 3 (b) & (c) Capacity (formerly known as “Formula”)] Grants Programs:

For FY 2015:
$288,022,464 is being allocated to support individual projects that may be initiated under this program.

Awards range from $100,000 to $13,255,226.

The program has a matching requirement; with over 98 % of the organizations that receive funds having to match 100% of the award amount.

The total amount of required matching funds in FY 2015 is $280,548,168

(B) Cooperative Extension at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) – aka Smith-Lever Special Needs] Grants Program:

For FY 2015:
$1,029,979 was allocated to support individual projects that may be initiated under this program.

Awards ranged from $11,347 to $111,504.

The program has a matching requirement, with over 98 % of the organizations that receive funds having to match 100% of the award amount.

The total amount of required matching funds in FY 2015 is $1,029,979.

(C) Smith-Lever Special Needs [Sections 3 (b) & (c)] Competitive Grants Program:

For FY 2015:
National Institute of Food and Agriculture Smith-Lever Special Needs projects fund the development of educational programs and demonstration activities focusing on disaster preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery. The project supports innovative, education-based approaches to addressing emergency preparedness and specific responses related to natural and human-made disasters.

Seven applications were received for FY2015 funding, and the range of proposal requests was from $15,000 to $120,000.

(D) Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions and (newly designated) Central State University (aka 1890 Capacity Building and/or CBG) Grants Program:

In FY 2015 the program was funded at the 2014 level of $43,920,000. The funds were distributed based on a formula. A dollar for dollar match was required and institutions who could not secure the match were granted a waiver for up to 50% of the total funds awarded.

(E) Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) aka Smith-Lever 3d EFNEP and/or ENUT] Grants Program:

For FY 2015:
Historically EFNEP outcomes and impacts are consistent. In FY 2015, similar results are anticipated as those reported above for FY 2014.

(F) Regional Integrated Pest Management Competitive Grants Programs:

(F-1) North Central Region (aka NC-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(F-2) Northeastern Region (aka NE-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(F-3) Southern Region (aka S-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(F-4) Western Region (aka W-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

FARM SAFETY – COMBINED PROGRAMS (G), (H) & (W):

(G)Farm Safety;
(H)Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program (aka YFSEC); and
(W) Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities - National AgrAbility Project:

In FY 2015, approximately $4,610,000 is available to support Farm Safety (i.e., AgrAbility) and Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification (YFSEC) programs. Of this amount, $150,000 is made available for YFSEC (i.e. SAY project) to continue part of the work performed through the FY 2013 and FY 2014 funding.

Approximately $3,732,450 is available to support 18 AgrAbility continuation awards (including National AgrAbility Project) and $540,000 is available for new State AgrAbility awards. As in the past, the AgrAbility program will maintain its focus on supporting state and regional projects that increase the likelihood that individuals with disabilities and their families engaged in production agriculture (AgrAbility’s customers) will become more successful.

In FY 2015, the AgrAbility panel of experts reviewed seven proposals for new State AgrAbility Projects. NIFA expects to fund three of the seven proposals. Panel recommendations for the three new awards are being processed. NIFA expects to announce new awardees in August.

(I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE):

In FY 2015, the strategic plan is in full implementation phase with nearly 60 of the 74 eligible land-grant institutions joining voluntarily. In addition, 470 technology-based professional development events were hosted, 361 webinars conducted, 644 courses were available online, 266 technology-based professional development events were held, and another 51 events are planned this year.

A new Chief Executive Office (CEO) was hired, a new board of directors installed, and by-laws were revised. The strategic plan is in full implementation phase with nearly 58 of the 74 eligible land grant institutions joining.

CHILDREN, YOUTH, AND FAMILIES (CYFAR) COMBINED PROGRAMS (J), (U) & (V) :

(J) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (aka Youth at Risk and/or CYFAR);
(U) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP); and
(V) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP);

For the FY 2015 award cycle, $8,059,200.00 was available for CYFAR and CYFAR-SCP project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs.

A total of 21 academic institutions submitted applications. The rate of acceptance was 29%. In April 2015, an eight-member peer review panel evaluated these applications.

Funds were available to support a total of seven awards in the following project types:
one 4-H Military ($400,000);
41 Sustainable Community Projects ($6,160,000);
New Sustainable Community Projects ($640,000);
Professional Development and Technical Assistance ($850,000).

Funded projects should address one of the following CYFAR National Outcomes:
a) Early Childhood;
b) School Age;
c) Teens; or
d) Parent/Family.

(V) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk-Professional Development and Technical Assistance (aka CYFAR-PDTA):

For the FY 2015 award cycle, $850,000 was available for CYFAR-PDTA project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs. For this Professional Development and Technical Assistance (PDTA) award, one university was awarded this new continuation award.

The funded project is designed to address the professional development and technical assistance needs of the CYFAR SCP grantees.

The CYFAR PDTA Center serves as a mechanism to support the success of the CYFAR initiative through the development and provision of: Project Coaching, Proactive evaluation & technical assistance, and Resources and Tools. Strategic Leadership Team, Advisory Committee, and Subject Matter Experts serve as representatives across the land-grant system representative of 1862, 1890, 1994 and Hispanic-serving Institutions. The PDTA Center supports CYFERnet.org and CYFERnetSEARCH.org

(K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education-Professional Development (aka Chapter 3 and/or SARE-PD):

The FY 2015 Appropriations Act consolidated this funding line with the CFDA 10.215 funding line for Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (aka SARE Chapter 1 as initiated in FY 2014).

NOTES:
(1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.

(2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details.

(L) Federally- Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP):

In 2015, the FRTEP program was under the third year of a four-year continuation. NIFA awarded $2,917,440 to 36 projects. Awards ranged from $65,400 to $117,401.

A portion of the $117,401 award will be used to support all 36 schools with attendance at the annual project director’s conference held at the annual Inter-Tribal Ag Council in Las Vegas.

EXTENSION AT 1994 INSTITUTIONS COMBINED PROGRAMS (M) & (BB) :

(M) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and/or TCEP); and
(BB) Tribal Colleges Extension-Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE):

For FY 2015:
This grant program made 46 awards totaling $4,268,160 to 33 Land-Grant Institutions. These included 32 capacity projects and 14 special emphasis projects. A capacity grant funds an entire Extension department and a special emphasis grant supports pilot projects responding to community needs.

The total funds were split with extension capacity receiving $3,117,334 and special emphasis receiving $1,150,826. In addition, one of the two new 1994 Land Grants created by the 2014 Farm Bill received $60,000 to conduct a pilot extension project.

RENEWABLE RESOURCES EXTENSION ACT COMBINED PROGRAMS (N) & (O) :

(N) Renewable Resources Extension Act (aka RREA); and
(O) Renewable Resources Extension Act-National Focus Fund Projects (aka RREA-NFF):

The accomplishments for FY 2015 are expected to be similar to the impacts and accomplishments in FY 2014. RREA Capacity funds are being distributed to 72 land-grant institutions. These funds support extension programs that address the pressing and urgent issues facing rangeland and forestland resources and their owners and managers. Upon completion of the peer review panel in the 4th Quarter of FY 2015, the RREA-NFF will support four projects at a regional or national scale.

(P) Rural Health and Safety Education (Competitive) Grants Program (aka RHSE):

In FY 2015, approximately $1.4 million is available for this program. The proposed projects must not exceed $350,000 total for a two-year project period. Only one application per region (for a total of four) will be recommended for funding. All funded projects must have a strong project outcomes evaluation component.

Projects funded through the RHSE program in FY15 are expected to be health education projects that provide individuals and families living in rural areas with:
• Information as to the value of good health at any age;
• Information to increase individual or family’s motivation to take more responsibility for their own health;
• Information regarding rural environmental health issues that directly impact on human health;
• Information about and access to health promotion and educational activities; and
• Training for volunteers and health services providers concerning health promotion and health care services for individuals and families in cooperation with state, local, and community partners.

Proposed projects were expected to have a health education focus and Extension outreach strategy guided by an existing health framework/model (e.g., Cooperative Extension’s National Framework for Health and Wellness), as well as to identify health outcome indicators and lead to measurable changes in health knowledge, attitudes and behaviors for project participants.

Prospective applicants were also encouraged to coordinate efforts with state offices of rural health to avoid duplication of activities, partner with Regional Rural Development Centers on outcome indicators, measures, and communication of project impacts, and to enlist for their projects evaluators/individuals skilled in conducting program outcome evaluations and reporting.

Of the 14 proposals reviewed by the FY2015 RHSE panel, the regional distribution was as follows: two proposals from North East, three proposals from North Central, nine proposals from South, and no proposals from West. Processing of panel reviews and funding recommendations is currently under way.

The program expects to make four awards.

(Q) 1890 Facilities Grant Program and Tuskegee and (newly designated) Central State University (aka Section 1447):

The appropriated amount in FY 2015 is $19,730,000. Funds available to the states are $18,939,500. This level of funding will support on-going work under the 1890 Facilities program which was approved under each Institution’s five-year Plan of Work (2013-2017). Applications have been received from 19 Institutions. Awards will be made on or about September 30, 2016.

(R) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD):

For the FY 2015 award cycle, Congress appropriated $1,250,000 to support FARAD, which is funded under its own line item authority.

A total of four applications have been submitted. These applications are in the process of being merit reviewed internally by National Program Staff but recommendations for funding have not yet been determined as of the date of this report.

This 30-year-old high performing integrated consortium of collaborating institutions includes at each Land-Grant campus a lead PD and his/her respective scientific staff. The institutions involved are UC Davis, NCSU, UFL, and KSU.

The funding success ratio for this program in FY 2015 is not yet known.

FARAD is a university-based national program that serves as the primary source for scientifically-based recommendations regarding safe withdrawal intervals for drugs used off-label and for chemicals in food-producing animals. As such, FARAD is a key resource for protection of our nation's food supply, including meat, milk, and eggs, against accidental contamination of animal-derived foods with violative residues of drugs, pesticides, or other agents that could compromise food safety.

(S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development and/or RYD Grants Program):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(T) Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka ARPA, ERME and/or RME Program):

For FY 2015:
Actual numbers of projects funded and participants reached will be reported during the summer of 2016.

(U) – CYFAR-SCP and (V) – CYFAR-PDTA are part of the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS.

NOTE: See (J) - CYFAR above for pertinent details regarding the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS (J), (U) & (V).

(W) – AgrAbility is part of the COMBINED FARM SAFETY PROGRAMS.

NOTE: See (G) – Farm Safety and (H) – YFSEC above for pertinent details.

(X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (aka IPM-CS):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act:

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(Z) Military Family Readiness System (aka MFRS):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(AA) Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(BB) Tribal Colleges Extension Program- Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) – Programs Combined - See CFDA 10.500 (M) above.

(CC)District of Columbia Public Secondary Education Reorganization Act Program (CES-Formula):

For FY 2015:
In the Urban Families, Youth and Communities program area, the Land Grant Programs continue to sponsor community events in support of urban agriculture and urban sustainability such as the Quality of Life Day Festival and the Urban Agricultural Fair.

The Quality of Life Day Festival is held in various wards of the city and is a day-long activity that includes demonstrations, presentations, hands-on experiences, handouts, food, and fun for city residents.

The Urban Agricultural Fair is hosted at the Station's Muirkirk Research Farm in Beltsville, Maryland and is attended by participating DC Public Schools, grades four through seven. Students, along with teachers and parents, spend a day at the farm to learn more about their natural, built, and social environment.

Various stations are provided, including but not limited to: Wetlands on Wheels; Horticulture; Sustainable Agriculture; Water Quality and Research; Weather Station; Sustainable Communities; Youth Leadership; Nutrition and Health; Arts and Crafts; Marine Science; Basic Soils; and Junior Master Gardeners. The fair is held each year in mid-May.

In the Sustainable Energy program area, an experimental digestor was built that converts cow manure and agricultural waste into methane-rich biogas that can be used as alternate energy resources to generate electricity or thermal energy. The research in this study focuses on the feasibility of the design of an operational digestor; the monitoring and control of the different biodegradation process variables and experiments to boost or maximize the gas production; and the analysis of the biogas produced, using a Gas Chromatograph (CG) with Flame Ionization Detector (FID) to separate the methane from carbon dioxide.

The economic viability of this technology, advantages, and the production cost compared to other renewable energy resources are also compared. Technology will be promoted for community based sustainable energy projects in the District of Columbia. Fiscal Year 2016: For Fiscal Year 2016:

(A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [aka Smith-Lever 3 (b) & (c) Capacity (formerly known as “Formula”)] Grants Programs:

For FY 2016:
Anticipated funding is based on the FY 2015 allocation of $288,022,464. It is anticipated that funds will be awarded to land-grant institutions in each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Insular Areas.

(B) Cooperative Extension at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) – aka Smith-Lever Special Needs] Grants Program:

For FY 2016:
Anticipated funding is based on the FY 2015 allocation of $1,029,979. It is anticipated that funds will be awarded to land-grant institutions in the selected states within the country to fulfill a purpose or overcome a condition peculiar to the state as compared to the country as a whole, or for a purpose not normally a part of the continuing extension program.

(C) Smith-Lever Special Needs [Sections 3 (b) & ( c)] Competitive Grants Program:

For FY 2016:
Funding is projected at the FY 2015 level of approximately $462,000.

(D) Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions and (newly designated) Central State University (aka 1890 Capacity Building and/or CBG) Grants Program:

For FY 2016:
It is projected the program will be funded at the FY 2015 level of $43,920,000. Central State University, which gained 1890 Land-Grant Status in 2016, is eligible to receive funds under the program beginning this year, bringing the total institutions supported to 19.

It is anticipated that waivers will be requested from over 50 % of the institutions eligible under this program.

(E) Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) aka Smith-Lever 3d EFNEP and/or ENUT] Grants Program:

Historically EFNEP outcomes and impacts are consistent. In FY 2016, similar results are anticipated as those reported above for FY 2015.

(F) Regional Integrated Pest Management Competitive Grants Programs:

(F-1) North Central Region (aka NC-RIPM):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(F-2) Northeastern Region (aka NE-RIPM):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(F-3) Southern Region (aka S-RIPM):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(F-4) Western Region (aka W-RIPM):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

FARM SAFETY – COMBINED PROGRAMS (G), (H) & (W):

(G)Farm Safety;
(H)Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program (aka YFSEC); and
(W) Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -
National AgrAbility Project:

In FY 2016, the AgrAbility Program is projected to receive $4.6 million. All but approximately $300,000 of the funds are expected to go to support AgrAbility State and Regional Projects and National AgrAbility Project.

The $300,000 will support the YFSEC program. Final results from the two-year YFSEC project (Safety in Agriculture for Youth; funded in FY 2013 and FY 2014) are being reviewed to determination future funding priorities for this program.

(I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE):

The FY 2016 NTAE RFA was issued and three applications will be peer reviewed. The program plans to competitively award approximately $1.5 million to one eligible institution.

CHILDREN, YOUTH, AND FAMILIES (CYFAR) COMBINED PROGRAMS (J), (U) & (V) :

(J) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (aka Youth at Risk and/or CYFAR);
(U) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP); and
(V) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP);

For FY 2016:
Information is not yet available. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.

(K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education- Professional Development (aka Chapter 3 and/or SARE-PD):

It is anticipated that the FY 2016 appropriations will maintain the consolidation of this program with CFDA 10.215 which was initiated in FY 2014 and repeated in FY 2015.

NOTES:
(1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.

(2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details.

(L) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP):

For FY 2016:
Information is not yet available. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.

EXTENSION AT 1994 INSTITUTIONS COMBINED PROGRAMS (M) & (BB) :

(M) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and/or TCEP); and
(BB) Tribal Colleges Extension- Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE):

For 2016, the capacity programs will be under the third year of a four-year grant cycle. Special emphasis will begin a new, two-year grant cycle so there will be an RFA and a grant review panel to select recipients for the 2016-2018 grant cycle.

RENEWABLE RESOURCES EXTENSION ACT COMBINED PROGRAMS (N) & (O) :

(N) Renewable Resources Extension Act (aka RREA); and
(O) Renewable Resources Extension Act- National Focus Fund Projects (aka RREA-NFF):

For FY 2016:
The RREA Capacity and National Focus Funds programs will continue in FY 2016 at a level that is dependent on the appropriation from Congress. Capacity funds will be distributed to 73 institutions, including Central State University, the newest 1890 institution.

(P) Rural Health and Safety Education (Competitive) Grants Program (aka RHSE):

For FY 2016:
Information is not yet available. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.

(Q) 1890 Facilities Grant Program and Tuskegee and (newly designated) Central State University (aka Section 1447):

For FY 2016:
An RFA will be issued for Renewal Applications, which must be aligned to each Institution’s five-year Plan of Work (2013-2017). It is anticipated that the RFA will be issued on or before the 1st quarter of FY 2016.

It is projected that funding will remain at the FY 2015 level of approximately $19 million.

(R) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD):

For FY 2016:
No major shifts of responsibilities among the four collaborating universities is projected. Each network node is expected to continue to effectively accomplish its site-specific scientific and communication tasks and provide 24/7 expert-mediated hotline and internet-accessible data and services in support of the overall integrated network mission, as it did in 2015.

(S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development and/or RYD Grants Program):

For FY 2016:
The program will have ended and no funds will be available.

(T) Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka ARPA, ERME and/or RME Program):

For FY 2016:
It is estimated that $4.5 million will be available.

(U) – CYFAR-SCP and (V) – CYFAR-PDTA are part of the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS.

NOTE: See (J) - CYFAR above for pertinent details regarding the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS (J), (U) & (V).

(W) – AgrAbility is part of the COMBINED FARM SAFETY PROGRAMS.

NOTE: See (G) – Farm Safety and (H) – YFSEC above for pertinent details.

(X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (aka IPM-CS):
Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act:

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(Z) Military Family Readiness System (aka MFRS):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(AA)Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(BB)Tribal Colleges Extension Program- Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) – Programs Combined - See CFDA 10.500 (M) above.

(CC)District of Columbia Public Secondary Education Reorganization Act Program (CES-Formula):

For FY 2016, the projected areas of accomplishments remain the same as FY 2015.
Authorization
SPECIAL NOTES:
(1) Numerous Programs are funded under CFDA 10.500.
Most of the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) grants were issued under the general authority of the Secretary of Agriculture, pursuant to 7 U.S.C. 343 (d)
(2) Listed below are several programs, which are indicative of the types of projects currently funded under CFDA 10.500. However, please be advised that the listing is NOT exhaustive.

1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c):
(a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (aka 3b & c Capacity Grants - formerly known as Formula Funds)
Sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act provide funding for agricultural extension programs at 1862 Land-grant universities.

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs)
Sections 3(b)(1) and 8 of the Smith-Lever Act provide the basis of funding special needs agricultural extension programs at 1862 Land-grant institutions.

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program
Section 7129 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA), re-authorizes Section 3(b) & (c) of the Smith–Lever Act, allowing the Secretary of Agriculture, acting through the Director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), to conduct competitive grant programs to State Extension Services at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions to support innovative, education-based approaches to addressing emergency preparedness and specific responses related to natural and man-made disasters.

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement)
Funds available for distribution under the Smith-Lever Act, Section 3(b) and (c), statutory formula.

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement)
Federal funds are available for distribution under the Smith-Lever Act, Section 3(b) and (c), statutory formula.

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC
Sections 208 of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act provides, in pertinent part, that “In the administration of … the Act of August 30,1890 (7 U.S.C. 321-326, 328) (known as the Second Morrill Act), … the University [of the District of Columbia] shall be considered to be a university established for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts in accordance with the provisions of the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301-305, 307, 308) (known as the First Morrill Act); and the term "State", is used in the laws and provisions of law listed in the preceding, paragraphs of this section shall include the District of Columbia. … In the administration of the Act of May 8, 1914 (7 U.S.C. 341-346, 347a-349) (known as the Smith-Lever Act) … the University [of the District of Columbia] shall be considered to be a university established for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts in accordance with the provisions of the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301- 305, 307,308); and … the term "State" as used in such Act of May 8, 1949, shall include the District of Columbia, except that the District of Columbia shall not be eligible to receive any sums appropriated under section 3 of such Act. … In lieu of an authorization of appropriations for the District of Columbia under section 3 of such Act of May 8, 1914, there is authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary to provide cooperative agricultural extension work in the District of Columbia under such Act. Any reference in such Act (other than section 3 thereof) to funds appropriated under such Act shall in the case of the District of Columbia be considered a reference to funds appropriated under this subsection.”

Therefore, this grant funds the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending the University of the District of Columbia, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects.

Section 7417 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-234) amended section 208 of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act to eliminate any matching requirement for the extension formula funds provided to the University of the District of Columbia, effective October 1, 2008.

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and (newly designated) Central State University (Section 1444) (7 U.S.C. 3221)

Section 1444 of the National Agricultural Research,, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act Of 1977 (NARETPA), enacted as Title XIV of Public Law 95–113 (The Food and Agriculture Act of 1977) on Sept. 29, 1977, is also known as the Section 1444 Program. This law provides the basis for Federal funding for agricultural extension activities at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and Central State University.

3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):
(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education)
Section 3(d) of the Smith-Lever Act provides that the Secretary of Agriculture may fund extension work in the several States, Territories, and possessions. Section 1425 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (as amended) (7 U.S.C. 3175) provides the statutory formula for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). This program supports Federal funding for extension activities associated with disseminating the results of food and nutrition research performed or funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to enable low-income individuals and families to engage in nutritionally sound food purchase and preparation practices. Funding extends to EFNEP at State land-grant colleges established under the Morrill Act of July 2, 1862, as amended, and the Morrill Act of August 30, 1890, as amended, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University. Section 7116 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) amended Section 1425 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3175) to accomplish various goals as indicated in Part I.A. of the Capacity Grant Request for Application (Capacity RFA).

(b) Youth at Risk
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life Represents a new program:
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(d) Farm Safety
See 7 U.S.C. 343 (d). Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension
See 7 U.S.c. 343 (d). Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(f) Pest Management
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD)
Effective FY 2014 this Program was consolidated under Research. See CFDA 10.215 for pertinent details.

(h) Federally Recognized Tribes
See 7 U.S.C. 343 (d). Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification
See 7 U.S.C. 343 (d). Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(j) EIPM Support
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(k) EIPM Coordination
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act

The Renewable Resources Extension Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-306, 92 Stat. 349, 16 U.S.C. 1671 et seq.) provides for an expanded and comprehensive extension program for forest and rangeland renewable resources. The majority of the appropriated funds are distributed to eligible institutions based on a formula that considers the geographic extent, ecosystem productivity, economic contribution, and population for each state.

Since FY 2002, a small amount of these funds have been used to fund National Focus Fund Projects which have served to expand comprehensive extension programs for forest and rangeland renewable resources on a national, regional, or multi-institutional scale through better program coordination, innovative technologies, and extension models that can be easily duplicated.

(b) Rural Health and Safety
The authority for this program is under Section 502 (i) of Title V of the Rural Development Act of 1972, as amended (7 U.S.C. 2662). The Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 (Pub. L. 111-8) appropriates funds under Division A, Title I. The Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Program addresses the Individual and Family Health Education component of the authorization.

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions
This program is authorized under Section 534(b) of the Equity in Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 201 note), as amended by the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) (7 U.S.C. 7601). This section amends Section 3 of the Act of May 8, 1914 (Smith-Lever Act) (7 U.S.C. 341 et seq.), as amended. Under this authority, appropriated funds are to be awarded to the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions (hereinafter referred to as 1994 institutions) for Extension work and funds are to be distributed on the basis of a competitive application process.

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions
Title IV of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7630) authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to make grants to the Girl Scouts of the United States of America (GSUSA), the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), the National 4-H Council (4-H Council), and the National FFA Organization (FFA). Section 7309 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act (FCEA) of 2008 reauthorized 7 U.S.C. 7630, which was also amended to provide additional flexibility in content delivery to each organization receiving funds and to allow recipients to redistribute all or part of the funds to individual councils or local chapters without further need of approval from the Secretary. In FY 2009, Terms and Conditions of these awards should facilitate the redistribution without further need of approval. The Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 (Pub. L. 111-8) appropriates funds under Division A, Title I “for grants to youth organizations pursuant to 7 U.S.C. 7630.”

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD)
Title VI Section 604 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7642) states that -The Secretary of Agriculture shall continue operation of the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database program (referred to in this section as the “FARAD program”) through contracts, grants, or cooperative agreements with appropriate colleges or universities.

(f) Federal Administration
DIRECT APPROPRIATION

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447)

Pursuant to the authority contained in Section 1447 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (NARETPA) [7 U.S.C. 3222b], and reauthorized by Section 7123 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) (Pub. L. 110-246) grants will be awarded under the Facilities Grants Program to the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University. The Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 appropriates funds under Division A, Title I.

(h) Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnership Grants Program (aka ARPA and RME):

Section 133 of the Agricultural Risk Protection Act of 2000 (ARPA), (Pub. L. 106-224), amended the Federal Crop Insurance Act to add section 524(a)(3); [7 U.S.C. Section 1501 as amended by section 132(a) and section 524]; which requires the Secretary, acting through the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), to establish a competitive grants program for the purpose of educating agricultural producers about the full range of risk management activities.

Section 524(a) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act, 7 U.S.C. 1524(a) was further amended by Section 12026 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008, (FCEA)( Pub. L. 110-246), which requires that the Secretary place special emphasis on risk management strategies, education, and specifically targeted outreach.


, 7 U.S.C 341-349.
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
SPECIAL NOTE:
Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c):

(a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions 3b & c Capacity (formerly known as “formula”) Grants:

Applications may be submitted by the following 1862 Land-grant Institutions: Auburn University, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, American Samoa Community College, University of Arizona, University of Arkansas, University of California, Colorado State University, University of Connecticut, University of Delaware, University of Florida, University of Georgia, University of Guam, University of Hawaii, University of Idaho, University of Illinois, Purdue University, Iowa State University, Kansas State University, University of Kentucky, Louisiana State University, University of Maine, University of Maryland-College Park, University of Massachusetts, Michigan State University, College of Micronesia, University of Minnesota, Mississippi State University, University of Missouri, Montana State University, University of Nebraska, University of Nevada-Reno, University of New Hampshire, Rutgers University, New Mexico State University, Cornell University, North Carolina State University, North Dakota State University, Northern Marianas College, Ohio State University, Oklahoma State University, Oregon State University, Pennsylvania State University, University of Puerto Rico, University of Rhode Island, Clemson University, South Dakota State University, University of Tennessee, Texas A & M University, Utah State University, University of Vermont, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, University of the Virgin Islands, Washington State University, West Virginia University, University of Wisconsin, and University of Wyoming.

Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project.

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) :

Applications may be submitted by the following 1862 Land-grant Institutions: University of Alaska-Fairbanks, University of Arizona, Colorado State University, University of Idaho, Kansas State University, Montana State University, University of Nebraska, University of Nevada-Reno, New Mexico State University, North Dakota State University, Oregon State University, South Dakota State University, Texas A & M University, Utah State University, University of Vermont, and University of Wyoming.

Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project.

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program

Applications may be submitted with the approval of Extension Directors of 1862 Land-grant Institutions in the 50 states, American Samoa, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Marianas, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project. An applicant’s failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the time of an application deadline will result in NIFA not accepting the application or, even though an application may be reviewed, will preclude NIFA from making an award.

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement):

Fiscal Year 2014 represented the last year that NIFA published a RFA for the CSRS Retirement Program. .

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement):

Applications may be submitted by 1862 land-grant institutions that are making payments to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management for FERS retirement costs for the former Schedule A Appointments. See Appendix A of the Capacity Request for Applications (RFA) for the list of eligible institutions.

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC

The University of the District of Columbia, as the 1862 Land-Grant Institution, is the only applicant eligible for funding under the DCPPERA.

The award recipient may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project.

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444):

A. Eligible Applicants:

Applications may be submitted by 1890 Land-Grant Universities, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, that conduct agricultural extension activities in accordance with NARETPA section 1444(a)(1): Alabama A&M University; Tuskegee University; University of Arkansas - Pine Bluff; Delaware State University; Florida A&M University; Fort Valley State University; Kentucky State University; Southern University; University of Maryland – Eastern Shore; Alcorn State University; Lincoln University; North Carolina A & T State University; Langston University; South Carolina State University; Tennessee State University; Prairie View A&M University; Virginia State University; and West Virginia State University.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

Institutions may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project or activity.

3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):

(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education):

Applications may be submitted by State colleges and universities in accordance with Section 3(d) of the Smith-Lever Act: Auburn University; Alabama A & M University; Tuskegee University; University of Alaska; American Samoa Community College; University of Arizona; University of Arkansas; University of Arkansas – Pine Bluff; University of California; Colorado State University; University of Connecticut; University of Delaware; Delaware State University; University of the District of Columbia; University of Florida; Florida A & M University; University of Georgia; Fort Valley State University; University of Guam; University of Hawaii; University of Idaho; University of Illinois; Purdue University; Iowa State University; Kansas State University; University of Kentucky; Kentucky State University; Louisiana State University; Southern University; University of Maine; University of Maryland (College Park); University of Maryland (Eastern Shore); University of Massachusetts; Michigan State University; College of Micronesia; University of Minnesota; Mississippi State University; Alcorn State University; University of Missouri; Lincoln University; Montana State University; University of Nebraska; University of Nevada; University of New Hampshire; Rutgers University; New Mexico State University; Cornell University; North Carolina State University; North Carolina A & T University; North Dakota State University; Northern Marianas College; Ohio State University; Oklahoma State University; Langston University; Oregon State University; Pennsylvania State University; University of Puerto Rico; University of Rhode Island; Clemson University; South Carolina State University; South Dakota State University; University of Tennessee; Tennessee State University; Texas A&M University; Prairie View A & M University; Utah State University; University of Vermont; University of the Virgin Islands; Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Virginia State University; Washington State University; West Virginia University; West Virginia State University; University of Wisconsin; and University of Wyoming.

Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project.

(b) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR)
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(d) Farm Safety
NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated:
•Youth Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project.

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(f) Pest Management
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD)

NOTES:
(1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.
(2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details.

(h) Federally Recognized Tribes
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification

NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated:
•Youth Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project.

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.


(j) EIPM Support
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(k) EIPM Coordination
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.


4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA)

Applications may be submitted by 1862 and 1890 land-grant institutions.
Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project. An applicant’s failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the time of an application deadline will preclude NIFA from making an award.

(b) Rural Health and Safety (RHSE)

Land-grant colleges and universities that are eligible to receive funds under the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301 et seq.), and the Act of August 30, 1890 (7 U.S.C. 321 et seq.), including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and the University of the District of Columbia.

Applications may be submitted by any of the Tribal colleges and universities designated as 1994 Land-Grant Institutions under the Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994, as amended.

Award recipients may subward to other organizations provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project. Failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the application deadline will disqualify an applicant from consideration and will result in NIFA returning the application without review or, even though an application may be reviewed, will preclude NIFA from reviewing the application and making an award.

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions

Applications may be submitted by any of the Tribal colleges and universities designated as 1994 Land-Grant Institutions under the Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994, as amended.

Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of project goals and objectives. An applicant’s failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the time of an application deadline will result in NIFA returning the application without review or, even though an application may be reviewed, will preclude NIFA from making an award.

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (RYD)

Pursuant to 7 U.S.C. Section 7630, only the Girl Scouts of the United States of America, the National 4-H Council, the Boy Scouts of America, and the National FFA Organization are eligible to apply. NIFA will accept only one application from each organization. The application must be developed and submitted by the national office of each respective organization. Rural Youth Development awards will be distributed to each of the four (4) eligible organizations that submits an application in accordance with RFA requirements, if the application is found to be worthy of support through the peer review process. The amount awarded to each organization will be determined based on review and recommendations of a peer review panel.

Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project.

If an applicant fails to meet an eligibility criterion by the time of the application deadline, the application will be at risk of being excluded from NIFA review and will preclude NIFA from making an award.

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD)

The Secretary shall offer to enter into a contract, grant, or cooperative agreement with 1 or more appropriate colleges and universities to operate the FARAD program.

(f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION)
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447)

Eligible applicants under this RFA are the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University. They are: Alabama A&M University, Tuskegee University, University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff, Delaware State University, Florida A&M University, Fort Valley State University, Kentucky State University, Southern University, University of Maryland-Eastern Shore, Lincoln University, Alcorn State University, North Carolina A&T State University, Langston University, South Carolina State University, Tennessee State University, Prairie View A&M University, Virginia State University, and West Virginia State University.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.
Beneficiary Eligibility
Extension Programs at the State and county level are available to the general public.
Credentials/Documentation
SPECIAL NOTE:
Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM) - each applicant (unless excepted under 2 CFR § 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal awarding agency under 2 CFR § 25.110(d)) is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal awarding agency. It also must state that the Federal awarding agency may not make a Federal award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Federal awarding agency is ready to make a Federal award, the Federal awarding agency may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a Federal award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant.

Applicants must furnish the information required in the request for applications (RFAs). Successful applicants recommended for funding must furnish the information and assurances requested during the award documentation process. These include, but are not limited to the following:

Organizational Management Information - Specific management information relating to an applicant shall be submitted on a one time basis, with updates on an as needed basis, as part of the responsibility determination prior to the award of a grant identified under this RFA, if such information has not been provided previously under this or another NIFA program. NIFA will provide copies of forms recommended for use in fulfilling these requirements as part of the preaward process. Although an applicant may be eligible based on its status as one of these entities, there are factors which may exclude an applicant from receiving Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits under this program (e.g., debarment or suspension of an individual involved or a determination that an applicant is not responsible based on submitted organizational management information). This information collection is approved under OMB Circular Control No. 0524-0026, “Assurance of Compliance with the Department of Agriculture Regulations Assuring Civil Rights, Compliance and Organization Information.”. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
SPECIAL NOTE:
Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

All RFAs are published on the Agency’s website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process.

his program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.


GENERAL PERTINENT DETAILS:

1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c):
(a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [(aka 3b & c Capacity Funds), formerly known as "Formula" funds)]

Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to the Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. As noted in the Capacity Request for Applications (Capacity RFA), these application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.

Section 202 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require approved plans of work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1862 Land-grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1862 Land-grant Institution must submit both a 5-Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted each year as an update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due by April 1.

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) :

Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to Special Needs Program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. As noted in the Capacity Request for Applications (Capacity RFA), these application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.

Section 202 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require approved plans of work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1862 Land-grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1862 Land-grant Institution must submit both a 5-Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted each year as an update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due by April 1.

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program :

Pertinent info to be determined at a later date.

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement):

Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to the CSRS Retirement Contributions Program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. As noted in the Capacity Request for Applications (Capacity RFA), these application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) System, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.

Fiscal Year 2014 represented the last year that NIFA published a RFA for this program.

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement):

Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to the FERS Retirement Contributions Program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. As noted previously, these application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) System, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC:

Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to the DCPPERA program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. As noted in the Capacity Request for Applications (Capacity RFA), these application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.

Section 105 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require an approved Plan of Work for extension and research activities at 1862 Land-grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. As stated in the Preface to the Federal Register Notice at 71 FR 4107, “Although the District of Columbia receives extension funds under the District of Columbia Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act, Public Law 93–471, as opposed to the Smith-Lever Act, NIFA has determined that it should be subject to the POW requirements imposed under these guidelines except where expressly excluded.” Therefore, the University of the District of Columbia must submit both a 5-Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted as an annual update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due April 1.

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444):

Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to the Section 1444 Program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. These application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.

Section 225 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended NARETPA to require an approved Plan of Work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1890 land-grant institution, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, must submit both a 5-Year Plan of Work Update and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports are due April 1.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):
(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education):

No Standard Form (SF) 424-A, Budget Information for Non-Construction Programs, and no Budget Narrative Attachment Form are required for either the initial or the final submissions. However, the EFNEP-specific forms will be required.

Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to EFNEP as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. The SF-424M Application Package should include:
Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form (SF) 424M
(Mandatory)
NIFA Supplemental Information Form
Key Contacts Form

(b) Youth at Risk (CYFAR):
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(d) Farm Safety:
NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE):
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(f) Pest Management:
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD)

NOTE: Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.

See CFDA Number 10.215 for pertinent details.


(h) Federally Recognized Tribes:
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification:
NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(j) EIPM Support:
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(k) EIPM Coordination:
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA):
Application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system and the Research, Extension, and Education Project Online Reporting Tool (REEport), and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(b) Rural Health and Safety (RHSE):
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions:
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (RYD):
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD):
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION):
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447):

In accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . An environmental impact statement is required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Applications should be submitted as outlined in the Competitive and/or Capacity Request for Applications (RFA). Applications must follow the instructions provided per Grants.Gov and in the Agency guide to submitting applications via Grants.gov.
Award Procedure
SPECIAL NOTE:
Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

For Capacity Programs:
Application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system and the Research, Extension, and Education Project Online Reporting Tool (REEport), and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements.

Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA.

Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors:
(a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities;

(b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields;

(c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs;

(d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations;

(e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and

(f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application.

Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the Competitive and/or Capacity Request for Applications (RFA).

PERTINENT GENERAL DETAILS:

1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c):
(a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [(aka 3b & c Capacity Grants (formerly known as "Formula" Funds)]:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) :

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program :

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement):

Fiscal Year 2014 represented the last year that NIFA published a RFA for this program.

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444):

The Office of Planning and Accountability will notify the Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM), Awards Management Division (AMD), Capacity Grants Section and the institution regarding each institution’s compliance with the Plan of Work reporting requirements (i.e., Five (5) Year Plan of Work Update and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results). If all current program and administrative requirements have been met by the eligible institution, funding will continue to be released on a quarterly basis. The OGFM/AMD/Capacity Grants Section will notify the institutions when all requirements have been met or approved.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):

(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(b) Youth at Risk (CYFAR)”
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life:
Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .
.

(d) Farm Safety:
NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(f) Pest Management:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD):
NOTE: Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.

See CFDA Number 10.215 for pertinent details.

(h) Federally Recognized Tribes:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification:
NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(j) EIPM Support:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(k) EIPM Coordination:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(b) Rural Health and Safety:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (RYD):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(f) Federal Administration:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447):

In accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
From 30 to 60 days. Dates for specific deadlines are announced in the Competitive and/or Capacity Request for Applications (RFA), generally published for each fiscal year (FY).

Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. Respective links are provided below:
http://nifa.usda.gov/
http://www.grants.gov.
Appeals
Not Applicable.

2 CFR Part 200 – Subparts D & E apply to this program.
Renewals
Specific details are provided in the Competitive and/or Capacity Request for Applications (RFA), which generally published annually..
How are proposals selected?
Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Competitive and/or Capacity Request for Application (RFA).
How may assistance be used?
Section # 070 – USES ONLY (SEE BELOW FOR RESTRICTIONS):

SPECIAL NOTES:
(1) The majority of Cooperative Extension Service (CES) Programs are issued under the general authority of the Secretary of Agriculture [7 U.S.C. 343 (d)].
A synopsis of general uses is provided in the CFDA database.

(2) Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

(3) Although the information provided in the CFDA database is not exhaustive, NIFA attempts to also indicate “Exceptions” to the general uses.

GENERAL STATEMENTS REGARDING USES:

Grant funds must be used for allowable costs necessary to conduct approved integrated research, extension and education objectives to address food and agricultural sciences, in the broadest sense.

NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities.

For most of the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) programs, Indirect Costs are not allowable. (Pertinent details are provided for the few exceptions to the rule.)

DETAILED INFORMATION – USES ONLY

1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c):
(a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (formerly known as 3b & c Formula Funds):

Sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act provide funding for agricultural extension programs at 1862 Land-grant universities.

These funds are used by institutions eligible to receive funds under the Act of Congress approved July second, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, entitled ‘‘An Act donating public lands to the several States and Territories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts’’ (Twelfth Statutes at Large, page five hundred and three) (“1862 Land-grant Institutions”), for the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending or resident in 1862 Land-grant Institutions in the several communities, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects.

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) :

These funds are used to support extension activities identified in the eligible institution’s approved 5-Year Plan of Work. Special Needs funds are allocated to a State Cooperative Extension Service to fulfill a purpose or overcome a condition peculiar to the State, as compared to the country as a whole, or for a purpose not normally a part of the continuing extension program.

Funds are allocated under this program to a State Cooperative Extension Service to fulfill a purpose or overcome a condition peculiar to the State, as compared to the country as a whole, or for a purpose not normally a part of the continuing extension program.

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program :

There has been an increase in public awareness regarding the number and severity of disaster type critical incidents involving earthquakes, tsunamis, tornadoes, wildfire, drought, contagious disease, and terrorist events. The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Environment and Natural Resources and the Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction of the National Science and Technology Council have acknowledged the many effective roles that the Cooperative Extension System (CES) has played in disaster preparedness, response and remediation.

Within the states and territories, the CES has repeatedly served as the trusted community organization that has helped to enable families, communities, and businesses to successfully prepare for, respond to and cope with disaster losses and critical incidents. Once a disaster has occurred, the local extension outreach includes: 1) Communicating practical science-based risk information, 2) Developing relevant educational experiences and programs, 3) Working with individuals and communities to open new communication channels, and 4) Mitigating losses and facilitating recovery. Never was this more evident than after hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005 and during the 2008 Midwestern Summer flooding. During and after these incidents, local Extension agents served as a critical communication node throughout affected urban and rural areas, particularly when traditional communication systems were temporarily overwhelmed or destroyed.

The Extension Special Needs RFA encourages proposals that specifically address one or more of the following six key target areas:

1. Education and Technical assistance through inter-disciplinary and multi-state disaster training programs and demonstration projects for problem solving, especially those which build upon already existing strengths, contribute to or expand the EDEN and/or eXtension educational materials related to disaster preparation, mitigation, response and recovery;

2. Collaboration with Federal, state and local agencies and other disaster relief organizations to support education and service activities that enhance recovery of impacted rural communities, schools, businesses and agricultural-based activities;

3. Long range family, community and regional planning projects that will enhance implementation of programs that serve public needs in preparation for, during and after emergency situations within impacted States and across impacted regions;

4. Communication delivery of key information that meets end-users’ needs in a timely fashion with consideration of potentially limited communication channels due to disaster situations;

5. Dissemination of credible, science-based information that is reliable and easily accessible even if electronic access is compromised; and

6. Integrated Research and Extension Planning Projects (up to $15,000) are intended to provide assistance to applicants in bringing together teams for the development of highly competitive grant proposals where extension personnel would apply for large grants (in excess of $250,000) from other grant programs (e.g., the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative and etc…) and lead nationally important disaster prevention, protection and mitigation projects.

Fundable projects should support education and extension activities which:

1. Reduce risk through planning, disaster preparedness and emergency response by improving communication between the public, community leaders, state and Federal agencies;

2. Develop strategies and educational materials and/or programming in the area of emergency planning, infrastructure design and disaster recovery operation;

3. Develop community networks that provide real-time disaster education information; and/or

4. Develop or expand educational materials regarding disaster issues suitable for use and distribution by the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN) or the eXtension Community of Practice working with disaster planning.

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement):

These grants are used to defray the CSRS Retirement costs to the 1862 land-grant institutions for the former Schedule A Appointments who conduct agricultural extension work.

Funds are provided for the retirement costs of the former Schedule A Appointments at the 1862 land-grant institutions. These funds are allocated based on each institution’s relative share of the total payments to OPM during the previous year.

The separate allocation of funds for this purpose is being phased out over a 10-year period, beginning in FY 2007. The amount available for this program is reduced each fiscal year by $1,473,658 and the same amount is added to the funds available for distribution under the Smith-Lever Act, Section 3(b) and (c), statutory formula.

The Schedule A 213.3113 (a) (1) was issued by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to employ individuals in the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) as a joint appointment between USDA and the land grant institution. The official title of Schedule A appointees includes the title Agent (e.g., Agent/Cooperative Extension Director; Agent/Cooperative Extension Educator) as by law only agents with a Schedule A appointment were eligible to participate in the Federal benefit plan(s).

Employment is dependent upon an individual’s appointment in the CES at the university. The appointment must be a regular position with at least 50 percent of the staff’s time dedicated to extension projects, and the appointee must work and be paid over a 12-month period.

Agents in the Cooperative Extension program are not classified under the General Schedule (GS) classification system or any other Federal pay system. The positions are classified by the employing land grant institution, and the salary is established according to policies and procedures at the institution.

The OPM has the authority and responsibility for issuing rules and regulations covering Schedule A appointments and resulting benefits. OPM has delegated to the USDA the responsibility for overseeing and managing Cooperative Extension Schedule A appointments and the accompanying Federal benefits, (e.g., retirement and insurance plans). The Human Resources Division (HRD)/Cooperative Extension Service (CES) Team within Administrative and Financial Management (AFM) of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) carries out this function for USDA.

Effective January 31, 2003, the authority to grant Schedule A Excepted Appointments to CES employees was terminated. Public Law 107-171, Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, dated May 13, 2002, Section 7220, terminated the Schedule A appointing authority used by USDA to grant a companion Federal appointment and Federal benefits to state/university employees of the Cooperative Extension Service. The law allowed the CES Federal appointees that were employed on the day before the date of the enactment of the Act, (i.e., May 12, 2002) to: a) continue to accrue Federal creditable service for retirement; and b) participate in the following benefits as long as the employees continued their employment with the Cooperative Extension Service:
1) The Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHB);
2) The Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance Program (FEGLI);
3) The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS);
4) The Federal Employee Retirement System (CSRS);
5) The Thrift Savings Plan (TSP); and
6) The Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP).

The Federal Office of Workers Compensation Program (OWCP) is the only Federal program that will not continue as it is not a program that the dual appointee was vested in. Claims already on file with the Department of Labor (DOL) Office of Workers Compensation Office will continue to be processed by the DOL. Using a formula based in the prior year’s injury or illness claims, NIFA will pay these claims on behalf of each institution and charge that institution by reducing its annual retirement allocation by the amount remitted. If the amount of claims paid exceeds the institution’s annual retirement allocation, NIFA will bill the institution for any OWCP costs in excess of the annual retirement allocation.

Changes and new features for the current Federal Benefits programs such as FEHB, FELGI, TSP and FLTCIP will be offered to the CES organizations and employees that are eligible to participate in the affected program(s). However, former Federal appointees cannot participate in new Federal benefit programs that were not in effect as of May 12, 2002.

Effective January 31, 2003, CES can no longer grant Schedule A Federal appointments to new employees because they no longer have a Federal appointment authority available to make new Federal appointments. Former CES Schedule A appointees may be reappointed to another CES organization and continue their benefits as long as they do not have a break in service.

Fiscal Year 2014 represented the last year that NIFA published a RFA for this program.

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement):

Federal funds are provided for the retirement costs of the former Schedule A Appointments at the 1862 land-grant institutions. These funds are allocated to the 1862 land-grant institutions with former Schedule A Appointments based on each institution’s relative share of the total payments to OPM during the previous year.

The separate allocation of funds for this purpose is being phased out over a 10-year period, beginning in FY 2008. The amount available for this program is reduced each year by $376,826 and this same amount is added to the funds available for distribution under the Smith-Lever Act, Section 3(b) and (c), statutory formula.

The Schedule A 213.3113 (a) (1) was issued by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to employ individuals in the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) as a joint appointment between USDA and the land-grant institution. The official title of Schedule A appointees includes the title Agent (e.g., Agent/Cooperative Extension Director; Agent/Cooperative Extension Educator) as by law only agents with a Schedule A appointment were eligible to participate in the Federal benefit plan(s).

Employment is dependent upon an individual’s appointment in the CES at the university. The appointment must be a regular position with at least 50 percent of the staff’s time dedicated to extension projects, and the appointee must work and be paid over a 12 month period.

Agents in the Cooperative Extension program are not classified under the General Schedule (GS) classification system or any other Federal pay system. The positions are classified by the employing land-grant institution, and the salary is established according to policies and procedures at the institution.

The OPM has the authority and responsibility for issuing rules and regulations covering Schedule A appointments and resulting benefits. OPM has delegated to the USDA the responsibility for overseeing and managing Cooperative Extension Schedule A appointments and the accompanying Federal benefits, (e.g., retirement and insurance plans). The Human Resources Division (HRD)/Cooperative Extension Service (CES) Team with Administrative and Financial Management (AFM) of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) carries out this function for USDA.

Effective January 31, 2003, the authority to grant Schedule A Excepted Appointments to CES employees was terminated. Public Law 107-171, Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, dated May 13, 2002, Section 7220, terminated the Schedule A appointing authority used by USDA to grant a companion Federal appointment and Federal benefits to state/university employees of the Cooperative Extension Service. The law allowed the CES Federal appointees that were employed on the day before the date of the enactment of the Act, (i.e., May 12, 2002), to: a) continue to accrue Federal creditable service for retirement; and b) participate in the following benefits as long as the employees continued their employment with the Cooperative Extension Service:

1) The Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHB);
2) The Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance Program (FEGLI);
3) The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS);
4) The Federal Employee Retirement System (FERS);
5) The Thrift Savings Plan (TSP); and
6) The Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP).

The Federal Office of Workers Compensation Program (OWCP) is the only Federal program that will not continue as it is not a program that the dual appointee was vested in. Claims already on file with the Department of Labor (DOL) Office of Workers Compensation Office will continue to be processed by the DOL. Using a formula based in the prior year’s injury or illness claims, NIFA will pay these claims on behalf of each institution and charge that institution by reducing its annual retirement allocation by the amount remitted. If the amount of claims paid exceeds the institution’s annual retirement allocation, NIFA will bill the institution for any OWCP costs in excess of the annual retirement allocation.

Changes and new features for the current Federal Benefits programs such as FEHB, FELGI, TSP and FLTCIP will be offered to the CES organizations and employees that are eligible to participate in the affected program(s). However, former Federal appointees cannot participate in new Federal benefit programs that were not in effect as of May 12, 2002.

Effective January 31, 2003, CES can no longer grant Schedule A Federal appointments to new employees because they no longer have a Federal appointment authority available to make new Federal appointments. Former CES Schedule A appointees may be reappointed to another CES organization and continue their benefits as long as they do not have a break in service.

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC:

These funds are used by the University of the District of Columbia for the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending the University of the District of Columbia, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects.

Sections 208 of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act provides, in pertinent part, that “In the administration of … the Act of August 30,1890 (7 U.S.C. 321-326, 328) (known as the Second Morrill Act), … the University [of the District of Columbia] shall be considered to be a university established for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts in accordance with the provisions of the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301-305, 307, 308) (known as the First Morrill Act); and the term "State", is used in the laws and provisions of law listed in the preceding, paragraphs of this section shall include the District of Columbia. … In the administration of the Act of May 8, 1914 (7 U.S.C. 341-346, 347a-349) (known as the Smith-Lever Act) … the University [of the District of Columbia] shall be considered to be a university established for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts in accordance with the provisions of the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301- 305, 307,308); and … the term "State" as used in such Act of May 8, 1949, shall include the District of Columbia, except that the District of Columbia shall not be eligible to receive any sums appropriated under section 3 of such Act. … In lieu of an authorization of appropriations for the District of Columbia under section 3 of such Act of May 8, 1914, there is authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary to provide cooperative agricultural extension work in the District of Columbia under such Act. Any reference in such Act (other than section 3 thereof) to funds appropriated under such Act shall in the case of the District of Columbia be considered a reference to funds appropriated under this subsection.”

Therefore, this grant funds the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending the University of the District of Columbia, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects.

Section 7417 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-234) amended section 208 of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act to eliminate any matching requirement for the extension formula funds provided to the University of the District of Columbia, effective October 1, 2008.

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444):

Funds appropriated under this section shall be used for expenses of conducting extension programs and activities, and for contributing to the retirement of employees subject to the provisions of the Act of March 4, 1940 (54 Stat. 30–40, as amended; 7 U.S.C. 331). No portion of the funds allocated under this grant will be applied, directly or indirectly, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or buildings, or the purchase or rental of land, or in college course teaching, lectures in college, or any other purpose not specified in NARETPA section 1444.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):

(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education):

Section 3(d) of the Smith-Lever Act provides that the Secretary of Agriculture may fund extension work in the several States, Territories, and possessions. Section 1425 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (as amended) (7 U.S.C. 3175) provides the statutory formula for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). This program supports Federal funding for extension activities associated with disseminating the results of food and nutrition research performed or funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to enable low-income individuals and families to engage in nutritionally sound food purchase and preparation practices. Funding extends to EFNEP at State land-grant colleges established under the Morrill Act of July 2, 1862, as amended, and the Morrill Act of August 30, 1890, as amended, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University.

(b) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR)
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(d) Farm Safety
NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated:
•Youth Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project.

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension)
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(f) Pest Management
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD aka Chapter 1)
NOTES:
(1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.
(2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details.


(h) Federally Recognized Tribes
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification
NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated:
•Youth Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project.

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(j) EIPM Support
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(k) EIPM Coordination
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.


4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act

Renewable Resources Extension Act-National Focus Fund Projects provide for expanded and comprehensive extension programs for forest and rangeland renewable resources programs at a national, regional, or multi-institutional level.

Since FY 2002, a small amount of these funds have been used to fund National Focus Fund Projects which have served to expand comprehensive extension programs for forest and rangeland renewable resources on a national, regional, or multi-institutional scale through better program coordination, innovative technologies, and extension models that can be easily duplicated.

(b) Rural Health and Safety

The Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program is designed to meet national goals for addressing the health and access needs of rural Americans. Rural Health and Safety Education Programs will focus on issues related to aging in one or more of three areas: 1) population aging in rural areas; 2) eldercare or caregiving and its impact on rural and farm families; and/or 3) related issues of rural health care to provide older individuals and families with:
• Information as to the value of good health in an era of population aging;
• Information to increase the older adult individual or family’s motivation take more responsibility for their own health;
• Access by older adults to health promotion and educational activities;
• Trained health and allied health professionals or paraprofessionals committed to rural health and care of aging population; and
• Training for volunteers and health services providers concerning health promotion and
health care services for rural older adult populations, in cooperation with the Department of
Health and Human Services.

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions

The Tribal Colleges Extension Program (TCEP) provides funding for the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions to conduct non-formal education and outreach activities to help meet the needs of the Native American people. Appropriated funds are to be awarded to the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions for Extension work and funds are to be distributed on the basis of a competitive application process.

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development or RYD Grants)

The Rural Youth Development Grants (RYD) Program supports the expansion of effective, high quality youth development programs for youth in rural areas and small towns. The overarching theme of this grant program is “Youth Build Strong Rural Communities.” The sub-theme is “Rural youth learn and apply leadership, citizenship, and life skills to improve their own lives and the communities in which they live.” This philosophy undergirds the program design and methodologies of this grant program.

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD)
No specific information provided

(f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION)
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447)

Facilities awards will be made for the acquisition and improvement of agricultural and food sciences facilities and equipment, including libraries, so that the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University may participate fully in the production of human capital in the food and agricultural sciences. Priorities for the eligible institutions are set in the facilities plan that is submitted to NIFA for review and approval.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

(h) Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnerships Grants Program (aka ARPA, ERME & RME):

The Secretary, acting through NIFA, is required to establish a competitive grants program for the purpose of educating agricultural producers about the full range of risk management activities. These activities include futures, options, agricultural trade options, crop insurance, cash forward contracting, debt reduction, production diversification, marketing plans and tactics, farm resources risk reduction, and other appropriate risk management strategies. The Risk Management Education (RME) program brings the existing knowledge base to bear on risk management issues faced by agricultural producers and expands the program throughout the Nation on a regional and multi-regional basis. Section :070 – RESTRICTIONS ONLY (SEE ABOVE FOR USES):

SPECIAL NOTES:
(1) A synopsis of general restrictions is provided in the CFDA database.

(2) Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

(3) Although the information provided in the CFDA database is not exhaustive, NIFA attempts to also indicate “Exceptions” to the general restrictions.

NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities.

Funds may not be used for any purposes other than those approved in the grant award documents.

Tuition remission is not allowable.

For most of the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) programs, Indirect costs are not allowable. Pertinent details are provided for the few exceptions to the rule.

OTHER - DETAILED INFORMATION – RESTRICTIONS ONLY

SPECIAL NOTE:
For most of the extension programs, Indirect Cost is NOT allowable and Matching is NOT required. Exceptions to the general rule are indicated, as deemed necessary and appropriate.

1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c):

(a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (formerly known as 3b & c Formula Funds) - - Funding Restrictions:

(1) Program and Extension Activities:
Smith-Lever Act sections 3(b) and 3(c) Federal funding must be used for extension programs and activities as identified in the institution’s approved 5-Year Plan of Work.

(2) Matching:
Section 3(e)(1) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. §343(e)(1))states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for cooperative extension work.” However, section 3(e)(4) of the Smith-Lever Act (& U.S.C. §343(e)(4)) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirement of paragraph (1), the insular areas of [American Samoa,] the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, [Micronesia, the Northern Mariana Islands,] and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than 50 percent of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section..... The Secretary may waive the matching fund requirement [of 50 percent] for any fiscal year if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year.”

NIFA may consider and approve matching waivers submitted by Insular 1862 Land-grant Institutions (American Samoa, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Marianas Islands, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands).

(3) Indirect Costs and Tuition Remission:
In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as Sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act capacity (formerly known as "formula") grant expenditures.

(4) Other Restrictions:

No portion of these funds may be applied, directly or indirectly, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or buildings, or the purchase or rental of land, or in college-course teaching, lectures in college, or any other purpose not specified in this Act.

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) - - Funding Restrictions:

(1) Approved NIFA Special Needs Projects:
Special Needs Federal funding must be used on extension activities identified in the institution’s approved 5-Year Plan of Work.

(2) Matching:
The Special Needs program requires that Federal funds be fully matched (i.e., 100 percent) by 1862 Land-grant Institutions.

(3) Indirect Costs and Tuition Remission:
In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. §3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as Special Needs capacity (formerly known as "formula") grant expenditures.

(4) Other Restrictions :
No portion of Federal funds allotted under Special Needs grant may be applied, directly or indirectly, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or buildings, or the purchase or rental of land, or in college-course teaching, lectures in college, or any other purpose not specified in the Smith-Lever Act.

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program - - Funding Restrictions:

Indirect costs and tuition remission are not allowable and no funds will be approved for these purposes. Costs that are a part of the institution’s indirect cost pool may not be reclassified as direct costs for the purpose of making them allowable.

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement):

Funding Restrictions:

(1) Approved NIFA CSRS Retirement Contributions Program Costs
NIFA CSRS retirement allocations must be used to support CSRS retirement costs for former Schedule A Appointments.

(2) Matching:
Section 3(e)(1) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. §343(e)(1) states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for cooperative extension work.” However, section 3(e)(4) of the Smith-Lever Act (U.S.C. §343(e)(4) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirements of paragraph (1), the insular areas of [American Samoa,] the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, [Micronesia, the Northern Marians Islands,] and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than 50 percent of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section. The Secretary my waive the matching fund requirement [of 50 percent] for any fiscal year if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year.”
NIFA may consider and approve matching waivers submitted by 1862 land-grant Institutions in insular areas.

Please note that these matching funds may be used for any extension activity identified in the state plan of work.

(3) Indirect Costs and Tuition Remission:
In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. §3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as CSRS retirement contribution capacity (formerly known as " formula") grant expenditures.

Fiscal Year 2014 represented the last year that NIFA published a RFA for this program.

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement) - - Funding Restrictions:

(1) Approved NIFA FERS Retirement Contributions Programs:
NIFA FERS retirement allocations must be used to support FERS retirement costs for former Schedule A Appointments.

(2) Matching:
Section 3(e)(1) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. §343(e)(1) states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for cooperative extension work.” However, section 3(e)(4) of the Smith-Lever Act (U.S.C. §343(e)(4) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirements of paragraph (1), the insular areas of [American Samoa,] the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, [Micronesia, the Northern Marians Islands,] and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than 50 percent of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section. The Secretary my waive the matching fund requirement [of 50 percent] for any fiscal year if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year.”

NIFA may consider and approve matching waivers submitted by 1862 land-grant Institutions in insular areas.

Please note that these matching funds may be used for any extension activity identified in the state plan of work.

(3) Indirect Costs and Tuition Remission:
In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. §3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as FERS retirement contribution capacity (formerly known as "formula:) grant expenditures.

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC - - Funding Restrictions:

(1) Approved NIFA DCPPERA Projects:
DCPPERA Federal funding must be used to support extension activities identified in the approved 5-Year Plan of Work.

(2) Matching:
There is no matching requirement for these funds.

(3) Indirect Costs and Tuition Remission:
In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as DCPPERA capacity (formerly known as “formula”) grant expenditures.

(4) Other Restrictions:
No portion of these funds may be applied, directly or indirectly, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or buildings, or the purchase or rental of land, or in college-course teaching, lectures in college, or any other purpose not specified in this Act.

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444) - - Funding Restrictions:


(1) Approved NIFA Section 1444 Projects :
Section 1444 Program funding must be used to support agricultural extension activities identified in the approved 5-Year Plan of Work.

(2) Matching:
NARETPA section 1449 (7 U.S.C. 3222d) states that “the State shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources. Such matching funds shall be for an amount equal to not less than ... 100 percent of the formula [grant] funds to be distributed to the eligible institution for fiscal year 2007 and each fiscal year thereafter. ... Notwithstanding [redistributing the funds], the Secretary may waive the matching funds requirement ... above the 50 percent level for any fiscal year for an eligible institution of a State if the Secretary determines that the State will be unlikely to satisfy the matching requirement.”

7 CFR 3419.1 defines “matching funds” as “funds from non-Federal sources made available by the State to the eligible institutions ... [for] programs or activities that fall within the purposes of agricultural research and cooperative extension under sections 1444 and 1445 of NARETPA ... or [for] qualifying educational activities. Matching funds means cash contributions and excludes in-kind matching contributions.” It defines “non-Federal sources” as “funds made available by the State to the eligible institution either through direct appropriation or under any authority (other than authority to charge tuition and fees paid by students) provided by a State to an eligible institution to raise revenue, such as gift acceptance authority or user fees.” Finally, it defines “qualifying educational activities” as “programs that address food and agricultural sciences components of an eligible institution.”

7 CFR 3419.6 states that “The required matching funds for the formula programs shall be used by an eligible institution for agricultural research and extension activities that have been approved in the plan of work required under sections 1444(d) and 1445(c) of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977... or for .. qualifying education activities.”

Please note that while Federal funds must be expended on agricultural extension, the matching funds may be used for agricultural research, agricultural extension, or qualifying educational activities. NIFA may consider and approve matching waivers above the 50 percent level. See Part IV.B.6. for additional information.

(3) Indirect Costs and Tuition Remission:
In accordance with NARETPA section 1473, indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as Section 1444 Program capacity (formerly known as “formula”) grant expenditures.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):
(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education) - - Funding Restrictions :

(1) Approved NIFA EFNEP Projects:
EFNEP Federal funding must be used on NIFA approved EFNEP projects.

(2) Matching:
There is no cost-sharing or matching requirement for this program.

(3) Indirect Costs and Tuition Remission:

In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as EFNEP capacity (formerly known as “formula”) grant expenditures.

(b) Children, Youth and Families at Risk (CYFAR)

In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable grant expenditures.

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(d) Farm Safety

NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated:
•Youth Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project.

In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable grant expenditures.

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension
In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as capacity (formerly known as “formula”) grant expenditures.

(f) Pest Management
In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as capacity (formerly known as “formula”) grant expenditures.

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD aka Chapter 1)

NOTES:
(1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.
(2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details.

(h) Federally Recognized Tribes

In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable as capacity (formerly known as “formula”) grant expenditures.

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification

NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated:
•Youth Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project.

In accordance with section 1473 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319), indirect costs and tuition remission are unallowable grant expenditures.

(j) EIPM Support
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(k) EIPM Coordination
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.


4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES - - Funding Restrictions:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA)

The majority of the appropriated funds are distributed to eligible institutions based on a formula that considers the geographic extent, ecosystem productivity, economic contribution, and population for each state.

Since FY 2002, a small amount of these funds have been used to fund National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF).

NIFA does not require matching support for this program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

For Fiscal Year 2014 appropriated funds, Section 716 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (HR 3547 – Pub.L. 113-76) stipulates that indirect costs are not to exceed 30% of total Federal Funds provided under each award.

(b) Rural Health and Safety

The Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program provides funds to meet national goals for addressing the health and access needs of rural Americans.

NIFA does not require matching or cost sharing support for this program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities.

For Fiscal Year 2014 appropriated funds, Section 716 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (HR 3547 – Pub.L. 113-76) stipulates that indirect costs are not to exceed 30% of total Federal Funds provided under each award.

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions

Appropriated funds are to be awarded to the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions for Extension work and funds are to be distributed on the basis of a competitive application process.

NIFA does not require matching support for this program, and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

Under the TCEP, the use of grant funds to plan, acquire, or construct a building or facility, or to acquire land, is not allowed. With prior approval, in accordance with the cost principles set forth in OMB Circular No. A-21, grant funds may be used to purchase equipment, or for improvements, alterations, renovations, or repairs to land, buildings, or equipment, deemed necessary to retrofit existing spaces and resources in order to carry out a funded project under this grant. However, requests to use grant funds for such purposes must demonstrate that such expenditures are incidental to the major purpose for which the grant request is made and no more than twenty-five percent of the project budget may be used to purchase equipment. Any equipment purchased with Federal funds is the property of the grantee or the subgrantee, as appropriate.

Indirect costs are unallowable costs, and no funds will be approved for this purpose. Costs that are a part of the institution’s indirect cost pool may not be reclassified as direct costs for the purpose of making them allowable.

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development or RYD Grants)

Title IV of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7630) authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to make grants to the Girl Scouts of the United States of America (GSUSA), the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), the National 4-H Council (4-H Council), and the National FFA Organization (FFA). Section 7309 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act (FCEA) of 2008 reauthorized 7 U.S.C. 7630, which was also amended to provide additional flexibility in content delivery to each organization receiving funds and to allow recipients to redistribute all or part of the funds to individual councils or local chapters without further need of approval from the Secretary. In FY 2009, Terms and Conditions of these awards should facilitate the redistribution without further need of approval. The Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 (Pub. L. 111-8) appropriates funds under Division A, Title I “for grants to youth organizations pursuant to 7 U.S.C. 7630.”

There are no matching requirements associated with the Rural Youth Development program, and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of facility space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities.

For Fiscal Year 2014 appropriated funds, Section 716 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (HR 3547 – Pub.L. 113-76) stipulates that indirect costs are not to exceed 30% of total Federal Funds provided under each award.

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD)

Pursuant to Sec. 604 of the Agricultural research extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 [7 USC 7642(d)], applicants requesting recovery of indirect costs should limit their requests to the lesser of their institution’s official negotiated indirect costs rate or the equivalent of 19 percent of total Federal funds awarded.

(f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION) - Extension Activities

Section 720 of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2012 (Pub.L. No. 112-55) limits indirect costs to 30 percent of the total Federal funds provided under each award. Therefore, when preparing budgets, applicants should limit their requests for recovery of indirect costs to the lesser of their institution’s official negotiated indirect cost rate or the equivalent of 30 percent of total Federal funds awarded.

Other pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447):

In Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 NIFA assessed four percent (4%) of the appropriated amount for Federal Administration, distributed sixty percent (60%) of the balance equally, and distributed the remaining forty percent (40%) based on the formula found in Section 1444 of NAREPTA of 1977, as amended (Pub. L. No. 95-113).

Within each institution, the research, teaching and extension programs must each receive at least 20 percent of the annual allocation. The remaining 40 percent may be allocated based on institutional needs for research, teaching, or extension. No more than 60 percent of the total allocation should be directed to research, teaching, or extension. However, if there are unique situations in your institution which warrant a deviation from these guidelines, we will consider requests for reallocation. Such reallocations must be justified by the submission of a situation statement which describes the research, teaching, and extension facilities needs in your institution and how previously available Federal funds were utilized.

NIFA does not require matching support for this program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

The obligation and expenditure of funds awarded under these grants are limited to equipment, land, buildings and other related costs which are or will be used in the administration and conduct of approved research, teaching and extension activities.

In accordance with NARETPA Section 1447 (e), funds provided for this program may not be used for the payment of any overhead costs of the eligible institutions.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

(h) Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnerships Grants Program (aka ARPA, ERME & RME)

For Fiscal Year 2014 appropriated funds, Section 716 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (HR 3547 – Pub.L. 113-76) stipulates that indirect costs are not to exceed 30% of total Federal Funds provided under each award.

Other pertinent details will be provided at a future date. Some funds are Fully Discretionary. Some funds are Mandatory. Some funds are formula-based.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
SPECIAL NOTE:
Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects.

Further, the details of the reporting requirements are included in the Award Terms and Conditions.

1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c):

(a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [(aka 3b & c Capacity grants, (formerly known as "Formula" Funds)]:

The Plan of Work Update and Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results were due by April 1, and should have been submitted online at the web address: http://pow.nifa.usda.gov.
Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

Financial reporting via the SF-425, Federal Financial Report is due to the Capacity Grants Branch, Awards Management Division (AMD) of the Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) on April 1st of each year until the capacity grant is closed.

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) :

The Plan of Work Update and Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results were due April 1, and should have been submitted online at the web address: http://pow.nifa.usda.gov.

Financial reporting via the SF-425, Federal Financial Report is due to the Capacity Grants Branch, Awards Management Division (AMD) of the Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) on April 1st of each year until the capacity grant is closed.

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program :

(NOTE: Expected Outcomes and Reporting Requirements are NOT reflected in the RFA. Hence, standard reporting will be utilized.)

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement):

Financial reporting via the SF-425, Federal Financial Report is due to the Capacity Grants Branch, Awards Management Division (AMD) of the Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) on April 1st of each year until the capacity grant is closed.

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement) :

Financial reporting via the SF-425, Federal Financial Report is due to the Capacity Grants Branch, Awards Management Division (AMD) of the Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) on April 1st of each year until the capacity grant is closed.

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC:

The Plan of Work Update and Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results must be submitted by April 1, online at the web address: http://pow.nifa.usda.gov.

Form NIFA-REPT (Revised) Supplement to Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results, Multistate Extension Activities and Integrated Activities, should have been submitted to the OGFM Capacity Grants Section by April 1, for each fiscal year (FY).

Financial reporting via the SF-425, Federal Financial Report is due to the Capacity Grants Branch, Awards Management Division (AMD) of the Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) on April 1st of each year until the capacity grant is closed.

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444):

The Plan of Work Update and Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results should have been submitted by April 1, 2009 online at the web address: http://pow.nifa.usda.gov.

Financial reporting via the SF-425, Federal Financial Report is due to the Capacity Grants Branch, Awards Management Division (AMD) of the Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) on April 1st of each year until the capacity grant is closed.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):

(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education):

States must provide a state program report, using the State Reporting System version 5 (SRS5) which was due November 1.

Financial reporting via the SF-425, Federal Financial Report is due to the Capacity Grants Branch, Awards Management Division (AMD) of the Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) on April 1st of each year until the capacity grant is closed.

(b) Youth at Risk (CYFAR):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(d) Farm Safety:
NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(f) Pest Management:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD):

NOTE: Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.

See CFDA Number 10.215 for pertinent details.

(h) Federally Recognized Tribes:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification:

NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(j) EIPM Support:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(k) EIPM Coordination:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA):

Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

Additionally, when the project is complete, the grantee is required to submit a Final Technical Report to the NIFA National Program Leaders, Renewable Resources Extension Act. The Final Technical Report should summarize all work conducted and detail the outcomes, accomplishments and outputs of the funded project. This report should not exceed 15 single-spaced, typed pages.

At a minimum, Project Directors are expected to attend and present their projects and accomplishments as submitted papers to the appropriate Biennial Conference of the Association of Natural Resources Extension Professionals (ANREP). Additional conference presentations may also be utilized, but not substituted for the ANREP Conference without submitting a specific request to do so to the Program Contact.

Additional annual reports may be requested to provide timely information for the Secretary of Agriculture and Congress. The agency contact below will request additional reports as needed.

(b) Rural Health and Safety (RHSE):

Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions:

Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

Project Directors are required to attend a NIFA Project Directors' meeting and/or the NIFA Administrative Officers Meeting at least once during the duration of the project. Reasonable travel expenses for such annual NIFA Project Director Meeting and/or NIFA Administrative Officers Meeting should be included as part of the project budget.

Annual Performance Report:

In the case of Increase Extension Program Capacity continuation grants, annual performance reports are due 90 days prior to the anniversary date of the award and should be submitted to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

Annual performance reports must include the following information: (a) a comparison of actual accomplishments with the goals established for the reporting period (where the output of the project can be expressed readily in numbers, a computation of the cost per unit of output should be submitted, if the information is considered useful); (b) if established goals were not met, the reasons; and (c) additional pertinent information including, when appropriate, analysis and explanation of cost overruns or unexpectedly high unit costs.

Final Technical Report:

A final technical report must be submitted within 90 days after the expiration date of the project to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

The expiration date is specified in the award documents and modifications thereto, if any. Generally, the final technical report should be a summary of the completed project, including:
(a) a review of project objectives and accomplishments;
(b) a description of outcomes resulting from the project and activities undertaken to disseminate these outcomes;
(c) an explanation of partnerships and collaborative ventures that resulted from the project, including future initiatives that are planned as a result of the project;
(d) a description of the project’s impact on the PD(s), the institution(s) involved, and the community; and
(e) any pertinent data on project personnel and beneficiaries.

The final technical report also must contain any other information specified in the terms and conditions of the award.

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (RYD):

Previously funded Rural Youth Development applicants must prepare an annual report to NIFA that details all significant activities towards achieving the outputs and outcomes of the project as supported by evaluation methodologies. Provide tables, graphs and figures to facilitate comparing targeted results with actual results. Include success stories and pictures. Reports should include sections that will report:

• Outcomes for youth, adults and community stakeholders as indicated in the Rural Youth Development program Logic
• Model (See RFA)and other organization specific outcomes.
• Location of funded projects (could be shown on a map of the United States).
• Summarized outputs of participants and programs as contained in the “Output Measures Report” that was developed and used by funded organizations
• Examples (program descriptions) of community capital built in one or more areas of human, social, civic, natural, built (infrastructures), financial, and cultural. Information can be used from the Community Action report that was developed and used by the funded organizations.
• Anecdotal quotes from participants and supporting information.

Summary reports shall be by year and cumulative.

At the end of the grantee's final year, the grantee must prepare a final report to NIFA that summarizes all significant activities towards achieving the outcomes of the project, while providing final population demographics and trends in the evaluation results. Final reports should include the same bulleted information shown immediately above. Provide tables, graphs, pictures, and other figures to facilitate comparing targeted results with actual results, aggregated for the entire project. List all educational materials produced by the project. Include success stories. Reports must be received within 90 days of the termination of the award.

Projects shall submit program results to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD):

Grantees are required to submit an analysis of program strengths and opportunities in meeting national food safety priorities, and steps to be taken, if any, to strengthen program planning and execution.

Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

(f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION):

NOTE: Not Applicable. This does not represent a federal assistance program. .

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447):

NIFA expects the awarded funds to be used for the acquisition and improvement of agricultural and food sciences facilities and equipment, including libraries, so that the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, may participate fully in human capital development in the food and agricultural sciences.

1) Performance Reports:

Awardees of Federal funds are responsible for monitoring day-to-day project performance to ensure that project goals and performance schedules are met, contain costs, and accurately report progress to NIFA. An annual performance report is due in NIFA 90 days after completion of the first 12 months of the initial grant award and annually thereafter during the project period. Please report all work performed during the previous 12-month period, including any funded or unfunded time extensions. The performance report is to be submitted through NIFA's electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The report is described below and should not exceed five (5) pages in length and shall include the following information:
• A comparison of actual accomplishments against the goals and/or objectives established for the facilities program during the reporting period, including relevant percentage-of-completion data and a computation of square footage costs for all projects undertaken;
• The reason for slippage if approved goals were not met;
• Include additional pertinent information including for example, analysis and explanation of cost overruns or unexpectedly high unit costs. Report and explain any favorable or adverse conditions, changes, or situations which are expected to impact the scope, size, cost, or completion schedule for the project, along with a discussion of proposed or actual actions taken by your institution to resolve any problems encountered;
• In subsequent years, if the proposal represents any changes to your approved Five-Year Plan, please provide a description of, and justification for, the change so that our records can be updated;
• A summary of activities to be undertaken during the next 12-month period;
• A listing of architectural, engineering, and construction contracts entered into during this reporting period only for each program component in the format provided in the Competitive or Capacity Request for Applications (RFA).

Additionally, performance reports should include the following:
A. New Facilities Constructed:
1. Facility Name, Cost, Square Footage, and Funds Leveraged if any
2. Facility Uses for Teaching, Research and Extension
3. Narrative of Programs Supported and Emphasis Areas
4. Photographs

B. Facilities Renovated
1. Facility Name, cost
2. Facility Uses for Teaching, Research, and Extension
3. Narrative of Programs Supported and Emphasis Areas
4. Photographs

C. Major Land Purchases
1. Size and Cost
2. Facility Uses for Teaching, Research, and Extension
3. Photographs of Any Farm Activities

D. Major Laboratory, and Farm Equipment and Miscellaneous

E. Impact
1. Describe how the facilities program impacted the programs in food and agricultural sciences (Teaching, Research, and Extension).

3). NIFA's Web-based Inventory System Reports:

Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution. NIFA uses the SF-425, Federal Financial Report to monitor cash. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects.

The details of the reporting requirements are included in the Award Terms and Conditions. SPECIAL NOTE:
Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Further, the specific details of the reporting requirements are included in the Award Terms and Conditions.

A final “Federal Financial Report” (SF-425) is due within 90 days of the expiration date of the grant and should be submitted to the address listed below, in accordance with instructions contained in 2 CFR 3430.55 (also refer to Section 3015.82 of the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations).

Awards Management Division (AMD)
Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM)
National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
STOP 2271
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20250-2271

Telephone: (202) 401-4986

FOR CAPACITY GRANTS:
Institutions are required to submit the SF-425, Federal Financial Report per Agency instructions. The office listed below provides agency oversight of these reports:

Capacity Grants Branch
Awards Management Division (AMD)
Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM)
National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
STOP 2298
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20250-2298

Telephone: (202) 401-6520
Fax: (202) 690-3002

E-mail: formulagrantquestions@nifa.usda.gov. SPECIAL NOTE:
Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects.

Further, the details of the reporting requirements are included in the Award Terms and Conditions.
Auditing
In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, Subpart F—Audit Requirements nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more during the non-Federal entity’s fiscal year in Federal awards must have a single or program-specific audit conducted for that year in accordance with the provisions of this part. A non-Federal entity that expends less than $750,000 during the non-Federal entity’s fiscal year in Federal awards is exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in § 200.503. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO).

This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.
Records
In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, § 200.333 Retention requirements for records. Grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three (3) year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved.

2 CFR Part 200, Subpart D applies to this program.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
Statutory Formula: Title Various. Several Capacity programs are represented under CFDA 10.500. Please refer to the Capacity RFA for specific details.
Matching Requirements: SPECIAL NOTE:
Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c):

(a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [(aka 3b & c Capacity Grants (formerly known as "Formula" Funds)]:

States are eligible for funds appropriated under this Act according to the following formula: Out of each annual allocation, each State will be entitled to receive a sum of money equal to the sums available from Federal cooperative extension funds for the fiscal year 1962, and subject to the same requirements as to furnishing of equivalent sums by the State, except that amounts heretofore made available to the Secretary for allotment on the basis of special needs shall continue available for use on the same basis. Further, the University of Guam and the University of the Virgin Islands will receive $100,000 each in addition to the sums appropriated for the several States of the United States and Puerto Rico under the provisions of sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act. Of the remainder so appropriated for each fiscal year 20 per cent will be paid to the several States in equal proportions, 40 per cent will be paid to the several States in the proportion that the rural population of each bears to the total rural population of the several States as determined by the census, and the balance will be paid to the several States in the proportion that the farm population of each bears to the total farm population of the several States as determined by the census. Any appropriation made under sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act will be allotted in the first and succeeding years on the basis of the decennial census current at the time the appropriation is first made, and as to any increase, on the basis of decennial census current at the time such increase is first appropriated.

Cost Sharing or Matching

Section 3(e)(1) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. §343(e)(1)) states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for cooperative extension work.” However, section 3(e)(4) of the Smith-Lever Act (U.S.C. §343(e)(4)) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirement of paragraph (1), the insular areas of [American Samoa,] the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, [Micronesia, the Northern Marians Islands,] and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than 50 percent of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section..... The Secretary may waive the matching fund requirement [of 50 percent] for any fiscal year if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year.”

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) :

Funds will be distributed to the institutions on a quarterly basis. See Appendix A of the Capacity Request for Applications (RFA) for the specific allocation.

Cost Sharing or Matching

1862 Land-grant Institutions in the 50 States must match 100 percent of the Special Needs funds they receive with funds from non-Federal sources such as State or county appropriations. The matching must be in the form of cash. Matching funds must be used for extension activities approved in the eligible institution’s 5-Year Plan of Work.

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program :

Cost Sharing or Matching

Pursuant to rules and policies governing Section 3(b) & (c) of the Smith–Lever Act, as amended through Public Law 107-293, no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for cooperative extension work.

1. To comply with the matching requirements of the Special Needs Program, applicants are required to provide 100 percent matching funds from non-federal sources for all proposed federal funds sought in the application. In-kind and third party contributions are not allowed for the Smith-Lever Special Needs program. Grant awards cannot be issued until ALL required matching has been documented and verified.

2. Matching Alternative.— Extension Directors may certify an offset of guaranteed non-Federal funds to your application. The signed certification of offset must be scanned and included as a PDF attachment (see Part IV.,B.,2.,c.,(1) for specific instructions).

3. Matching Exception.— Insular Areas: In lieu of the matching funds requirement, the insular areas of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than 50 percent of the grants awarded. The Secretary may waive this matching fund requirement for any fiscal year if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year. Insular applicants may submit a waiver request as a PDF attachment to the application (see Part IV.,B.,2.,c.,(2) for specific instructions).

For all projects:

Matching: Applications shall include written verification of commitments of matching support from non-federal sources. Written verification means:

The sources and the amount of all matching support from outside the applicant organization should be summarized on a separate page and placed in the application as a part of the Budget

Justification attachment (see Field K on the Form SF 424 (R&R) Budget). Include the matching amount, the budget category for the match, and detail how the matching support, from each source, will be used (e.g., salary and position supported). Additionally, all pledge agreements must be included as a PDF attachment in Field K as well.

The value of applicant contributions to the project shall be established in accordance with the applicable cost principles. Applicants should refer to OMB Circulars A-21, Cost Principles for Educational Institutions; A-87, Cost Principles for State, Local, and Tribal Governments; 2 CFR Part 215, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations (OMB Circular A–110); for further guidance and other requirements relating to allowable costs.

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement):

Federal funding is distributed according to an administrative formula described in the Capacity Request for Applications (RFA). See Appendix A of the RFA for specific allocations.

NIFA CSRS retirement allocations must be used to support CSRS retirement costs for former Schedule A Appointments.

Cost Sharing or Matching

Section 3(e)(1) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. §343(e)(1) states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for cooperative extension work.” However, section 3(e)(4) of the Smith-Lever Act (U.S.C. §343(e)(4) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirements of paragraph (1), the insular areas of [American Samoa,] the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, [Micronesia, the Northern Marians Islands,] and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than 50 percent of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section. The Secretary my waive the matching fund requirement [of 50 percent] for any fiscal year if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year.”

Fiscal Year 2014 represented the last year that NIFA published a RFA for this program.

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement):

Federal funds are distributed according to an administrative formula described in the Capacity Request for Applications (RFA). See Appendix A of the RFA for specific allocations.

Cost Sharing or Matching

Section 3(e)(1) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. §343(e)(1) states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for cooperative extension work.” However, section 3(e)(4) of the Smith-Lever Act (U.S.C. §343(e)(4) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirements of paragraph (1), the insular areas of [American Samoa,] the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, [Micronesia, the Northern Marians Islands,] and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than 50 percent of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section. The Secretary my waive the matching fund requirement [of 50 percent] for any fiscal year if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year.”

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC:

There is no matching requirement for these funds.

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444):

The 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, are eligible for funds appropriated under this Act according to the following formula: Any funds annually appropriated under NARETPA section 1444 up to the amount appropriated for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1978, pursuant to section 3(d) of the Act of May 8, 1914, as amended, for eligible institutions, will be allocated among the eligible institutions in the same proportion as funds appropriated under section 3(d) of the Act of May 8, 1914, as amended, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1978, are allocated among the eligible institutions. Of the funds in excess of that amount, 20 per cent will be allotted among the eligible institutions in equal proportions; 40 per cent will be allotted among the eligible institutions in the proportion that the rural population of the State in which each eligible institution is located bears to the total rural population of all the States in which eligible institutions are located, as determined by the last preceding decennial census current at the time each such additional sum is first appropriated; and the balance will be allotted amount the eligible institutions in the proportion that the farm population of the State in which each eligible institution is located bears to the total farm population of all the States in which the eligible institutions are located, as determined by the last preceding decennial census current at the time each such additional sum is first appropriated. For purposes of computing the distribution, the allotments to Tuskegee University and Alabama A&M University will be determined as if each institution were in a separate State.

Cost Sharing or Matching

NARETPA section 1449 (7 U.S.C. 3222d) states that “the State shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources. Such matching funds shall be for an amount equal to not less than ... 100 percent of the formula [capacity grant] funds to be distributed to the eligible institution for fiscal year 2007 and each fiscal year thereafter. ... Notwithstanding [redistributing the funds], the Secretary may waive the matching funds requirement ... above the 50 percent level for any fiscal year for an eligible institution of a State if the Secretary determines that the State will be unlikely to satisfy the matching requirement.”

7 CFR 3419.1 defines “matching funds” as “funds from non-Federal sources made available by the State to the eligible institutions ... [for] programs or activities that fall within the purposes of agricultural research and cooperative extension under sections 1444 and 1445 of NARETPA ...or [for] qualifying educational activities. Matching funds means cash contributions and excludes in-kind matching contributions.” It defines “non-Federal sources” as “funds made available by the State to the eligible institution either through direct appropriation or under any authority (other than authority to charge tuition and fees paid by students) provided by a State to an eligible institution to raise revenue, such as gift acceptance authority or user fees.” Finally, it defines “qualifying educational activities” as “programs that address food and agricultural sciences components of an eligible institution.”

7 CFR 3419.6 states that “The required matching funds for the formula programs shall be used by an eligible institution for agricultural research and extension activities that have been approved in the plan of work required under sections 1444(d) and 1445(c) of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977... or for .. qualifying education activities.”

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):

(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education):

Section 7116 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) amended Section 1425 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3175) to accomplish the following:

Notwithstanding section 3(d) of the Smith-Lever Act of May 8, 1914 [7 U.S.C. 343(d)] for administration, technical, and other services for coordinating the extension work of the Department and the several States, Territories, and possessions the remainder shall be allocated among the States as follows:

1. 1862 Institutions shall receive a base in an amount equaling their FY 1981 allocation.

2. Four percent (4%) shall be available for administrative expenses.

3. $100,000 will be distributed to each 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Institution including the University of the District of Columbia.

4. For fiscal year (FY) 2009 – 10 percent of funds appropriated for EFNEP in excess of funds appropriated in FY 2007 will be allocated to the 1890 Institutions in an amount that bearing the same ratio to the population living at or below 125 percent of the poverty level (as prescribed by the Office of Management and Budget and as adjusted pursuant to section 673(2) of the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C.9902(2))) in the State where the 1890 Institution is located; bears to the total population living at or below 125 percent of the poverty level in all States where 1890 Institutions are located; as determined by the most recent decennial census at the time when the appropriated amount first exceeds levels appropriated for EFNEP in FY 2007. This FY 2009 rate of 10 percent is to increase by 1 percentage point annually until FY 2014 – maxing out at 15 percent and remaining at that level for every year thereafter.

5. The remainder will be allocated to each 1862 Land-Grant Institutions in an amount that bears the same ratio to the total amount allocated as the population living at or below 125 percent of the poverty level in the State; bears to the total population living at or below 125 percent of the poverty level in all States; as determined by the most recent decennial census at the time at which each such additional amount is first appropriated.

Cost Sharing or Matching

There is no cost-sharing or matching requirement for these funds.

(b) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(d) Farm Safety:

NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(f) Pest Management:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD):

NOTE: Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.

See CFDA Number 10.215 for pertinent details.

(h) Federally Recognized Tribes:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification:

NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(j) EIPM Support:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(k) EIPM Coordination:

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA):

The majority of the appropriated funds are distributed to eligible institutions based on a formula that considers the geographic extent, ecosystem productivity, economic contribution, and population for each state.

Since FY 2002, a small amount of these funds have been used to fund National Focus Fund Projects. (RREA-NFF).

NIFA does not require matching support for this program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

(b) Rural Health and Safety (RHSE):

The Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program provides funds to meet national goals for addressing the health and access needs of rural Americans.

NIFA does not require matching or cost sharing support for this program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities.

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (TCEP):

Appropriated funds are to be awarded to the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions for Extension work and funds are to be distributed on the basis of a competitive application process.

NIFA does not require matching support for this program, and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

Under the TCEP, the use of grant funds to plan, acquire, or construct a building or facility, or to acquire land, is not allowed. With prior approval, in accordance with the cost principles set forth in OMB Circular No. A-21, grant funds may be used to purchase equipment, or for improvements, alterations, renovations, or repairs to land, buildings, or equipment, deemed necessary to retrofit existing spaces and resources in order to carry out a funded project under this grant. However, requests to use grant funds for such purposes must demonstrate that such expenditures are incidental to the major purpose for which the grant request is made and no more than twenty-five percent of the project budget may be used to purchase equipment. Any equipment purchased with Federal funds is the property of the grantee or the subgrantee, as appropriate.

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (RYD):

Title IV of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7630) authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to make grants to the Girl Scouts of the United States of America (GSUSA), the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), the National 4-H Council (4-H Council), and the National FFA Organization (FFA). Section 7309 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act (FCEA) of 2008 reauthorized 7 U.S.C. 7630, which was also amended to provide additional flexibility in content delivery to each organization receiving funds and to allow recipients to redistribute all or part of the funds to individual councils or local chapters without further need of approval from the Secretary. In FY 2009, Terms and Conditions of these awards should facilitate the redistribution without further need of approval. The Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 (Pub. L. 111-8) appropriates funds under Division A, Title I “for grants to youth organizations pursuant to 7 U.S.C. 7630.”

There are no matching requirements associated with the Rural Youth Development program, and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of facility space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities.

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION):

Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447):

NIFA assessed four percent (4%) of the appropriated amount for Federal Administration, distributed sixty percent (60%) of the balance equally, and distributed the remaining forty percent (40%) based on the formula found in Section 1444 of NAREPTA of 1977, as amended (Pub. L. No. 95-113).

Within each institution, the research, teaching and extension programs must each receive at least 20 percent of the annual allocation. The remaining 40 percent may be allocated based on institutional needs for research, teaching, or extension. No more than 60 percent of the total allocation should be directed to research, teaching, or extension. However, if there are unique situations in your institution which warrant a deviation from these guidelines, we will consider requests for reallocation. Such reallocations must be justified by the submission of a situation statement which describes the research, teaching, and extension facilities needs in your institution and how previously available Federal funds were utilized.

NIFA does not require matching support for this program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

The obligation and expenditure of funds awarded under these grants are limited to equipment, land, buildings and other related costs which are or will be used in the administration and conduct of approved research, teaching and extension activities. In accordance with NARETPA Section 1447 (e), funds provided for this program may not be used for the payment of any overhead costs of the eligible institutions.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.
MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
SPECIAL NOTE:
Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.

1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c):

(a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [(aka 3b & c Capacity Grants (formerly known as "Formula" Funds)]:

Funds will be distributed to the institutions on a quarterly basis. See Appendix A of the Capacity Request for Applications (RFA) for the specific allocation.

Funds appropriated under sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act are expected to be fully expended in the fiscal year of appropriation; however, funds may be carried over for up to four years after the end of the year for which they were appropriated.

(b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) :

Special Needs funds are expected to be fully expended in the fiscal year of appropriation; however, funds may be carried over for up to four (4) years after the end of the year for which they were appropriated.

(c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program :

Special Needs projects have typically ranged from $30,000 to $120,000 in award size, however, the amount requested may vary depending on the urgency of the need(s) needs being addressed by the proposed project. Special Needs Program encourages applications that specifically address one or more of the following six (6) key target areas:

1. Education and Technical assistance applications may be for project periods of up to five (5) years;

2. Collaboration applications may be for project periods of up to five (5) years;

3. Long range family, community and regional planning applications may be for project periods of up to five (5) years;

4. Communication delivery applications may be for project periods of up to five (5) years;

5. Dissemination of credible, science-based information applications may be for project periods of up to five (5) years; and

6. Integrated Research and Extension Planning Projects applications may be for project periods of up to one (1) year with proposed budgets not to exceed $15,000 per proposal.

(d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement):

CSRS Retirement Contributions Program funds are expected to be fully expended in the fiscal year of appropriation: however, funds allocated may be carried over for up to four (4) years from the year end for which they were appropriated.

(e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement):

FERS Retirement Contributions Program funds are expected to be fully expended in the fiscal year of appropriation: however, funds allocated may be carried over for up to four (4) years from the year end for which they were appropriated.

(f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC and/or DCPPERA:

DCPPERA funds are expected to be fully expended in the fiscal year of appropriation; however funds may be carried over for up to four (4) years after the end of the year for which they were appropriated.

2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444):

Section 1444 Program funds are expected to be fully expended in the fiscal year of appropriation; however, no more than 20 per cent of the funds received by an institution in any fiscal year may be carried forward to the succeeding fiscal year. No prior approval from NIFA is required. Since these limitations are legislatively mandated, NIFA is not authorized to approve any carryover requests beyond the 20 percent and one-year limitations.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.


3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d):

(a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education):

EFNEP funds are expected to be fully expended in the fiscal year of appropriation; however funds may be carried over for up to four (4) years after the end of the year for which they were appropriated.

(b) Children, Youth and Families at Risk (CYFAR):

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life:

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(d) Farm Safety:

NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(e) New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE):

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(f) Pest Management:

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD):

NOTE: Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.

See CFDA Number 10.215 for pertinent details.

(h) Federally Recognized Tribes:
Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification:
NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined:
•Farm Safety;
•Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and
•Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project.

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(j) EIPM Support:

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(k) EIPM Coordination:

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

(a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA):

The project period ranges from 18-24 months, and may be extended by NIFA without additional financial support for such additional period(s) as the ADO determines may be necessary to complete or fulfill the purposes of an approved project. In no case shall the total project period exceed five years. Any extension of time shall be conditioned upon prior request by the awardee and approval in writing by the ADO, unless prescribed otherwise in the terms and conditions of award.

(b) Rural Health and Safety (RHSE):

The project period shall not exceed one (1) year. Project period may be extended by NIFA without additional financial support for such additional period(s) as the ADO determines may be necessary to complete or fulfill the purposes of an approved project. In no case shall the total project period exceed five years. Any extension of time shall be conditioned upon prior request by the awardee and approval in writing by the ADO, unless prescribed otherwise in the terms and conditions of award.

(c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions :

Continuation grants to “Increase Extension Program Capacity” may be funded for up to four years for competitively-selected proposals, one from each eligible institutions. Applicants may request up to $85,000 for each year of funding requested. Funding is awarded on an annual basis (within that specified time period) and subject to the availability of annual appropriations and satisfactory progress of the project.

All 1994 Institutions are invited to submit applications under the “Extension Special Emphasis Project” type. There is no limit to the number of applications a 1994 Institution, or a consortium of 1994 Institutions, may submit under the Extension Special Emphasis Project type. Each application submitted by a single institution or multiple institutions may request up to $100,000. The project period may not exceed three (3) years. These will not be awarded as continuation grants.

(d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (RYD):

A proposal may request a grant for a duration of 18 months. The project period may be extended by NIFA without additional financial support, for such additional period(s) as the ADO determines may be necessary to complete or fulfill the purposes of an approved project, but in no case shall the total project period exceed five years. Any extension of time shall be conditioned upon prior request by the awardee and approval in writing by the ADO, unless prescribed otherwise in the terms and conditions of award.

(e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD):

The term of the contract, grant or cooperative agreement shall be three (3) years, with options to extend the term triennially.

(f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION):

Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

(g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447):

This RFA is for renewal applications only. Eligible applicants must submit a renewal application. This is a project application that requests additional funding to continue the project that was approved in an original or amended award. Applicants should request funding for an additional year at the amount for their eligible organization.

Section 1447 of NARETPA of 1977 [7 U.S.C. 3222b] designates distribution of these funds. The program was reauthorized through FY 2012 by Section 7123 of FCEA (Pub. L. 110-246).

Future funding will be strictly subject to new appropriations.

Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: by letter of credit.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
None. Represents additional updates for Section # 153 Websites:

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/smith-lever-special-needs-competitve-grants-program

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-institution-teaching-research-and-extension-capacity-building-grants-cbg

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-and-expanded-food-and-nutrition

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-%13-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae

http://nifa.usda.gov/program/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-grant-program

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants.
Headquarters Office
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Production and Sustainablity, Division of Plant Systems-Protection, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2240, Telephone: (202) 401-4939; Fax: (202) 401-1782.

ADDITIONAL CONTACTS:
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Production and Sustainablity, Division of Agricultural Systems, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2240, Telephone: (202) 401-0151; Fax: (202) 401-5179;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Office of the Director, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2201, Telephone: (202) 401-1112; Fax: (202) 690-1290;

USDA, NIFA. National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Telephone: (202) 720-9278; Fax: (202) 720-9366;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition, Division of Nutrition, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2225, Telephone: (202) 401-2138; Fax: (202) 401-6488;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Bioenergy, Climate, and Environment, Division of Global Climate Change, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2210, Telephone: (202) 401-4926; Fax: (202) 401-1705;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Youth and 4-H, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Telephone: (202) 690-4568; Fax: (202) 720-9366;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Community and Education, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Telephone: (202) 720-2324; Fax: (202) 720-2030;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Bioenergy, Climate and Environment – Division of Environmental Systems, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2210, Telephone: (202) 720-5229; Fax: (202) 720-3945;

AND

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Family and Consumer Sciences, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Telephone: (202) 720-4795; Fax: (202) 720-9366., Washington , District of Columbia 20250-2240 Email: Policy@nifa.usda.gov Phone: (202) 401-4939 Fax: (202) 401-1782
Website Address
http://nifa.usda.gov/grants
Financial Information
Account Identification
12-0502-0-1-352.
Obligations
(Project Grants) FY 14 $460,751,645; FY 15 est $460,752,595; and FY 16 est $457,666,680 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive and/or capacity project grant or cooperative agreement are established, these will be announced in the annual program announcement, and/or Competitive or Capacity Request for Application (RFA).
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
The following federal statutes and regulations represent general administrative requirements which apply to NIFA federal assistance programs. These include, but are not limited to the ones listed below.

2 CFR Part 25 - Universal Identifier and Central Contractor Registration

2 CFR Part 170 - Reporting Subaward and Executive Compensation Information

2 CFR Part 175 - Award Term for Trafficking in Persons

2 CFR Part 180 and Part 417 - OMB Guidelines to Agencies on Government-Wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) and USDA Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension

2 CFR Part 182 - Governmentwide Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Financial Assistance)

2 CFR Part 200 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards

2 CFR Part 400 – USDA implementation of 2 CFR Part 200 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards

2 CFR Part 415 - General Program Administrative Regulations

2 CFR Part 416 – USDA General Program Administrative Regulations for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments

2 CFR Part 417 - Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension

2 CFR Part 418 - New Restrictions on Lobbying

2 CFR Part 421 - Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Financial Assistance)

2 CFR Part 422—Research Institutions Conducting USDA-Funded Extramural Research; Research Misconduct.

7 CFR Part 1, subpart A—USDA implementation of the Freedom of Information Act and 7 CFR Part 3404, Public Information.

7 CFR Part 1c—USDA Implementation of the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects

7 CFR Part 3—USDA implementation of OMB Circular No. A-129 regarding debt collection

7 CFR Part 15, subpart A—USDA implementation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended

7 CFR Part 331 and 9 CFR Part 121—USDA implementation of the Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002

7 CFR Part 3407—USDA procedures to implement the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended

7 CFR Part 3418—Stakeholder Input Requirements for Recipients of Agricultural Research, Education, and Extension Formula Funds

7 CFR Part 3419—Matching Funds Requirement for Agricultural Research and Extension Formula Funds at 1890 Land–Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, and at 1862 Land–Grant Institutions in Insular Areas

7 CFR Part 3430—Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Financial Assistance Programs--General Award Administrative Provisions

7 CFR Part 3434—Hispanic–Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities Certification Process

29 U.S.C. 794 (section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973) and 7 CFR Part 15b (USDA implementation of statute) —prohibiting discrimination based upon physical or mental handicap in federally-assisted programs

35 U.S.C. 200 et seq. —Bayh Dole Act, controlling allocation of rights to inventions made by employees of small business firms and domestic nonprofit organizations, including universities, in federally-assisted programs (implementing regulations are contained in 37 CFR Part 401)

44 U.S.C. 3551-3558 (Pub. L. 113–283) - Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014 (FISMA). Applies to awardees if it will collect, store, process, transmit, or use information on behalf of NIFA.

Executive Order 13513, Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging while Driving (Oct. 1, 2009).

NIFA Federal Assistance Policy Guide—a compendium of basic NIFA policies and procedures that apply to all NIFA awards, unless there are statutory, regulatory, or award-specific requirements to the contrary.

In addition, the following represent Program-Specific requirements:

7 CFR Part 3400 – Special Research Grants Program (for CFDA 10.200)

7 CFR Part 3401—Rangeland Research Grants Program (CFDA 10.200)

7 CFR Part 3402—Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate and Postgraduate Fellowship Grants Program (CFDA 10.210).

7 CFR Part 3403—Small Business Innovation Research Grants Program (CFDA 10.212)

7 CFR Part 3405—Higher Education Challenge Grants Program (CFDA 10.217)

7 CFR Part 3406—1890 Institution Capacity Building Grants Program (CFDA 10.216)

7 CFR Part 3415 – Biotechnology Risk Assessment Research Grants Program (CFDA 10.219)

7 CFR Part 3431—Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (CFDA 10.313)


Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2014: For Fiscal Year 2014:

(A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [aka Smith-Lever 3 (b) & (c) Capacity (formerly known as “Formula”)] Grants Programs:

Below are examples of progress from FY 2014 annual reports:

1. Food Safety Concerns for the Consumer:
Demand for artisanal cheeses, including raw milk cheeses, is increasing in the United States. This research addressed food safety concerns for the consumer. Project took three transdisciplinary approaches to understand and manage artisanal cheese food safety, including on-farm and consumer research addressing raw fluid milk marketed direct to consumers and raw milk products produced on farms. Results of the first approach identified pathogen epidemiology and testing, food safety concerns and practical risk management practices at the site of dairy product production. The second approach sought to understand consumer attitudes, beliefs, and practices related to raw milk products. The third approach integrated the findings from the research efforts to develop outreach materials targeting artisanal cheese producers and stakeholders.

2. Sustainable Energy
Evaluation studies were conducted at the annual oilseed producer meeting and online as well. This survey was conducted on oil seed producers to identify if information generated and delivered by the oil seed program has improved yield and quality of the crop. Results of the studies were as follows:
33% indicated that extension work helped to improve their oilseed yields;
75% indicated that their work helped to improve weed control insects and diseases; 100% indicated that extension work helped them to reduce harvest losses through fine-tuned harvest and drying practices.

3. Climate Change
Over 360 participants were polled regarding use and value of extension information. Results showed that 86% use the information in the weed control guide for effective weed management, 66% use the information disseminated through the List Serve, and 96% have improved their weed management practices by using information provided by extension specialists. 31% claim extension service as their primary source of pest management information. 75% indicated that they will use extension’s recommendation to use soil applied herbicides in addition to post-applied glyphosate. 51% of workshop participants are willing to use the most disdained extension recommendation –to use hand weeding to remove individual plants or small patches of herbicide-resistant weeds to prevent increase in infestation across an entire field.

4. People and Their Well Being
Food Smart Families: Helping Youth Make Healthier Choices. More than 1000 hours were devoted to teaching healthy living programs to over 14,000 youth across the state. This program reached 2,945 youth. As part of this undertaking, 14 youth ambassadors were trained to assist with presentations.
Sessions were conducted at 11 sites. Because of program participation,
96% youth learned what foods they should eat every day;
94% learned how to make healthy food choices;
90% thought their families prepared healthier meals;
86% learned cooking skills; and
80% learned skills for buying food on a budget.

5. Economics, Markets and Policy
Evaluation from a survey conducted with 10 participants working with an agricultural program resulted as follows:
67% indicated they will increase their record keeping;
50% will change how they keep electronic records;
83% indicated they have now analyzed production practices and size, financial position and natural resources and conservation;
80% indicated they were now more confident in making decisions;
40% have now written short-term and mid-term goals; and
20% now have long term written goals.

6. Childhood Obesity
Rural communities provide an excellent context to examine the fruits and vegetables consumption patterns of Youth at Risk while also engaging youth in production work within their own communities. By engaging low-income youth in the construction and maintenance of gardens and in harvesting and marketing organically grown produce, studies found that youth not only consume more produce, but they also become more visible and engaged in their communities. One project found that the increased visibility of youth participating at local farmers markets can lead to other economic opportunities for youth.

(B) Cooperative Extension at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) – aka Smith-Lever Special Needs] Grants Program:

Below are five examples of progress from 2014 annual reports:

1.Food Safety Concerns for the Consumer
Demand for artisanal cheeses, including raw milk cheeses, is increasing in the United States. This research addressed food safety concerns for the consumer. The project took three transdisciplinary approaches to understand and manage artisanal cheese food safety, including on-farm and consumer research addressing raw fluid milk marketed direct to consumers and raw milk products produced on farms. Results of the first approach identified pathogen epidemiology and testing, food safety concerns and practical risk management practices at the site of dairy product production. The second approach sought to understand consumer attitudes, beliefs, and practices related to raw milk products. The third approach integrated the findings from the research efforts to develop outreach materials targeting artisanal cheese producers and stakeholders.

2. Sustainable Energy
Evaluation studies were conducted at the annual oilseed producer meeting and online as well. This survey was conducted on oil seed producers to identify if information generated and delivered by oil seed program has improved yield and quality of the crop. Results of the studies were as follows:
33% indicated that extension work helped to improve their oilseed yields, 75% indicated that their work helped to improve weed control insects and diseases, and 100% indicated that extension work helped them to reduce harvest losses through fine-tuned harvest and drying practices.

3. Climate Change
Over 360 participants were polled regarding use and value of extension information. Results showed that 86% use the information in weed control guide for effective weed management, 66% use the information disseminated through the List Serve, and 96% have improved their weed management practices by using information provided by extension specialists. 31% claim the extension service as their primary source of pest management information. 75% indicated that they will use extension’s recommendation to use soil applied herbicides in addition to post-applied glyphosate. 51% of workshop participants are willing to use the most disdained extension recommendation –to use hand weeding to remove individual plants or small patches of herbicide resistant weeds to prevent increase in infestation across an entire field.

4. People and Their Well Being
Food Smart Families: Helping Youth Make Healthier Choices. More than 1000 hours were devoted to teaching healthy living programs to over 14,000 youth across the state. This program reached 2,945 youth. As part of this undertaking, 14 youth ambassadors were trained to assist with presentations.
Sessions were conducted at 11 sites. Because of program participation,
96% youth learned what foods they should eat every day;
94% learned how to make healthy food choices;
90% thought their families prepared healthier meals;
86% learned cooking skills; and
80% learned skills for buying food on a budget.

5. Economics, Markets and Policy
Evaluation from a survey conducted with 10 participants working with an agricultural program resulted as follows:
67% indicated they will increase their record keeping;
50% will change how they keep electronic records;
83% indicated they have now analyzed production practices and size, financial position and natural resources and conservation;
80% indicated they were now more confident in making decisions;
40% have now written short-term and mid-term goals; and
20% now have long term written goals.

6. Childhood Obesity
Rural communities provide an excellent context to examine the fruits and vegetables consumption patterns of Youth at Risk while also engaging youth in production work within their own communities. By engaging low-income youth in the construction and maintenance of gardens and in harvesting and marketing organically grown produce, studies found that youth not only consume more produce, but they also become more visible and engaged in their communities. One project found that the increased visibility of youth participating at local farmers markets can lead to other economic opportunities for youth.

(C) Smith-Lever Special Needs [Sections 3 (b) & (c)] Competitive Grants Program:

For FY 2014:
This program continued to meet critical needs to address: 1) Education and Technical assistance and multi-state disaster training programs; 2) Collaboration with Federal, state and local agencies and other disaster relief organizations to support education and service that enhance recovery of impacted rural communities, schools, businesses and agricultural based activities; 3) Long range family, community and regional planning projects that enhance implementation of programs that serve public needs in preparation for, during and after emergency situations within impacted states and regions. The project funding was determined by availability of an allocation to support innovative, education-based approaches to addressing emergency preparedness and specific responses related to natural and human-made disasters.


(D) Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions and (newly designated) Central State University (aka 1890 Capacity Building and/or CBG) Grants Program:

For FY 2014:
One administrative project was awarded to each of the 18 1890 institutions. The following describes some of the work that was accomplished:

1. This extension initiative is expanding educational outreach in the STEM/STEAM areas for youth and college students that will increase the enrollment of limited resource families and communities who are at or below poverty and who qualify for support services. Programmatic content will be distributed through workshops. Extension staff conducted field days, demonstrations, agricultural leadership sessions, etc., to offer information to producers and potential producers. Information provided to citizens will enhance their knowledge of food, nutrition, quality, availability, pesticide laws and applications, risk management, and agriculture advocacy.

2. The Adult Leadership and Community Development Program provides communities with leadership training, financial management, business development, family and consumer education capacity that creates opportunities for continuous and sustained growth. With a focus on resource building, education and training, leadership, strategic and sustainability planning, the 1890 Extension Program assists socially disadvantaged and economically depressed communities in building their potential to enhance their own resource development capacity from the inside out.

(E) Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) aka Smith-Lever 3d EFNEP and/or ENUT] Grants Program:

For FY 2014:
The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is funded as a national program, not as individual projects. All 75 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Institutions receive EFNEP funding each year, and these are the only entities eligible for EFNEP funding. EFNEP is designed to assist limited resource audiences in acquiring the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and changed- behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets, and to contribute to their personal development and the improvement of the total family diet and nutritional well-being. Although EFNEP lessons may be tailored to meet the needs of participants, all programming follows the same model: lessons are taught by peer educators using an evidence-based, interactive, culturally appropriate approach. Participant entry and exit data are collected on diet quality, physical activity, food safety, and food resource management practices, all of which influence health.

(F) Regional Integrated Pest Management Competitive Grants Programs:

(F-1) North Central Region (aka NC-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(F-2) Northeastern Region (aka NE-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(F-3) Southern Region (aka S-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(F-4) Western Region (aka W-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

FARM SAFETY – COMBINED PROGRAMS (G), (H) & (W):

(G) Farm Safety;
(H) Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program (aka YFSEC); and
(W) Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities - National AgrAbility Project:

For FY 2014:
The AgrAbility program increases the likelihood that individuals with disabilities and their families engaged in production agriculture (AgrAbility’s customers) become more successful. The program provides up to four years of funding to support cooperative projects in which State Cooperative Extension Services (CES) based at either 1862 or 1890 land-grant universities or the University of the District of Columbia subcontract to private, non-profit disability organizations. Measures of success may include improvements in customers’ financial stability or access to life activities and in the capacity of the states and regions to deliver services this population requires in a timely and satisfying manner.

To address the specialized needs of AgrAbility’s customers, the program builds service capacity on national, regional, state, and local levels through education and networking. In the absence of capacity, projects provide assistance to customers. The primary function of the National AgrAbility Project is to support the state and regional projects in developing their capacity to meet these objectives. AgrAbility Projects use marketing activities to direct the public to initiatives in these three priority areas, described below:

In FY 2014, Farm Safety funding line supported 14 new awards and continued support for eight previously-funded projects.
Continuation Awards:
• 7 AgrAbility continuation awards;
• 1 Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification award.

FY14 Continuation Awards:
• 3 continuation awards to support 4th (final) year of State AgrAbility projects originally funded in FY2011;
• 1 continuation award for the 3rd year of funding for the National AgrAbility Project (originally funded in FY2012);
• 4 continuation awards for the 2nd year of funding (includes YFSEC award).

(I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE):

In FY 2014 for example, NTAE funds assisted in the launch of the Climate Learning Network in support of the USDA Regional Climate HUBS. This Learning Network is implemented through the CES eXtension initiative and provides outreach and education to farmers, ranchers, forest landowners, and natural and agriculture resource managers on science-based risk management

CHILDREN, YOUTH, AND FAMILIES (CYFAR) COMBINED PROGRAMS (J), (U) & (V) :

(J) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (aka Youth at Risk and/or CYFAR);
(U) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP); and
(V) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP);

For FY 2014:
The Alabama A & M CYFAR Project is in its fifth year of operation at two sites in Madison County. The program is implemented using the CYFAR National Outcome Parent/Family. The program impacts both youth and parents' reading skills. The program is designed to impact the cognitive, emotional and social development skills of youth ages 4-9 given that 82% of Alabama’s low income youth in grade four performed below national reading standards. The program is designed for parents to develop appropriate reading strategies to assess their child’s progress using the Journey’s core curriculum and to increase parents' knowledge and skills of reading strategies to assist in improving their children's reading ability.

Thirteen parents are:
learning the five essential elements of reading;
learning at least 10 different reading strategies/activities for each element; and demonstrating the use of at least seven different reading techniques.

Thirteen children are: being exposed to at least seven different reading strategies/activities for each essential element of reading.

During the second year of the Michigan State University CYFAR funding, several goals of the project were accomplished, including developing the online class and resources; providing a new venue allowing MI families across the state to access research-based early childhood development and parenting information through the website; providing access to a comprehensive, research-based website focused on educational resources for parenting the young child that included opportunities for structured interaction with peers through online chat forums and weekly live touch-base meetings via technology. Eight videos were created based on helping parents understand social-emotional development of young children and were posted on the Michigan State University (MSU) YouTube channel.

Through the use of the online class, MSU was able to increase capacity to reach high-risk families in both urban and rural areas without having access to local staff thereby expanding program reach. The two face-to-face sites were able to reach high-risk families in both rural and urban communities with resources and research-based information to help change and inform their parenting practices. Preliminary evaluation results of the first wave of participants suggests positive changes, pre to post participation in the
BEES parenting session, in the quality of parenting, including emotionally supportive parenting, knowledge about early social-emotional development and parenting, and parental functioning.

Effect sizes were generally small with the exception of decreases in parenting stress, which yielded a large effect size. More participants are needed to show statistically significant changes but preliminary results are positive and showing that workshops are helping to build skills and strategies for dealing with issues and challenges high risk families face in raising their children as well as educating parents of young children on developmental stages and needs of young children.

The North Carolina 4-H Very Important Parents Sustainable Community Project has a concentrated program that addresses the well-being of children, youth and families by integrating 4-H life skills. The program design develops teens’ parenting and life skills; cultivate their child's developmental and educational success; and, incorporates technology to foster young parents' identification and use of credible parenting information. The project reports increases in character, increases in nurturing attitudes and appropriate parenting practices.

The project, in its fifth year, is set to accomplish the prescribed program goals. Some 76 teen parents began the 4-H Very Important Parents face-to-face classes increasing their knowledge of quality parenting practices. Teen parents who attended the 4-H Very Important Parents program increased their perception of parenting as evidenced by increased post-survey scores on the CYFAR common measure for parenting.

Teen parents increased their technology literacy including use of mobile technology devices, blogger, Facebook, and online evaluation tools. Community partnerships are being developed and enhanced to foster program sustainability. Focus groups were conducted with childcare providers to provide the foundation for a childcare provider training on using technology to engage parents.

The University of Arizona Teens Advocating Sustainable Change (TASC) Project functions at two sites: Pima and Cochise Counties. The project has been successful by means of collaborations with the school system, extension and multiple community organizations. The project offers training for participants in health and wellness, which takes place at the Tucson Village farm.

The Primary CYFAR Outcome is teens demonstrating knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors necessary to fulfill contributing lives. The project has been successful with reaching diverse audiences. The project has realized sustainability by collaborating with specified County Health departments. The Project Director has completed the appropriate reports and is on target for accomplishing the project goals. This project is approved for continuation.

The TASC had a successful year during which this project grew from four high schools to five and from 105 to 150 youth participants. Evaluation results from year one were used to identify program improvements in year two. Pre/post evaluations showed increased willingness to eat healthy food as reflected in the NYRB Dietary Intake section. Youth also reported increases in actual frequency of consuming healthier foods. At the beginning of the program using pre-surveys, youth reported eating healthier foods 3-6 times over the past seven days. At the end of the project year they reported eating healthier foods twice per day over the past seven days. Progress has been made in integrating student wellness into the school environment. Student wellness events have been instituted at participating high schools and students are disseminating information through blogs and other social media.

The TASC program has used Cooperative Extension facilities to provide training for youth participants including Tucson Village Farm, The Garden Kitchen, and the 4-H High Ropes Course. In addition, the local YMCA was used to provide leadership training to youth participants. Students participated in a Healthy Living Youth Summit.

The University of Connecticut CYFAR Project is entitled “Tools for Healthy Living.” The project is in its third year and reaches 60 youth annually. One of the purposes is to develop a healthy home environment curriculum for youth grades six through eight. The goal of the curriculum is designed to address the lack of curriculum that exists for this age group to reduce health hazards in the home. Part of the sustainability plan is engagement of youth participants living at the 50% level in the 4-H clubs.

The club sites are in New Britain and Hartford, Connecticut. The Healthy Homes App was also completed by our technology specialist and is undergoing licensing. It is being piloted by youth at several sites in the project. A webpage has also been developed and is undergoing approval through the University. This evaluation relates to knowledge and/or skills gained on healthy homes content. In 2014, evaluation data indicated that youth gained awareness, knowledge and skills in a number of healthy homes content areas including food safety, mold, asthma, lead, and pests. In 2015, it is anticipated that youth will show similar results. Common measures data (technology and youth demographics) has also been collected on enrolled youth at each site. Six urban 4-H clubs have been sustained at sites after this year's project.

For the FY 2014 award cycle, $995,525 was available for CYFAR-PDTA project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs. One university was awarded a PDTA continuation award.

The funded project is designed to address the professional development and technical assistance needs of the CYFAR-SCP grantees.

The CYFAR PDTA Center was developed and serves as a mechanism to support the success of the CYFAR initiative through the development and provision of: Project Coaching, Proactive evaluation & technical assistance, Resources and Tools. Strategic Leadership Team, Advisory Committee, and Subject Matter Experts serve as representatives across the land-grant system representative of 1862, 1890, 1994, and Hispanic-serving Institutions. The PDTA Center supports CYFERnet.org and CYFERnetSEARCH.org

(K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education-Professional Development (aka Chapter 3 and/or SARE-PD):

For FY 2014:
Project types formerly funded under this line will now be supported and reported under CFDA 10.215

NOTES:
(1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.

(2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details.

(L) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP):

For FY 2014:
In 2014, the Muscogee (Creek) Nation youth participated in 4-H with two Muscogee youth serving as Northeast District Officers and many more serving as county officers. In Muskogee County, the educator reached over 400 children with his robotics, straw rockets, and liquid nitrogen workshops. Livestock management and an archery camp complete this effort, which serves 4,400 youth. The program assistants introduced Muscogee youth to a new curriculum called “Take a Stand,” an anti-bullying curriculum. School systems within the Muscogee Nation boundaries have been excited about the opportunity to provide this type of information to their students. Other programs will continue as described.

All three South Dakota FRTEP programs are working collectively to address the lack of access to nutritious food on their reservations where many rely on convenience stores which have very little fresh food. All three South Dakota FRTEP projects are partners on a 2014 Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program to stimulate local food production in each FRTEP service area. The Pine Ridge and Cheyenne River projects worked with United Tribes Technical College on an agriculture and food program for Lakota Nations Education conference. Rosebud and Pine Ridge also provided Risk Management Education programs and agro-enterprise meetings between tribal partners SDSU and State of South Dakota.

EXTENSION AT 1994 INSTITUTIONS COMBINED PROGRAMS (M) & (BB) :

(M) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and/or TCEP); and
(BB) Tribal Colleges Extension-Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE):

For FY 2014:
Projects representing continuation awards and examples of funded projects:

The Oglala Lakota Extension office collaborated with South Dakota State University and the Oglala Sioux Tribe provided producer workshops and events aimed at enhancing farm productivity. Student and faculty from the college’s math and science department provided technical assistance to producers in hydrology, GIS positioning and land management. The college offered nutrition and garden outreach to the community as well. The college built an Ag Expo Center where it can conduct workshops and events on Lakota agriculture, career development and family life. Part of this grant was used to plan and promote the new center.


White Earth Tribal and Community College used a NIFA special emphasis award for a project that combines gardening and traditional Anishinaabeg foods, with the addition of video and social media to promote traditional agriculture and provide instruction to a wider audience. The project director also led an effort to create a food asset map for the White Earth community. The food map laid a foundation for enhanced local production so that more families have access to fresh produce. Local experts on gardening and traditional foods mentored families as they explore gardening as a means to better health.

This project seeks to reduce inter-generational poverty by encouraging children of the Lummi Nation to seek higher education while teaching them financial management skills. Educators plan to reach 600 youth in grades 7 through 12. The curriculum was developed in partnership with the Lummi Nation School, Lummi Nation Youth Enrichment, and local Social Services programs. The financial literacy training built math skills while training youth on how to set and reach financial and educational goals. A train-the-trainer effort expanded the program’s reach.

RENEWABLE RESOURCES EXTENSION ACT COMBINED PROGRAMS (N) & (O) :

(N) Renewable Resources Extension Act (aka RREA); and
(O) Renewable Resources Extension Act-National Focus Fund Projects (aka RREA-NFF):

For FY 2014:
Examples of the impacts that RREA capacity funds provide (69 of 72 institutions reporting to date):
• Number of forest and rangeland Extension educational events – 2,360+
• Number of landowners adopting at least one new management practice – 13,695 925+
• Number of forest and rangeland acres impacted – 5,595,459 +
• Number of forest management plans developed – 2 358

For the FY 2014 funding cycle, $300,000 was available for competitive National Focus Funds projects. Two awards were made:
• eXtension Community of Practice – Climate, Forests, and Woodlands;
• Discovering Our Nation’s Rangelands

(P) Rural Health and Safety Education (Competitive) Grants Program (aka RHSE):

RHSE projects funded in FY 2014 are focusing on a diversity of rural health and safety issues, from diabetes education, obesity prevention, and physical activity and healthy nutrition education, to zoonoses prevention, eco-healthy child care promotion, and rural expansion of 4-H Healthy Living program.

(Q) 1890 Facilities Grant Program and Tuskegee and (newly designated) Central State University (aka Section 1447):

For FY 2014:
The second year of funding under the Five-Year Plan of Work (2013-2017) was requested through a renewal RFA. Examples of funded projects are as follows:

Funds are being used to continue construction activities associated with the newly proposed Research and Education Center that will house teaching, research, and extension. The new facility will feature an auditorium, two classrooms, two conference rooms, ten offices, space for administrative support staff, and general and specialized laboratories. Recent progress includes the appointment of a facility committee to plan and evaluate the specific needs of the relevant departments and to demonstrate how the new facility will best meet the needs of the land-grant components of the university. Also, funding is being used to purchase additional farm land and buildings.

This project will support the construction of a Regional Technical Resource Center that will serve as the primary building for administrative functions of the land-grant mission. It will house units that coordinate field research activities by faculty and students, work with regional farmers, student scholarship and internship placement, and coordination with external agencies.

The FY 2014 timeline indicates that the university will acquire the necessary land and hire an architectural firm that will prepare plans for the engineering phase, building design, and pre-construction administration.

In FY 2014 the facilities grant was used to complete the construction and equipping of the Environmental Ecology and Natural Resources Center and to complete an existing research facility to a food processing lab and product development center. A Research and Extension Center was also completed in FY 2014.

Funds are being used to support the expansion of office, lab, and greenhouse space to accommodate the plant pathology program and the pest management research program:
1) The plant pathology program includes developing statewide research and extension programs that are geared towards formulating fact-based diagnosis and identification of vegetable and small fruit disease;
2) the development of pest management methods to effectively suppress major insects requires a multitude of field, greenhouse, and laboratory investigations of pest biology and hosts/pest/climate interactions to identify vulnerable cropping systems and vulnerable states in the pest life cycle.

(R) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD):

For FY 2014:
Funded Project Network Node 1: Coordinate national program, develop pharmacokinetic modeling approaches and provide pharmacokinetic support to FARAD components, and on a rotating schedule with other network nodes, provide responses to emergency queries (telephone, internet) from the FARAD Hotline.

Funded Project Network Node 2: maintains the pharmacokinetic, bibliographic and call center databases and web-based access to the kinetic and bibliographic citation files. On a rotating basis with other network nodes, this node also provides responses to drug and contaminant residue questions submitted to FARAD.

Funded Project Network Node 3: Collects and enters data for the U.S. Approved Animal Drugs Database (US-AADD), maintains internet websites for FARAD, creates and supports platforms for mobile devices to access the Veterinarian's Guide to Residue Avoidance Management (VetGRAM) and other mobile-friendly applications, and distributes electronic alerts and updates via email, Twitter, and other electronic formats.

Funded Project Network Node 4: On a rotating schedule with other network nodes, provides responses to emergency telephone calls from the FARAD hotline. Collaboration between all institutions occurs on research.

(S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development and/or RYD Grants Program):

For FY 2014:
620 youth in 53 targeted rural communities participated in state and local leadership teams, working with 253 adults to develop youth-adult partnerships. These teams engaged an additional 3,020 youth and 546 adults to implement action plans to solve priority community issues.

Through community youth adult partnerships, youth learned and applied work and life skills such as: organizing groups and information, leading discussions, planning programs, teamwork, communication, creativity and innovation, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, goal setting, collaboration, and working with diverse populations.

A Native American community started a project to begin local vegetable production. Tribal members wanted to increase local food production as a way to support healthy eating, creating a local “farmer’s market” and generating more interest in traditional foods of the tribe. Tribal members constructed a Hoop House and planted cover crops for full production. This partnership has developed a reconnection between youth and tribal elders and a rekindled pride in the reservation community.

A group of high school seniors planned an education activity for their peers about risky behaviors. Student participants experienced the effects of life altering situations, like driving drunk, being arrested, becoming a teenage parent, or contracting a sexually-transmitted disease. Post-event surveys showed that 91 % of respondents agreed that they would change their behavior as a result of this experience. Furthermore, 87 % of respondents agreed that their friends will change their behavior as a result of this experience.

A group of youth and adults in partnership conducted community forums that encouraged both the youth and adults in these communities to improve critical community capitals through the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and positive attitudes.

(T) Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka ARPA, ERME and/or RME Program):

For FY 2014:
The Total Number of ERME Projects funded in the 2014 fall were:
1. Northeast Center - 28 applications plus 2 Exploratory were received. (10 Full Education applications and 2 Exploratory applications were funded);
2. North Central Center - 41 applications plus 6 Exploratory Projects were received (15 projects were Funded, plus 4 Exploratory);
3. South Center - 45 applications were received; no Exploratory were received (15 applications were Funded); and,
4. West Center - 46 applications and 3 Exploratory Projects were received (15 applications were Funded, plus 3 Exploratory)

(U) – CYFAR-SCP and (V) – CYFAR-PDTA are part of the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS.

NOTE: See (J) - CYFAR above for pertinent details regarding the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS (J), (U) & (V).

(W) – AgrAbility is part of the COMBINED FARM SAFETY PROGRAMS.
N OTE: See (G) – Farm Safety and (H) – YFSEC above for pertinent details.

(X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (aka IPM-CS):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act:

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(Z) Military Family Readiness System (aka MFRS):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(AA) Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY):

This program was not funded in FY 2014.


(BB) Tribal Colleges Extension Program- Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) – Programs Combined - See CFDA 10.500 (M) above.

(CC) District of Columbia Public Secondary Education Reorganization Act Program (CES-Formula):

For FY 2014:
The College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSES) embodies the land-grant tradition, offering cutting edge academic programs in environmental science, urban sustainability, water resources management, nutrition and dietetics, urban architecture and community planning. Funds are being used to carry out educational programs and research in Climate Change; Global Food Security and Hunger; Health, Nutrition and Childhood Obesity Prevention; Urban Families, Youth and Communities; and Sustainable Energy through the University of the District of Columbia (UDC’s) two essential land-grant components, the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service, including five land-grant centers:
(1) Center for Urban Agriculture & Gardening Education,
(2) Center for Sustainable Development,
(3) Center for Nutrition, Diet & Health,
(4) Center for 4H & Youth Development, and
(5) Architectural Research Institute. Fiscal Year 2015: For Fiscal Year 2015:

(A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [aka Smith-Lever 3 (b) & (c) Capacity (formerly known as “Formula”)] Grants Programs:

As outlined in the 2015 Plans of Work, the following are five examples of anticipated outcomes:

1. Global Food Security and Hunger
Interest in and commitment to finding solutions for global food security and hunger continues to guide research and Extension to develop animal and crop production systems that thrive in variable conditions; advance new and improved systems of agricultural production that meet the needs of producers and consumers; enhance the value of agricultural products; improve access to high quality foods especially for consumers with limited resources; and increase food variety and value by developing new and enhanced food products.

2. Food Safety
Work in this area will focus on the development of methods, techniques, or processes to maintain or improve quality or functionality, stabilize or preserve foods, or prepare foods for further processing. Work in this area also includes understanding of food quality losses during preservation, storage, distribution, and marketing to enhance the quality and quantity of food delivered to consumers, minimize food costs, and enhance profitability for food producers and marketers. In addition, this area includes work on pathogenic food-borne microorganisms and parasites in raw, minimally processed, or inadequately processed and preserved foods.

3. Climate Change
Through the adoption of innovative technologies and cultural practices, agricultural producers, landscape designers, homeowners, and public land managers have the opportunity to lead and mitigate many influences of climate change. Projects work with agricultural producers to select low water use alternative crops, integrating applied research and extension to solve problems related to climate change.

4. Sustainable Energy
Global and domestic demands for sources of sustainable energy can be addressed through the production of bio-fuel crops. Research and extension programs bring together plant biochemists and ecologists and economists to study basic and applied approaches for the efficient production of non-food feed-stocks from forested and rangelands with limited freshwater availability as sustainable and renewable sources for biofuel generation with regional production systems.

5. Childhood Obesity, Nutrition and Health
The prevalence of childhood obesity has dramatically increased nationwide. Almost one-third of children in the U.S are overweight, obese, or at-risk for obesity; increasing their probability of developing chronic illnesses such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and Type 2 diabetes. The underlying causes of being overweight range from genetic propensity to socio-economic cultural and environmental influences resulting in unhealthful eating and low physical activity practices. Many of these issues stem from poverty-stricken nutrition. To effectively address obesity and malnutrition, programs are designed to effect change within families and communities. The project will address issues of weight management, nutritional intervention, educational methodology and common development for healthier environments.

(B) Cooperative Extension at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) – aka Smith-Lever Special Needs] Grants Program:

As outlined in the 2015 Plans of Work, the following are five examples of anticipated outcomes:

1. Global Food Security and Hunger
Interest in and commitment to finding solutions for global food security and hunger continues to guide research and extension to develop animal and crop production systems that thrive in variable conditions; advance new and improved systems of agricultural production that meet the needs of producers and consumers; enhance the value of agricultural products; improve access to high quality foods especially for consumers with limited resources; and increase food variety and value by developing new and enhanced food products.

2. Food Safety
Work in this area will focus on the development of methods, techniques, or processes to maintain or improve quality or functionality, stabilize, or preserve foods or prepare foods for further processing. Work in this area also includes understanding of food quality losses during preservation, storage, distribution and marketing to enhance the quality and quantity of food delivered to consumers, minimize food costs, and enhance profitability for food producers and marketers. In addition, this area includes work on pathogenic food-borne microorganisms and parasites in raw, minimally processed, or inadequately processed and preserved foods.

3. Climate Change
Through the adoption of innovative technologies and cultural practices, agricultural producers, landscape designers, homeowners, and public land managers have the opportunity to lead and mitigate many influences of climate change. Projects work with agricultural producers to select low water use alternative crops, integrating applied research and extension to solve problems related to climate change.

4. Sustainable Energy
Global and domestic demands for sources of sustainable energy can be addressed through the production of bio-fuel crops. Research and extension programs bring together plant biochemists and ecologists and economists to study basic and applied approaches for the efficient production of non-food feed-stocks from forested and rangelands with limited freshwater availability as sustainable and renewable sources for bio-fuel generation with regional production systems.

5. Childhood Obesity, Nutrition and Health
The prevalence of childhood obesity has dramatically increased nationwide. Almost one-third of children in the U.S are overweight, obese, or at-risk for obesity; increasing their probability of developing chronic illnesses such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and Type 2 diabetes. The underlying causes of being overweight range from genetic propensity to socio-economic cultural and environmental influences resulting in unhealthful eating and low physical activity practices. Many of these issues stem from poverty-stricken nutrition. To effectively address obesity and malnutrition, programs are designed to effect change within families and communities. The project will address issues of weight management, nutritional intervention, educational methodology and common development for healthier environments.

(C) Smith-Lever Special Needs [Sections 3 (b) & (c)] Competitive Grants Program:

For FY 2015:
Smith Lever Special Needs grants will address critical issues relating to preventing outbreaks of Avian Influenza, preparing the rural poor for disasters, preparedness and decision making for coastal areas, preparedness for migrant and seasonal farm workers, and other issues related to disaster preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery.

(D) Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions and (newly designated) Central State University (aka 1890 Capacity Building and/or CBG) Grants Program:

For FY 2015:
One administrative project was awarded to each of the 18 1890 institutions. The following describes proposed activities as outlined in the respective Plans of Work:

1. One project is to:
A) Conduct social, psychological, marketing, and economic impact surveys to develop profiles of communities and their economic landscape;
B) Develop educational bulletins, manuscripts, and documentation of findings and disseminate results and models to promote food security, community development, and empowerment of residents;
C) Conduct educational programs, events, and activities on leadership development and E-commerce strategies to facilitate economic and community development; and
D) Conduct educational programs, events, and activities to facilitate workforce development and financial management opportunities for limited-resource audiences.

2. The goal of this extension effort is to improve personal financial management skills, practices, and knowledge to enhance economic well-being for families. This is done directly by specialists and through training of agents to deliver research-based best information. Faculty will develop a long range plan for early intervention in financial, literacy and consumer education in targeted areas. The program will target consumer advocacy organizations and form partnerships with approximately 50 additional collaborators for program goal enhancement, program funding, and coalition.

(E) Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Capacity [(formerly known as “Formula”) aka Smith-Lever 3d EFNEP and/or ENUT] Grants Program:

For FY 2015:
Information is not yet available. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.

(F) Regional Integrated Pest Management Competitive Grants Programs:

(F-1) North Central Region (aka NC-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(F-2) Northeastern Region (aka NE-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(F-3) Southern Region (aka S-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(F-4) Western Region (aka W-RIPM):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

FARM SAFETY – COMBINED PROGRAMS (G), (H) & (W):

(G) Farm Safety;
(H) Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program (aka YFSEC); and
(W) Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities - National AgrAbility Project:

For FY 2015:
Anticipated New Awards:
• 3 new AgrAbility awards. (Panel concluded in June; recommendations being reviewed and processed.)
• 1 new YFSEC award.

FY 2015 Continuation Awards:
• 14 continuation awards to support 2nd year of State AgrAbility projects originally funded in FY 2014.
• 3 continuation awards to support 3rd year of State AgrAbility Projects originally funded in FY 2013.
• 1 continuation award for 4th year of the National AgrAbility Project, originally funded in FY 2012.

(I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE):

In FY 2015, the NTAE funds assisted in the development of a new strategic plan that has resulted in a new financial model through the eXtension Foundation with a new board of directors and executive director.

CHILDREN, YOUTH, AND FAMILIES (CYFAR) COMBINED PROGRAMS (J), (U) & (V) :

(J) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (aka Youth at Risk and/or CYFAR);
(U) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP); and
(V) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk - Sustainable Community
Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP):

For FY 2015:

The Alabama A & M CYFAR Project is in its fifth year of operation at two sites in Madison County. The program is implemented using the CYFAR National Outcome Parent/Family. The program impacts both youth and parents' reading skills. The program is designed to impact the cognitive, emotional and social development skills of youth ages 4-9 given that 82% of Alabama’s low-income youth in grade four performed below national reading standards.

The program is designed for parents to develop appropriate reading strategies to assess their child’s progress using the Journey’s core curriculum. The program is on target for accomplishing the targeted goals.

The Clemson University CYFAR SCP project serves youth at risk in both rural and urban settings. This fifth-year project serves two Spartanburg Elementary Schools. The project is designed to increase the delivery of an evidence-based science technology curriculum. The five year work plan indicates the following objectives: establishment of community partnerships, recruitment of volunteers, curriculum delivery, data collection, and pursuit of project sustainability.

New York’s CYFAR project entitled Youth Community Action Network (CAN) is designed to promote civic engagement and workforce development. This is the second year of operation for the CAN project. The project is implemented under the Teen CYFAR National Outcome. It operates in two sites: Buffalo and Albany. The program is designed to assist youth in their college aspirations related to the STEM fields. As well, the teen leadership component will serve the project through paid internships in line with their career aspirations. The Project Director has completed the appropriate required NIFA reports; the project is therefore recommended for continued funding.

The University of Nebraska CYFAR Project is in its second year of implementation. The goals of the project include youth engagement in healthy diet and physical activity and helping families develop skills to provide an environment that can access safe, nutritious, and balanced meals while incorporating physical activity. The program uses four curricula which includes: BodyWorks, SPARK, Fast Foods, and Kidquest. The project has presented a viable work plan for year two which includes the recruitment of additional community partners. The program is on target for accomplishing the targeted goals. The Project Director has completed the appropriate required NIFA reports; the project is therefore recommended for continued funding.

The Alaska CYFAR Project focuses on life skill development and workforce preparation. The project seeks to reduce the homelessness and unemployment among teens aging out of state custody at two sites in Alaska. The program will address the needs of youth in foster care. The featured curricula includes Build Your Future and STEPS to a Healthy Teen.

(K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education-Professional Development (aka Chapter 3 and/or SARE-PD):

Project types formerly funded under this line will now be supported and reported under CFDA 10.215

NOTES:
(1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account.
(2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details.

(L) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP):

For FY 2015:
NIFA continued, the Muscogee (Creek) Nation youth participated in 4-H with two Muscogee youth serving as Northeast District Officers and many more serving as county officers. In Muskogee County, the educator reached over 400 children with his robotics, straw rockets, and liquid nitrogen workshops. Livestock management and an archery camp complete this effort, which serves 4,400 youth.

The program assistants introduced Muscogee youth to a new curriculum called “Take a Stand,” an anti-bullying curriculum. School systems within the Muscogee Nation boundaries have been excited about the opportunity to provide this type of information to their students. Other programs will continue as described.

All three South Dakota FRTEP programs are working collectively to address the lack of access to nutritious on their reservations where many rely on convenience stores which have very little fresh food. All three South Dakota FRTEP projects are partners on a 2014 Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program to stimulate local food production in each FRTEP service area. The Pine Ridge and Cheyenne River projects worked with United Tribes Technical College on an agriculture and food program for Lakota Nations Education conference. Rosebud and Pine Ridge also provided Risk Management Education programs and agro-enterprise meetings between tribal partners SDSU and State of South Dakota.

EXTENSION AT 1994 INSTITUTIONS COMBINED PROGRAMS (M) & (BB) :

(M) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and/or TCEP); and
(BB) Tribal Colleges Extension-Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE):

In FY 2015 Diné College provided in-depth training to 25 farmers and ranchers on the Navajo Reservation. The project is a partnership with tribal grazing officials and farm boards. Three trainings have been held so far including one on livestock reproduction conducted with New Mexico State University and a farm taxation workshop presented by Utah State University. The Land Grant Staff have been conducting one-on-one visits monthly with the producer to continue to work toward their management goals. The in-depth mentoring will allow this select group of producers to share their knowledge and spread best-management practices over a wider area. A garden Cottonwood Days School began in the spring of 2015.

Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute was the first 1994 Land Grant to use special emphasis funding to combine workshops in indigenous arts and crafts with business plan training so that tribal members with talent in indigenous arts could choose to earn an income from their talent. The model has now been embraced by other tribal schools. The workshop on developing an artist's portfolio drew 99 participants. An American Indian photographer visited the campus to take photos of artisans' work that they can use for marketing. In addition, 134 reservation citizens received financial literacy and business skills information.

RENEWABLE RESOURCES EXTENSION ACT COMBINED PROGRAMS (N) & (O) :

(N) Renewable Resources Extension Act (aka RREA); and
(O) Renewable Resources Extension Act- National Focus Fund Projects (aka RREA-NFF):

For FY 2015:
Information is not yet available at this time. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.

(P) Rural Health and Safety Education (Competitive) Grants Program (aka RHSE):

For FY 2015:
Information is not available at this time. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.
(Q) 1890 Facilities Grant Program and Tuskegee and (newly designated) Central State University (aka Section 1447):

For FY 2015:
Renewal applications were received for the third year of the Five-Year Plan of Work (2013-2017). The funds will be used to support on-going facilities improvements and/or construction at the respective institutions.

(R) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD):

For FY 2015:
Funded Project Network Node 1: Coordinates national program, develop pharmacokinetic modeling approaches and provide pharmacokinetic support to FARAD components, and on a rotating schedule with other network nodes, provide responses to emergency queries (telephone, internet) from the FARAD Hotline.

Funded Project Network Node 2: Maintains the pharmacokinetic, bibliographic and call center databases and web-based access to the kinetic and bibliographic citation files. On a rotating basis with other network nodes, this node also provides responses to drug and contaminant residue questions submitted to FARAD.

Funded Project Network Node 3: Collects and enters data for the U.S. Approved Animal Drugs Database (US-AADD), maintains internet websites for FARAD, creates and supports platforms for mobile devices to access the Veterinarian's Guide to Residue Avoidance Management (VetGRAM) and other mobile-friendly applications, and distributes electronic alerts and updates via email, Twitter, and other electronic formats.

Funded Project Network Node 4: On a rotating schedule with other network nodes, provides responses to emergency telephone calls from the FARAD hotline. Collaboration between all institutions occurs on research.

(S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development and/or RYD Grants Program):

For FY 2015:
The projection is that these community youth development projects will be facilitated in much the same way as reported in previous years and will have similar outcomes.

(T) Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka ARPA, ERME and/or RME Program):

For FY 2015:
In May 2015 USDA/NIFA announced the availability of five awards and made a request for the Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnerships Grant Program (ARME) Competitive Grants Program applications for fiscal year (FY) 2015 and each year thereafter through FY 2017. The amount available for support of this program in FY 2015 is approximately $4.5 million. The grant deadline was July 6, 2015. A panel of reviewers met in July 2015 to select the five ARME Centers for funding FY 2015-17.

Regional sub-awards made through streamlining agreements between NIFA and the regional ERME Centers are anticipated to be made no later than September 1, 2015.

(U) – CYFAR-SCP and (V) – CYFAR-PDTA are part of the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS.

NOTE: See (J) - CYFAR above for pertinent details regarding the COMBINED CYFAR PROGRAMS (J), (U) & (V).

(W) – AgrAbility is part of the COMBINED FARM SAFETY PROGRAMS.
N OTE: See (G) – Farm Safety and (H) – YFSEC above for pertinent details.

(X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (aka IPM-CS):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act:

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(Z) Military Family Readiness System (aka MFRS):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(AA) Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY):

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(BB) Tribal Colleges Extension Program- Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) – Programs Combined - See CFDA 10.500 (M) above.

(CC) District of Columbia Public Secondary Education Reorganization Act Program (CES-Formula):

For FY 2015:

In the Urban Families, Youth and Communities program area, the Land Grant Programs continue to sponsor community events in support of urban agriculture and urban sustainability such as the Quality of Life Day Festival and the Urban Agricultural Fair. The Quality of Life Day Festival is held in various wards of the city and is a day-long activity that includes demonstrations, presentations, hands-on experiences, handouts, food, and fun for city residents. The Urban Agricultural Fair is hosted at the Station's Muirkirk Research Farm in Beltsville, Maryland and is attended by participating DC Public Schools, grades four through seven. Students, along with teachers and parents, spend a day at the farm to learn more about their natural, built, and social environment. Various Stations are provided, including but not limited to: Wetlands on Wheels; Horticulture; Sustainable Agriculture; Water Quality and Research; Weather Station; Sustainable Communities; Youth Leadership; Nutrition and Health; Arts and Crafts; Marine Science; Basic Soils; and
Junior Master Gardeners. The fair is held each year in mid-May.

In the Sustainable Energy program area, an experimental digestor was built that converts cow manure and agricultural waste into methane-rich biogas that can be used as alternate energy resources to generate electricity or thermal energy. The research in this study focuses on the feasibility of the design of an operational digestor; the monitoring and control of the different biodegradation process variables and experiments to boost or maximize the gas production; and the analysis of the biogas produced, using a Gas Chromatograph (CG) with Flame Ionization Detector (FID) to separate the methane from carbon dioxide. The economic viability of this technology, advantages, and the production cost compared to other renewable energy resources are also compared. Technology will be promoted for community based sustainable energy projects in the District of Columbia.



For Fiscal Year 2015:

(A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [aka Smith-Lever 3 (b) & (c) Capacity (formerly known as “Formula”)] Grants Programs:

As outlined in the 2015 Plans of Work, the following are five examples of anticipated outcomes:

1. Global Food Security and Hunger
Interest i