Cooperative Extension Service

 

GENERAL: [As reflected in Part I,B. of the Request for Applications (RFA) or Capacity Requests for Applications (Capacity RFA)] 1. Smith-Lever (3b) & (c) Capacity Grants (formerly known as Formula Funds) a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (formerly known as 3b & c Formula Funds) These funds are used by institutions eligible to receive funds under the Act of Congress approved July second, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, entitled ??An Act donating public lands to the several States and Territories which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts?? (Twelfth Statutes at Large, page five hundred and three) (?1862 Land-grant Institutions?), for the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending or resident in 1862 Land-grant Institutions in the several communities, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects. The purpose of this funding is to conduct agricultural extension work. (b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) ? The purpose of this funding is to increase the level of agricultural extension work. These funds are used to support extension activities identified in the eligible institution?s approved 5-Year Plan of Work. Special Needs funds are allocated to a State Cooperative Extension Service to fulfill a purpose or overcome a condition peculiar to the State, as compared to the country as a whole, or for a purpose not normally a part of the continuing extension program. (c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program Funds support innovative extension education approaches to addressing risks, hazards and disasters. The Cooperative Extension Service (CES) has an important role in reducing the impact of disasters through extension education. The Extension Special Needs program sponsors targeted projects that enable CES to assist in preparing for, providing an educational response to, and recovering from disasters. Education programming funded by this program will help communities, families and individuals become more self-sustaining by strengthening and increasing their resiliency to disaster. Some types of hazards and disaster related events funded in previous years include uncertainties caused by losses of economic infrastructure, severe weather or other natural disasters, security breaches, human disease, or high consequence animal diseases and plant pests. There has been an increase in public awareness regarding the number and severity of disaster type critical incidents involving earthquakes, tsunamis, tornadoes, wildfire, drought, contagious disease, and terrorist events. The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Environment and Natural Resources and the Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction of the National Science and Technology Council have acknowledged the many effective roles that the Cooperative Extension System (CES) has played in disaster preparedness, response and remediation. Within the states and territories, the CES has repeatedly served as the trusted community organization that has helped to enable families, communities, and businesses to successfully prepare for, respond to and cope with disaster losses and critical incidents. Once a disaster has occurred, the local extension outreach includes: 1) Communicating practical science-based risk information, 2) Developing relevant educational experiences and programs, 3) Working with individuals and communities to open new communication channels, and 4) Mitigating losses and facilitating recovery. Never was this more evident than after hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005 and during the 2008 Midwestern Summer flooding. During and after these incidents, local Extension agents served as a critical communication node throughout affected urban and rural areas, particularly when traditional communication systems were temporarily overwhelmed or destroyed. The Extension Special Needs RFA encourages proposals that specifically address one or more of the following six key target areas: 1. Education and Technical assistance through inter-disciplinary and multi-state disaster training programs and demonstration projects for problem solving, especially those which build upon already existing strengths, contribute to or expand the EDEN and/or eXtension educational materials related to disaster preparation, mitigation, response and recovery; 2. Collaboration with Federal, state and local agencies and other disaster relief organizations to support education and service activities that enhance recovery of impacted rural communities, schools, businesses and agricultural-based activities; 3. Long range family, community and regional planning projects that will enhance implementation of programs that serve public needs in preparation for, during and after emergency situations within impacted States and across impacted regions; 4. Communication delivery of key information that meets end-users? needs in a timely fashion with consideration of potentially limited communication channels due to disaster situations; 5. Dissemination of credible, science-based information that is reliable and easily accessible even if electronic access is compromised; and 6. Integrated Research and Extension Planning Projects (up to $15,000) are intended to provide assistance to applicants in bringing together teams for the development of highly competitive grant proposals where extension personnel would apply for large grants (in excess of $250,000) from other grant programs (e.g., the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative and etc?) and lead nationally important disaster prevention, protection and mitigation projects. Fundable projects should support education and extension activities which: 1. Reduce risk through planning, disaster preparedness and emergency response by improving communication between the public, community leaders, state and Federal agencies; 2. Develop strategies and educational materials and/or programming in the area of emergency planning, infrastructure design and disaster recovery operation; 3. Develop community networks that provide real-time disaster education information; and/or 4. Develop or expand educational materials regarding disaster issues suitable for use and distribution by the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN) or the eXtension Community of Practice working with disaster planning. (d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement) Capacity grants (formerly known as "Formula") authorized under the CSRS Retirement Contributions Program. These grants are used to defray the CSRS Retirement costs to the 1862 land-grant institutions for the former Schedule A Appointments who conduct agricultural extension work. Fiscal Year 2014 represented the last year that NIFA published a RFA for this program. (e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement) These grants are used to defray the FERS Retirement costs to the 1862 land-grant institutions for the former Schedule A Appointments who conduct agricultural extension work. (f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC These funds are used by the University of the District of Columbia for the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending the University of the District of Columbia, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects. 2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and (newly designated) Central State University (Section 1444) The purpose of this funding is to support agricultural and forestry extension activities at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and Central State University. 3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d): (a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education) These grants are used to assist all States in carrying out a program of extension activities designed to employ and train professional and paraprofessional aides to engage in direct nutrition education of low-income families and in other appropriate nutrition education programs. (b) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (d) Farm Safety Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (e) New Technologies at Ag Extension Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (f) Pest Management Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD) Effective FY 2014, this Program was consolidated under Research. See CFDA 10.215 for pertinent details. (h) Federally Recognized Tribes Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (j) EIPM Support Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (k) EIPM Coordination Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. 4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES: (a) Renewable Resources Extension Act The purpose of the grant program is to provide funds for projects that: (1) Have national or regional relevancy; (2) Develop new and innovative projects that can be replicated at other institutions; or (3) Develop a strategic framework for the nationwide forest and rangeland resources extension program. NFF priorities are those that have been identified in the FY 2005-2009 RREA Strategic Plan: http://www.nifa.usda.gov/nea/nre/in_focus/forests_if_rrea.html. (b) Rural Health and Safety As specified in 7 U.S.C. 2662, grants will be made to establish the Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Programs carried out by the eligible organizations in rural areas. The assistance provided by these programs, to the extent practicable, shall be coordinated with and delivered in cooperation with similar services or assistance by other Federal Agencies or programs for rural residents. (c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions This program provides funding to (1) increase Extension program capacity at 1994 institutions; and (2) address special needs, take advantage of important opportunities, and/or demonstrate long-term sustained benefits of Extension projects at 1994 institutions. In FY 2009, funded projects will support one or more of the six NIFA Strategic Goals (see Part VIII, E., Definitions) outlined in the NIFA Strategic Plan for FY 2007-2012: 1) Enhance international competitiveness of American agriculture; 2) Enhance the competitiveness and sustainability of rural and farm economies; 3) Support increased economic opportunities and improved quality of life in rural America; 4) Enhance protection and safety of the Nation's agriculture and food supply; 5) Improve the Nation's nutrition and health; and 6) Protect and enhance the Nation's natural resource base and environment. (d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions As specified in 7 U.S.C. 7630, grants will be made to establish pilot projects to expand the youth development programs carried out by the eligible organizations in rural areas or small towns. Broad Purposes: ? Support and enhance the goals, objectives, and priorities of the eligible youth organizations; ? Support programs which address issues and needs of rural youth; ? Involve youth in design and implementation of their educational activities; ? Increase knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors necessary for rural youth to live productive, contributing, and fulfilling lives; and ? Increase economic opportunities and sustainability and improve quality of life in rural communities through enhanced human, social, civic, natural, financial, cultural, and built capital. (e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) The purpose of the FARAD is to provide livestock producers, extension specialists, scientists, and veterinarians with up to date information to prevent drug, pesticide and environmental contaminant residues in food animal products. (f) Federal Administration Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447) The 1890 Facilities Grants Program provides funds for the acquisition and improvement of agricultural and food sciences facilities and equipment, including libraries, so that the 1890 land-grant institutions, Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and (newly designated) Central State University, may participate fully in the production of human capital in the food and agricultural sciences. (h) Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnership Grants Program (aka ARPA & RME & ERME) Pertinent details will be provided at a future date.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
10.500
Federal Agency/Office
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of Agriculture
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
A - Formula Grants; B - Project Grants
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2017 Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 – ACTIVE Programs: In Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, the amount available for awards was $455,489,177, after legislatively mandated set-asides. (A), (B) and (CC) - Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (LGIs) and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (aka DCPPERA) (A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions For Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, approximately $300 million was appropriated for the Smith-Lever 3(b) & (c) Programs. Per the Budget Office, $289,045,417 was available for awards for this Program. Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions were allocated funds to support Extension activities. Awards ranged from $1,133,542 to $13,255,226. (B) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (Smith-Lever Special Needs) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2017: Special Needs program was allocated $1,029,979 to support individual projects that may be initiated under this program. Awards ranged from $11,347 to 111,504. (CC) University of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) In Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, $1,204,360 (representing the Appropriation, less the legislatively mandated set-asides), was available to fund this program allocated solely to the University of the District of Columbia (UDC). There is no matching requirement for this program. Administrative costs are taken from Smith-Lever funds. (C ) Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program [Section 3 (b) & (c )] Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) funded Smith Lever Special Needs projects to implement applied scientific programs that serve public needs in preparation for, during and after local or regional emergency situations or disasters. The program received eight (8) applications and awarded six (6) projects, totaling $461,619. (D) Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University, and Central State University – (aka 1890 LGIs) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: Approximately $45.5 million was appropriated for this program to support the Extension programs at the 19 1890 Land-Grant Universities, in 18 states. After legislatively authorized set-asides, approximately $43.7 million was available for awards. Funds are distributed on a formula basis. This program requires a dollar for dollar match. However, NIFA may consider and approve matching waiver requests above the 50 percent level. (E) & (EE) - Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (aka EFNEP) [Smith-Lever - Section 3 (d)] and EFNEP WebNEERS (Competitive) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2017: The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) brings together federal, state, and local resources to target two (2) primary audiences: low-income families with young children and low-income youth. The program is delivered by the 1862 and the 1890 Land-Grant Institutions. Since 1969, EFNEP has reached more than 33 million low-incomes families and youth, improving their diets and food-related behaviors. Each year EFNEP enrolls nearly half a million new program participants. In FY 2017, EFNEP received $67,417,320 in federal funding. EFNEP reached 108,216 adults and 366,327 youth directly; and more than 300,000 family members indirectly (source: EFNEP’s evaluation and reporting system, WebNEERS; see https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resource/EFNEP-2017-Annual-Report.pdf). 82% of EFNEP participants who reported income were at or below 100% of poverty, earning $24,600 a year or less for a family of four (4). At least 71% of all EFNEP adults identify as minorities. This is significant because poor health disproportionately affects minority and low-income populations. EFNEP consistently demonstrates strong results. FY 2017 data confirms adult graduates: • Improve their diets: 94% report more closely following dietary recommendations, including consuming an extra 1/2 cup of fruits and vegetables • Improve their nutrition practices: 89% improve nutrition practices, such as making healthier food choices and reading nutrition labels • Stretch their food dollars farther: 84% improve food resource management practices, such as planning meals and shopping with a grocery list • Handle food more safely: 65% improve food safety practices, such as storing and thawing food properly • Increase their physical activity rates: 40% increase their physical activity level by 30 minutes or more (G), (H) & (W) – Farm Safety, Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification, and Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities (AgrAbility Project) NOTE: Programs were combined in FY 2012. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Congress consolidated Extension 3(d) line items Farm Safety (AgrAbility) and Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification into a single line item. In FY 2017, after legislatively mandated set asides, approximately $4,423,770 was available to support Farm Safety (i.e., AgrAbility) and Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification (YFSEC) programs. Of the above amount, $4,123,770 was made available to support AgrAbility projects: 17 continuation awards, all State/Regional AgrAbility Projects (SRAPs); one (1) continuation National AgrAbility Project (NAP); and three (3) new SRAPs. All AgrAbility projects are partnerships between Cooperative Extension at 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Colleges and Universities and private non-profit organizations that provide direct service to individuals with disabilities. SRAPs and NAP focus on increasing the likelihood that individuals with disabilities and their families engaged in production agriculture (AgrAbility’s customers) will become more successful. NIFA received ten (10) new SRAP proposals in FY 2017 and competitively funded three (3). Funding ratio was 30%. In FY 2017, NIFA had $300,000 available for YFSEC projects. Applications were solicited for three (3) different types of projects: (1) Safety in Agriculture for Youth (SAY) National Clearinghouse Project – to continue efforts made to date with SAY Clearinghouse, curricula submission and review, marketing of the Clearinghouse, and SAY National Steering Committee. (2) YFSEC Instructor Training Project – to support recruitment and training of youth farm safety instructors in currently available youth farm safety curricula. (3) YFSEC Youth Training Project – to continue with development of new/enhancement of current youth farm safety curricula, implementation/piloting of those curricula with youth, and evaluation of youth training. NIFA received six (6) YFSEC proposals and competitively awarded funding to three (3). Funding ratio was 50%. Each of the projects was approved funding for four (4) years, at $100,000 per year. (I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE) In Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, NIFA awarded a continuation grant in the amount of $1,488,000 to the New Technologies for Ag Extension (NTAE) program, and eXtension continued to work from its FY 2015-2018 strategic plan which charged eXtension to apply its technology expertise and broad national network to become a major catalyst for increasing innovation and the impact of Cooperative Extension Service (CES) professionals’ work throughout the entire CES. (J), (U) & (V) - Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (aka CYFAR), Sustainable Community Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development and Technical Assistance (aka CYFAR-PDTA) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2017: Total CYFAR funding was $8,054,025. Sustainable Community Project funding represented 45 successful applicants (new and continued awards) and successful applicants will receive $7,040,000 for Fiscal Year 2017. The funding ratio for new projects was 10%. The CYFAR Professional and Development and Technical Assistance (PDTA) funding was $563,340. The CYFAR Military PDTA funding was $450,000. (L) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP) In Fiscal Year 2017, the FRTEP program began a new four-year continuation. NIFA awarded $2,912,490 to 36 extension offices through its 1862 Land Grant Universities. Awards will range from $68,580 to $123,000. $35,000 from the $123,000 award was used to support all 36 Extension offices along with attendance at the 2017 Extension Professional Development conference in Polson, Montana. (M) & (BB) - Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions Program (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and TCEP) and Tribal Colleges Extension - Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: The program awarded $ 4,262,160 to states to support informal community education at the 1994 Land Grant institutions. As in 2016, roughly $3.2 million was funded in capacity to support Extension offices at 32 institutions. In addition, $1.1 million went to 14 special emphasis awards, given to 13 institutions. One school received two special emphasis projects. As in 2016, two schools decided not to participate in the program in 2017. Tribal Colleges Extension (TCEP) funds community based, informal learning on rural reservations. Programs mainly involve youth development and may also include the promotion of rural entrepreneurship, healthy lifestyles and production agriculture. Every other year eligible institutions can complete for Tribal Colleges Extension - Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE) which funds pilot projects for informal, community focused learning. In FY 2017, both TECP capacity and special emphasis were in a continuation cycle. Capacity grants were in their fourth year of a four year cycle. (N) & (O) - Renewable Resources Extension Act Program – (aka RREA) and - National Focus Fund (Competitive) Projects (aka RREA-NFF) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: Capacity program impacts resulted in: • Number of educational events – 5,888 • Number of landowners adopting at least one new management practice – 321,028 • Number of forest and rangeland acres impacted – 36,350,661 • Number of management plans developed – 2,088 • Number of forest, range, fish and wildlife income-generating businesses created or expanded –2,431 • Number of new jobs created – 379 (P) Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: The total amount available for awards was $2,877,637. 18 proposals received 9 proposals funded Represents 50 percent acceptance rate (Q) 1890 Facilities Grant Program (aka Section 1447 Grants) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: The appropriated amount was $19,730,000. The amount available to support 19 facilities projects (one per 1890 land-grant university) was $18,940,800. Funding levels ranged from $701,302 to $1,510,956. (R) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD) For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 award cycle, Congress appropriated $1,200,000 to support FARAD, which was funded under its own line item authority. Four (4) applications were received and evaluated under competition waiver administrative processes. FARAD applications were merit reviewed internally by National Program Staff and all four (4) entities were funded. This 31-year-old high performing integrated consortium of collaborating institutions currently includes at each Land Grant campus a lead Project Director (PD), and his/her respective scientific staff. The funding ratio for this program in FY 2017 was 100% due to the competition waiver process. FARAD is a university-based national program that serves as the nation’s primary source for scientifically-based recommendations regarding safe withdrawal intervals of drugs (used off label) and chemicals in food-producing animals. As such, FARAD is a key resource for protection of our nation's food supply, including meat, milk and eggs, against accidental contamination of animal-derived foods with residues of drugs, pesticides or other agents that could compromise food safety. (T) Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program); NOTE: Mandatory program delegated to another USDA agency (Risk Management Agency) but administered by NIFA. The amount available for support of this last year continuation grant in Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 was: $4,468,800. Five (5) proposals were submitted, accepted and underwent a Noncompetitive Review NIFA National Program Leader. All five (5) were recommended to receive funding for “Agriculture Risk Management Education” grant. The following amounts were awarded to the five (5) institutions throughout the United States are: • North Central RME Center: $ 1,087,536 • Digital Center for RME: $ 360,768 • Western RME Center: $ 1,087,536 • Northeastern Center for RME: $ 850,224 • Southern RME Center: $ 1,082,736 (DD) Healthy Homes Partnership Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: One (1) award for $225,000 was provided to a Coordinating Institution that administered sub awards to 10 state level participating land-grant universities. The purpose of the Healthy Homes Partnership is to link the resources of the USDA National Institute of Food & Agriculture Land Grant Universities with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes for a public outreach program that reduces housing deficiencies and risks associated with childhood diseases and injuries. The project reduced hazards in the home related to air quality (carbon monoxide, radon, and mold), drinking water, pests, and pesticides to improve families’ health resulting in decrease in asthma & allergies and improved home safety. (GG) Agriculture in the Classroom Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: NIFA provided $529,920 to support Agriculture in the Classroom (AITC). AITC programs were implemented by state-operated programs to improve agricultural literacy, awareness, knowledge, and appreciation among pre-K through 12th-grade teachers and their students. In FY 2017, AITC’s curriculum website had over 111,000 visitors who accessed 397 standards-based lesson plans and 722 companion resources. Over 1 million teachers and 7 million students were reached through direct contact through AITC staff and volunteers in FY 2017. (HH) Air Force Personal Financial Readiness Program Evaluation Development Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: Program not established until Fiscal Year (FY) 2018. (II) Substance Abuse Program at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas The actual funding for Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 was $383,254. (JJ) Food and Agriculture Service Learning Program In Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 the Teaching Awards (TA) program had $100,000 available to support grants. There was no competition in FY 2017. The grantee was awarded a no-cost extension. The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (F) Pest Management; NOTE: Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education - Professional Development (aka SARE-PD) NOTE: SARE Chapters 1 & 3 were combined in FY 2014. See CFDA # 10.215. (S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development Grants Program and RYD); (X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (IPM-CS); Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act; (AA) Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY); and (FF) 4-H Military Partnership Professional Development and Technical Assistance Program (4HMP-PDTA).
Fiscal Year 2018 Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 – ACTIVE Programs: (A), (B) and (CC) - Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (aka CES Smith-Lever Regular and CES Smith-Lever Special Needs), and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (aka DCPPERA) [Section 3 (b) & (c )] - (Capacity previously known as Formula) (A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (Regular) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions and University of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program were allocated $288,538,091 to support Extension activities. Awards ranged from $1,137,893 to $13,313,464. The total amount of required matching funds in FY 2018 was $282,147,013. 1862 Land-Grant Institutions in the 50 States must match 100 percent of the Smith-Lever Special Needs (SLSN) funds they receive with funds from non-Federal sources such as State or county appropriations. There was no matching requirement for the University of the District of Columbia. (B) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Smith-Lever Special Needs) (Capacity Grant Program) Special Needs program was allocated $1,029,979 to support individual projects that may be initiated under this program. Awards ranged from $11,347 to $111,504. (C ) Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program [Section 3 (b) & (c )] The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) funded Smith Lever Special Needs projects to implement applied scientific programs that serve public needs in preparation for, during and after local or regional emergency situations or disasters. The program received 11 applications and awarded six projects, totaling $461,844 (CC) - University of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) In Fiscal Year (FY) 2018, $1,212,160 (representing the Appropriation, less the legislatively mandated set-asides), was available to fund this program allocated solely to the University of the District of Columbia (UDC). There is no matching requirement for this program. Administrative costs are taken from Smith-Lever funds. (D) Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University, and Central State University – (aka 1890 LGIs and Section 1444) -(Capacity, previously known as Formula) For Fiscal Year (FY) 2018, $45,620,000 was appropriated for this program to support the Extension programs at the 1890 Land-Grant Universities, 19 in 18 states. The amount available for awards, after the legislatively authorized/mandated set-asides was $43,795,200. Funds are distributed on a formula basis. This program requires a dollar for dollar match. However, NIFA may consider and approve matching waiver requests above the 50 percent level. NIFA approved 7 matching waiver requests for program supported with funds in FY 2018. (E) & (EE) - Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (aka EFNEP) [Smith-Lever - Section 3 (d)] - (Capacity previously known as Formula) and EFNEP WebNEERS (Competitive) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2018: The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) brings together federal, state, and local resources to target two (2) primary audiences: low-income families with young children and low-income youth. The program is delivered by the 1862 and the 1890 Land-Grant Institutions. Since 1969, EFNEP has reached more than 34 million low-incomes families and youth, improving their diets and food-related behaviors. Each year EFNEP enrolls nearly half a million new program participants. In FY 2018, EFNEP received $67,417,320 in federal funding. EFNEP reached 90,325 adults and 345,440 youth directly; and more than 250,000 family members indirectly (source: EFNEP’s evaluation and reporting system, WebNEERS; see 2018 Impacts on https:/2/nifa.usda.gov/program/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-efnep). 81% of EFNEP participants who reported income were at or below 100% of poverty, earning $25,100 a year or less for a family of four (4). At least 72% of all EFNEP adults identify as minorities. This is significant because poor health disproportionately affects minority and low-income populations. EFNEP consistently demonstrates strong results. In FY 2018 a new research tested Adult Food and Physical Activity Questionnaire was used. Results show adult graduates: • Improve their diets: 91% improved their diet quality practices. • Stretch their food dollars farther: 80% improve food resource management practices, such as planning meals and shopping with a grocery list • Handle food more safely: 76% improve food safety practices, such as storing and thawing food properly • Active more often: 77% increase their physical activity practices (G), (H) & (W) – Farm Safety, Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification, and Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities (AgrAbility Project) NOTE: Programs were combined in FY 2012. In FY 2012 Congress consolidated Extension 3(d) line items Farm Safety (AgrAbility) and Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification (YFSEC) into a single line item. In FY 2018, after legislatively mandated set asides, approximately $4,417,289 was available to support AgrAbility and YFSEC competitive grant programs. Of the above amount, $4,117,289 was made available to support AgrAbility projects: 7 continuation awards, all State/Regional AgrAbility Projects (SRAPs); one (1) continuation National AgrAbility Project (NAP); and fourteen (14) new SRAPs. Of this amount, $300,000 was used to support three (3) YFSEC continuation awards. All AgrAbility projects are partnerships between Cooperative Extension at 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Colleges and Universities and private non-profit organizations that provide direct service to individuals with disabilities. SRAPs and NAP focus on increasing the likelihood that individuals with disabilities and their families engaged in production agriculture (AgrAbility’s customers) will become more successful. NIFA received nineteen (19) new SRAP proposals in FY 2018 and competitively funded fourteen (14). Funding ratio was 74%. (I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE) In Fiscal Year (FY) 2018, NIFA awarded a continuation grant in the amount of $1,488,000 to the New Technologies for Ag Extension (NTAE) program. In 2017, eXtension continued to work from its FY 2015-2018 strategic plan which charged eXtension to apply its technology expertise and broad national network to become a major catalyst for increasing innovation and the impact of Cooperative Extension Service (CES) professionals’ work throughout the entire CES. (J), (U), (V) & (FF) - Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (aka CYFAR), Sustainable Community Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP); Professional Development and Technical Assistance (aka CYFAR-PDTA); and Military Partnership FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2018: Total CYFAR funding was $8,054,025. Sustainable Community Project funding represented 45 successful applicants (new and continued awards) and successful applicants will receive $7,040,000.00 for Fiscal Year 2018. The funding ratio for new projects was 17%. The CYFAR Professional and Development and Technical Assistance (PDTA) funding was $563,340. The CYFAR Military PDTA funding was $450,000. (L) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP) In Fiscal Year 2018, the FRTEP program continued the second year into a new four-year continuation. NIFA awarded $2,912,490 to 36 extension offices through its 1862 Land Grant Universities. Awards ranged from $68,580 to $122,000. Funds were used to support all 36 Extension offices, including attendance at the 2018 Extension Professional Development Conference in Tulsa, OK. (M) & (BB) - Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions Program (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and TCEP) and Tribal Colleges Extension - Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) Tribal Colleges Extension (TCEP) funds community based, informal learning on rural reservations. Programs mainly involve youth development and may also include the promotion of rural entrepreneurship, healthy lifestyles and production agriculture. Every other year eligible institutions can complete for Tribal Colleges Extension - Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE) which funds pilot projects for informal, community focused learning. Extension capacity and Extension Special Emphasis both fall under continuations which means applicants complete once and receive annual allotments of funding for multiple “out years” that conclude in a set timeframe. At the conclusion of a funding cycle a new grant competition is held. TCEP capacity grants provide a baseline of funding for extension operations over a four-year period. TCEP special emphasis provides funding for pilot projects over a two year cycle. In 2018 the TCEP capacity was paneled and TCEP Special Emphasis was paneled. The program awarded $6,171,488 to states to support informal community education at the 1994 Land Grant institutions. In 2018 33 proposals were accepted for review and for TCEP capacity 33 were awarded. The TCEP Special Emphasis is competitive and 23 proposals were submitted and 11 were awarded. (N) & (O) - Renewable Resources Extension Act Program – (aka RREA) (Capacity, previously known as Formula) and - National Focus Fund (Competitive) Projects (aka RREA-NFF) Capacity program impacts resulted in: • Number of educational events – 5,945 • Number of landowners adopting at least one new management practice – 134,892 • Number of forest and rangeland acres impacted – 19,915,053 • Number of management plans developed – 5,062 • Number of forest, range, fish and wildlife income-generating businesses created or expanded – 5,144 • Number of new jobs created – 558 (P) Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education) $2,871,015.00 25 applications were reviewed 9 proposals funded Represents 36 percent acceptance rate (Q) 1890 Facilities Grant Program (aka Section 1447 Grants) The appropriated amount was $19,730,000. The amount available to support 19 facilities projects was $18,940,800, (one per 1890 land-grant university). Funding levels ranged from $701,302 to $1,510,956. (R) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD) For the Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 award cycle, Congress appropriated $2.5 million. The amount available for awards was $2.4 million to support FARAD, which was funded under its own line item authority. Five (5) applications were received and evaluated under competition waiver administrative processes. FARAD applications were merit reviewed internally by National Program Staff and all five (5) entities were funded. This 32-year-old high performing integrated consortium of collaborating institutions currently includes at each Land Grant campus a lead Project Director (PD), and his/her respective scientific staff. The funding ratio for this program in FY 2018 was 100% due to the competition waiver process. FARAD is a university-based national program that serves as the nation’s primary source for scientifically-based recommendations regarding safe withdrawal intervals of drugs (used off label) and chemicals in food-producing animals. As such, FARAD is a key resource for protection of our nation's food supply, including meat, milk and eggs, against accidental contamination of animal-derived foods with residues of drugs, pesticides or other agents that could compromise food safety. (T) Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program); NOTE: Mandatory program delegated to another USDA agency (Risk Management Agency) but administered by NIFA. In FY 2018, NIFA announced the Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnerships (RME) Program Centers as a Competitive Grant in the amount of $4,483,200 to be divided among the host centers as follows: • Digital Center for RME: $355,968 • Northeastern Center for RME: $879,024 • Southern Center for RME: $1,082,736 • North Central Center for RME: $ 1,082,736 • Western Center for RME: $1,082,736 The grant deadline was April 27, 2018. Six (6) proposals were submitted and reviewed by a panel of four (4) reviewers. Five (5) proposals were recommended for funding. (DD) Healthy Homes Partnership One (1) award for $315,000 was provided to a Coordinating Institution that administered sub awards to 10 state-level participating land-grant universities. The purpose of the Healthy Homes Partnership is to link the resources of the USDA National Institute of Food & Agriculture Land Grant Universities with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes for a public outreach program that reduces housing deficiencies and risks associated with childhood diseases and injuries. The project reduced hazards in the home related to air quality (carbon monoxide, radon, and mold), drinking water, pests, and pesticides to improve families’ health resulting in decrease in asthma & allergies and improved home safety. (GG) Agriculture in the Classroom NIFA provided $529,920 to support Agriculture in the Classroom (AITC). AITC programs were implemented by state-operated programs to improve agricultural literacy, awareness, knowledge, and appreciation among pre-K through 12th-grade teachers and their students. In FY 2018, the National AITC curriculum website (agclassroom.org) had over 336,000 visitors (a 26% increase over the previous year) who accessed 405 standards-based lesson plans and 785 companion resources. Over 1 million teachers and 7 million students were reached through direct contact through AITC staff and volunteers in FY 2017. (HH) Air Force Personal Financial Readiness Program Evaluation Development Funding available was $454,545. (II) Substance Abuse Program at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas The actual funding for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 was $296,933. (JJ) National Food and Agricultural Sciences Teaching, Extension, and Research Awards (aka Food and Agriculture Service Learning Program, TEACH, TERA and TA) For Fiscal Year 2018, no funds were appropriated to support the TEACH Program. The program ran on a no-cost extension. In FY 2017 the program was funded as a sole-source cooperative agreement. (KK) Youth Support and Internship Program No action is required for this Program, which was funded in Fiscal Year 2019. This program was not established in FY 18. (LL) Military REACH The actual funding for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 was $600,000. (MM) Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program Curriculum Development & Metrics The actual funding for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 was $540,000. (NN) Clearinghouse for Military Family Readiness The actual funding for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 was $2,395,456. The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (F) Pest Management NOTE: Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education - Professional Development (aka SARE-PD and SARE Chapter 3 Program); NOTE: SARE Chapters 1 & 3 were combined in FY 2014. See CFDA # 10.215. (S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development Grants Program and RYD); (X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (IPM-CS); Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act; and (AA) Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY).
Fiscal Year 2019 Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 – ACTIVE Programs: (G), (H) & (W) – Farm Safety, Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification, and Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities (AgrAbility Project) NOTE: Programs were combined in FY 2012. In FY 2019, the AgrAbility and Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification (YFSEC) Programs received $4,424,475 combined to make awards. Of this amount, $300,000 was used to support three (3) YFSEC continuation awards. Reminder of the funding, was used to support AgrAbility projects. Of the funding available for the AgrAbility program in FY 2019 ($4,124,475), some $3,576,805 was used to meet funding obligations toward eighteen (18) continuation State and Regional AgrAbility (SRAPs) and one (1) continuation National AgrAbility (NAP). Remainder of the funding, $547,670, was made available for new awards. FY 2019 RFA for new SRAPs was released in March 2019. NIFA received eight (8) proposals of which six (6) were eligible for funding consideration. NIFA was able to fund top three (3) proposals. The funding ratio was 50%. The new awards are expected to be announced in August, 2019. (I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE) In Fiscal Year (FY) 2019, NIFA competed NTAE funding in the amount of $1,488,000 and will issue a single 4-year continuation award. (DD) Healthy Homes Partnership One (1) award for $450,000 is anticipated to be provided to a Coordinating Institution that will administer sub awards to at least 18 state-level participating land-grant universities. This project is a continuation of the work established in the prior fiscal year. (GG) Agriculture in the Classroom (AITC) In FY 2019, USDA-NIFA will provide $529,920 to support Agriculture in the Classroom. Anticipate increases to the number of free curriculum resources nationally available in FY 2019. Anticipate maintenance of number of students and teacher directly contacted through AITC with program to enhance capacity to teach agricultural literacy. Anticipate maintenance of the number of students directly contacted through AITC. (HH) Air Force Personal Financial Readiness Program Evaluation Development Program did not received funding in FY 19. (II) Substance Abuse Program at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas The actual funding that will be awarded in FY 2019 is $302,793. (JJ) National Food and Agricultural Sciences Teaching, Extension, and Research Awards (aka Food and Agriculture Service Learning Program, TEACH, TERA and TA) For Fiscal Year 2019, $100,000 was available for the National Teaching Awards Program, The purpose of TERA award is to recognize and promote excellence in teaching in the food and agricultural sciences within U.S. colleges and universities. For the purposes of this RFA, teaching is defined to include all aspects of developing human capital in order to help meet current and future national food, agricultural, natural resources, and human sciences (FANH) workplace needs. The project grantee supports the selection and recognition of award recipients at the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU) Winter Meeting in consultation with NIFA. (KK) Youth Support and Internship Program Available funding was $900,000. (LL) Military REACH The actual funding that will be awarded in FY 2019 is $700,000. (MM) Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program Curriculum Development & Metrics The actual funding that will be awarded in FY 2019 is $585,000. (NN) Clearinghouse for Military Family Readiness The actual funding that will be awarded in FY 2019 is $5,357,583. The following list represents FY 2019 newly created CFDA numbers, which was part of an initiative to break out the separate programs formerly contained in CFDA # 10.500. Please see the FY 2019 Reference for pertinent details. FY ’18 Ref FY ’19 Ref Program Title 10.500 (A) 10.511 (A) (Joint) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (1862 LGIs) (Capacity Grant Program) 10.500 (B) 10.511 (B) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Smith-Lever Special Needs) (Capacity Grant Program) 10.500 (C) 10.511 (C) Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program (aka SLSNCGP) 10.500 (CC) 10.511 (D) (Joint) University of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) 10.500 (D) 10.512 Agriculture Extension at 1890 Land-grant Institutions (1890 LGIs-Section 1444) 10.500 (Q) 10.513 1890 Facilities Grants Program (1890 FGP) 10.500 (E) 10.514 Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) 10.500 (N) and 10.500 (O) 10.515 Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF) 10.500 (P) 10.516 Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program (RHSE) 10.500 (M) 10.517 (A) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions Program (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and TCEP) 10.500 (BB) 10.517 (B) Tribal Colleges Extension - Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) 10.500 (L) 10.517 (C) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP) 10.500 (R) 10.518 Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) 10.500 (T) 10.520 Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnerships Competitive Grants Program (ARME and RME) 10.500 (J) 10.521 (A) Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (aka CYFAR) 10.500 (U) 10.521 (B) Sustainable Community Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP); 10.500 (V) 10.521 (C) Professional and Development and Technical Assistance (aka CYFAR-PDTA) 10.500 (FF) 10.521 (D) Military Partnerships The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (F) Pest Management NOTE: Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education - Professional Development (aka SARE-PD and SARE Chapter 3 Program); NOTE: SARE Chapters 1 & 3 were combined in FY 2014. See CFDA # 10.215. (S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development Grants Program and RYD); (X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (IPM-CS); Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act; and (AA) Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY).
Fiscal Year 2020 Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 – ACTIVE Programs: (G), (H) & (W) – Farm Safety, Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification, and Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities (AgrAbility Project) NOTE: Programs were combined in FY 2012. The FY 2020 funding levels have not yet been established by Congressional Appropriations. Pertinent details will be provided by Farm Safety Program at a future date. (I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE) This program is subject to congressional budget approval for FY 2020. Should funding provided and based upon successful project performance, it is anticipated that continuation funding in the amount of $1,488,000 will be awarded. (DD) Healthy Homes Partnership Continuation of this project will be contingent upon availability of funding through the Interagency Agreement of USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) with Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes or another source of funding. Pertinent details will be provided by Program at a future date. GG) Agriculture in the Classroom (AITC) The FY 2020 funding levels have not yet been established by Congressional Appropriations. If this Program is funded in FY 2020, it is anticipated that the funding level and types of projects will be similar. Anticipate increases to the number of free curriculum resources nationally available in FY 2020. Anticipate maintenance of number of students and teacher directly contacted through AITC with program to enhance capacity to teach agricultural literacy. Anticipate maintenance of the number of students directly contacted through AITC. Pertinent details will be provided by Program at a future date. (HH) Air Force Personal Financial Readiness Program Evaluation Development Program will not receive funding in FY 20. (II) Substance Abuse Program at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas The FY 2020 funding levels have not yet been established by Congressional Appropriations. If this Program is funded in FY 2020, it is anticipated that the funding level and types of projects will be similar. Pertinent details will be provided by Program at a future date. (JJ) National Food and Agricultural Sciences Teaching, Extension, and Research Awards (aka Food and Agriculture Service Learning Program, TEACH, TERA and TA) The FY 2020 funding level is of $100,000. This will be year 2 of a four-year continuation award. However, for Fiscal Year (FY) 2020, it is projected that approximately $100,000 will be appropriated to support one project. A total of 40 award nominations are expected for the Regional and National Teaching Awards. There will be no new projects. (KK) Youth Support and Internship Program Anticipated funding is $900,000 (LL) Military REACH The FY 2020 funding levels have not yet been established by Congressional Appropriations. If this Program is funded in FY 2020, it is anticipated that the funding level and types of projects will be similar. Pertinent details will be provided by Program at a future date. (MM) Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program Curriculum Development & Metrics The FY 2020 funding levels have not yet been established by Congressional Appropriations. If this Program is funded in FY 2020, it is anticipated that the funding level and types of projects will be similar. Pertinent details will be provided by Program at a future date. (NN) Clearinghouse for Military Family Readiness The FY 2020 funding levels have not yet been established by Congressional Appropriations. If this Program is funded in FY 2020, it is anticipated that the funding level and types of projects will be similar. Pertinent details will be provided by Program at a future date. The following list represents CFDA numbers created FY 2019, as part of the initiative to break out the separate programs formerly contained in CFDA # 10.500. Please see the FY 2020 Reference for pertinent details. FY ’20 Ref Program Title 10.511 (A) (Joint) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (1862 LGIs) (Capacity Grant Program) 10.511 (B) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Smith-Lever Special Needs) (Capacity Grant Program) 10.511 (C) Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program (aka SLSNCGP) 10.511 (D) (Joint) University of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) 10.512 Agriculture Extension at 1890 Land-grant Institutions (1890 LGIs-Section 1444) 10.513 1890 Facilities Grants Program (1890 FGP) 10.514 Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) 10.515 Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF) 10.516 Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program (RHSE) 10.517 (A) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions Program (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and TCEP) 10.517 (B) Tribal Colleges Extension - Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) 10.517 (C) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP) 10.518 Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) 10.520 Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnerships Competitive Grants Program (ARME and RME) 10.521 (A) Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (aka CYFAR) 10.521 (B) Sustainable Community Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP); 10.521 (C) Professional and Development and Technical Assistance (aka CYFAR-PDTA) 10.521 (D) Military Partnerships The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (F) Pest Management NOTE: Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education - Professional Development (aka SARE-PD and SARE Chapter 3 Program) NOTE: SARE Chapters 1 & 3 were combined in FY 2014. See CFDA # 10.215. (S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development Grants Program and RYD) (X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (IPM-CS) Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act and (AA) Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY).
Authorization
SPECIAL NOTES: (1) Numerous Programs are funded under CFDA 10.500. Most of the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) grants were issued under the general authority of the Secretary of Agriculture, pursuant to 7 U.S.C. 343 (d) (2) Listed below are several programs, which are indicative of the types of projects currently funded under CFDA 10.500. However, please be advised that the listing is NOT exhaustive. 1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c): (a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (aka 3b & c Capacity Grants - formerly known as Formula Funds) Sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act provide funding for agricultural extension programs at 1862 Land-grant universities. (b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) Sections 3(b)(1) and 8 of the Smith-Lever Act provide the basis of funding special needs agricultural extension programs at 1862 Land-grant institutions. (c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program Section 7129 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA), re-authorizes Section 3(b) & (c) of the Smith–Lever Act, allowing the Secretary of Agriculture, acting through the Director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), to conduct competitive grant programs to State Extension Services at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions to support innovative, education-based approaches to addressing emergency preparedness and specific responses related to natural and man-made disasters. (d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement) Funds available for distribution under the Smith-Lever Act, Section 3(b) and (c), statutory formula. (e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement) Federal funds are available for distribution under the Smith-Lever Act, Section 3(b) and (c), statutory formula. (f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC Sections 208 of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act provides, in pertinent part, that “In the administration of … the Act of August 30,1890 (7 U.S.C. 321-326, 328) (known as the Second Morrill Act), … the University [of the District of Columbia] shall be considered to be a university established for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts in accordance with the provisions of the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301-305, 307, 308) (known as the First Morrill Act); and the term "State", is used in the laws and provisions of law listed in the preceding, paragraphs of this section shall include the District of Columbia. … In the administration of the Act of May 8, 1914 (7 U.S.C. 341-346, 347a-349) (known as the Smith-Lever Act) … the University [of the District of Columbia] shall be considered to be a university established for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts in accordance with the provisions of the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301- 305, 307,308); and … the term "State" as used in such Act of May 8, 1949, shall include the District of Columbia, except that the District of Columbia shall not be eligible to receive any sums appropriated under section 3 of such Act. … In lieu of an authorization of appropriations for the District of Columbia under section 3 of such Act of May 8, 1914, there is authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary to provide cooperative agricultural extension work in the District of Columbia under such Act. Any reference in such Act (other than section 3 thereof) to funds appropriated under such Act shall in the case of the District of Columbia be considered a reference to funds appropriated under this subsection.” Therefore, this grant funds the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending the University of the District of Columbia, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects. Section 7417 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-234) amended section 208 of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act to eliminate any matching requirement for the extension formula funds provided to the University of the District of Columbia, effective October 1, 2008. 2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and (newly designated) Central State University (Section 1444) (7 U.S.C. 3221) Section 1444 of the National Agricultural Research,, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act Of 1977 (NARETPA), enacted as Title XIV of Public Law 95–113 (The Food and Agriculture Act of 1977) on Sept. 29, 1977, is also known as the Section 1444 Program. This law provides the basis for Federal funding for agricultural extension activities at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and Central State University. 3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d): (a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education) Section 3(d) of the Smith-Lever Act provides that the Secretary of Agriculture may fund extension work in the several States, Territories, and possessions. Section 1425 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (as amended) (7 U.S.C. 3175) provides the statutory formula for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). This program supports Federal funding for extension activities associated with disseminating the results of food and nutrition research performed or funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to enable low-income individuals and families to engage in nutritionally sound food purchase and preparation practices. Funding extends to EFNEP at State land-grant colleges established under the Morrill Act of July 2, 1862, as amended, and the Morrill Act of August 30, 1890, as amended, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University. Section 7116 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) amended Section 1425 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3175) to accomplish various goals as indicated in Part I.A. of the Capacity Grant Request for Application (Capacity RFA). (b) Youth at Risk Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life Represents a new program: Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (d) Farm Safety See 7 U.S.C. 343 (d). Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (e) New Technologies at Ag Extension See 7 U.S.c. 343 (d). Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (f) Pest Management Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD) Effective FY 2014 this Program was consolidated under Research. See CFDA 10.215 for pertinent details. (h) Federally Recognized Tribes See 7 U.S.C. 343 (d). Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification See 7 U.S.C. 343 (d). Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (j) EIPM Support Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (k) EIPM Coordination Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. 4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES: (a) Renewable Resources Extension Act The Renewable Resources Extension Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-306, 92 Stat. 349, 16 U.S.C. 1671 et seq.) provides for an expanded and comprehensive extension program for forest and rangeland renewable resources. The majority of the appropriated funds are distributed to eligible institutions based on a formula that considers the geographic extent, ecosystem productivity, economic contribution, and population for each state. Since FY 2002, a small amount of these funds have been used to fund National Focus Fund Projects which have served to expand comprehensive extension programs for forest and rangeland renewable resources on a national, regional, or multi-institutional scale through better program coordination, innovative technologies, and extension models that can be easily duplicated. (b) Rural Health and Safety The authority for this program is under Section 502 (i) of Title V of the Rural Development Act of 1972, as amended (7 U.S.C. 2662). The Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 (Pub. L. 111-8) appropriates funds under Division A, Title I. The Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Program addresses the Individual and Family Health Education component of the authorization. (c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions This program is authorized under Section 534(b) of the Equity in Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 201 note), as amended by the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) (7 U.S.C. 7601). This section amends Section 3 of the Act of May 8, 1914 (Smith-Lever Act) (7 U.S.C. 341 et seq.), as amended. Under this authority, appropriated funds are to be awarded to the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions (hereinafter referred to as 1994 institutions) for Extension work and funds are to be distributed on the basis of a competitive application process. (d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions Title IV of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7630) authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to make grants to the Girl Scouts of the United States of America (GSUSA), the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), the National 4-H Council (4-H Council), and the National FFA Organization (FFA). Section 7309 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act (FCEA) of 2008 reauthorized 7 U.S.C. 7630, which was also amended to provide additional flexibility in content delivery to each organization receiving funds and to allow recipients to redistribute all or part of the funds to individual councils or local chapters without further need of approval from the Secretary. In FY 2009, Terms and Conditions of these awards should facilitate the redistribution without further need of approval. The Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 (Pub. L. 111-8) appropriates funds under Division A, Title I “for grants to youth organizations pursuant to 7 U.S.C. 7630.” (e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) Title VI Section 604 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7642) states that -The Secretary of Agriculture shall continue operation of the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database program (referred to in this section as the “FARAD program”) through contracts, grants, or cooperative agreements with appropriate colleges or universities. (f) Federal Administration DIRECT APPROPRIATION Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447) Pursuant to the authority contained in Section 1447 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (NARETPA) [7 U.S.C. 3222b], and reauthorized by Section 7123 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) (Pub. L. 110-246) grants will be awarded under the Facilities Grants Program to the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University. The Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 appropriates funds under Division A, Title I. (h) Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnership Grants Program (aka ARPA and RME): Section 133 of the Agricultural Risk Protection Act of 2000 (ARPA), (Pub. L. 106-224), amended the Federal Crop Insurance Act to add section 524(a)(3); [7 U.S.C. Section 1501 as amended by section 132(a) and section 524]; which requires the Secretary, acting through the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), to establish a competitive grants program for the purpose of educating agricultural producers about the full range of risk management activities. Section 524(a) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act, 7 U.S.C. 1524(a) was further amended by Section 12026 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008, (FCEA)( Pub. L. 110-246), which requires that the Secretary place special emphasis on risk management strategies, education, and specifically targeted outreach., 7 U.S.C. 341-349
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive, Non-Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. 1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c): (a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions 3b & c Capacity (formerly known as "formula") Grants: Applications may be submitted by the following 1862 Land-grant Institutions: Auburn University, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, American Samoa Community College, University of Arizona, University of Arkansas, University of California, Colorado State University, University of Connecticut, University of Delaware, University of Florida, University of Georgia, University of Guam, University of Hawaii, University of Idaho, University of Illinois, Purdue University, Iowa State University, Kansas State University, University of Kentucky, Louisiana State University, University of Maine, University of Maryland-College Park, University of Massachusetts, Michigan State University, College of Micronesia, University of Minnesota, Mississippi State University, University of Missouri, Montana State University, University of Nebraska, University of Nevada-Reno, University of New Hampshire, Rutgers University, New Mexico State University, Cornell University, North Carolina State University, North Dakota State University, Northern Marianas College, Ohio State University, Oklahoma State University, Oregon State University, Pennsylvania State University, University of Puerto Rico, University of Rhode Island, Clemson University, South Dakota State University, University of Tennessee, Texas A & M University, Utah State University, University of Vermont, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, University of the Virgin Islands, Washington State University, West Virginia University, University of Wisconsin, and University of Wyoming. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project. (b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) : Applications may be submitted by the following 1862 Land-grant Institutions: University of Alaska-Fairbanks, University of Arizona, Colorado State University, University of Idaho, Kansas State University, Montana State University, University of Nebraska, University of Nevada-Reno, New Mexico State University, North Dakota State University, Oregon State University, South Dakota State University, Texas A & M University, Utah State University, University of Vermont, and University of Wyoming. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project. (c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program Applications may be submitted with the approval of Extension Directors of 1862 Land-grant Institutions in the 50 states, American Samoa, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Marianas, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project. An applicant's failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the time of an application deadline will result in NIFA not accepting the application or, even though an application may be reviewed, will preclude NIFA from making an award. (d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement): This program is no longer funded by NIFA. The deadline for the FY 2015 Request for Applications (RFA) was October 15, 2014. (e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement): This program is no longer funded by NIFA. The deadline for the FY 2016 RFA was July 20, 2015. (f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC The University of the District of Columbia, as the 1862 Land-Grant Institution, is the only applicant eligible for funding under the DCPPERA. The award recipient may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project. 2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444): A. Eligible Applicants: Applications may be submitted by 1890 Land-Grant Universities, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, that conduct agricultural extension activities in accordance with NARETPA section 1444(a)(1): Alabama A&M University; Tuskegee University; University of Arkansas - Pine Bluff; Delaware State University; Florida A&M University; Fort Valley State University; Kentucky State University; Southern University; University of Maryland - Eastern Shore; Alcorn State University; Lincoln University; North Carolina A & T State University; Langston University; South Carolina State University; Tennessee State University; Prairie View A&M University; Virginia State University; and West Virginia State University. Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution. Institutions may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project or activity. 3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d): (a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education): Applications may be submitted by State colleges and universities in accordance with Section 3(d) of the Smith-Lever Act: Auburn University; Alabama A & M University; Tuskegee University; University of Alaska; American Samoa Community College; University of Arizona; University of Arkansas; University of Arkansas - Pine Bluff; University of California; Colorado State University; University of Connecticut; University of Delaware; Delaware State University; University of the District of Columbia; University of Florida; Florida A & M University; University of Georgia; Fort Valley State University; University of Guam; University of Hawaii; University of Idaho; University of Illinois; Purdue University; Iowa State University; Kansas State University; University of Kentucky; Kentucky State University; Louisiana State University; Southern University; University of Maine; University of Maryland (College Park); University of Maryland (Eastern Shore); University of Massachusetts; Michigan State University; College of Micronesia; University of Minnesota; Mississippi State University; Alcorn State University; University of Missouri; Lincoln University; Montana State University; University of Nebraska; University of Nevada; University of New Hampshire; Rutgers University; New Mexico State University; Cornell University; North Carolina State University; North Carolina A & T University; North Dakota State University; Northern Marianas College; Ohio State University; Oklahoma State University; Langston University; Oregon State University; Pennsylvania State University; University of Puerto Rico; University of Rhode Island; Clemson University; South Carolina State University; South Dakota State University; University of Tennessee; Tennessee State University; Texas A&M University; Prairie View A & M University; Utah State University; University of Vermont; University of the Virgin Islands; Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Virginia State University; Washington State University; West Virginia University; West Virginia State University; University of Wisconsin; and University of Wyoming. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply for funding provided that such arrangements are necessary to complete the project. (b) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (d) Farm Safety NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated: o Youth Farm Safety; o Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and o Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project. Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (e) New Technologies at Ag Extension Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (f) Pest Management Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD) NOTES: (1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account. (2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details. (h) Federally Recognized Tribes Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated: o Youth Farm Safety; o Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and o Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project. Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (j) EIPM Support Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (k) EIPM Coordination Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. 4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES: (a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA) Applications may be submitted by 1862 and 1890 land-grant institutions. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project. An applicant's failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the time of an application deadline will preclude NIFA from making an award. (b) Rural Health and Safety (RHSE) Land-grant colleges and universities that are eligible to receive funds under the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301 et seq.), and the Act of August 30, 1890 (7 U.S.C. 321 et seq.), including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and the University of the District of Columbia. Applications may be submitted by any of the Tribal colleges and universities designated as 1994 Land-Grant Institutions under the Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994, as amended. Award recipients may subward to other organizations provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project. Failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the application deadline will disqualify an applicant from consideration and will result in NIFA returning the application without review or, even though an application may be reviewed, will preclude NIFA from reviewing the application and making an award. (c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions Applications may be submitted by any of the Tribal colleges and universities designated as 1994 Land-Grant Institutions under the Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994, as amended. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of project goals and objectives. An applicant's failure to meet an eligibility criterion by the time of an application deadline will result in NIFA returning the application without review or, even though an application may be reviewed, will preclude NIFA from making an award. (d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (RYD) Pursuant to 7 U.S.C. Section 7630, only the Girl Scouts of the United States of America, the National 4-H Council, the Boy Scouts of America, and the National FFA Organization are eligible to apply. NIFA will accept only one application from each organization. The application must be developed and submitted by the national office of each respective organization. Rural Youth Development awards will be distributed to each of the four (4) eligible organizations that submits an application in accordance with RFA requirements, if the application is found to be worthy of support through the peer review process. The amount awarded to each organization will be determined based on review and recommendations of a peer review panel. Award recipients may subcontract to organizations not eligible to apply provided such organizations are necessary for the conduct of the project. If an applicant fails to meet an eligibility criterion by the time of the application deadline, the application will be at risk of being excluded from NIFA review and will preclude NIFA from making an award. (e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) The Secretary shall offer to enter into a contract, grant, or cooperative agreement with 1 or more appropriate colleges and universities to operate the FARAD program. (f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION) Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447) Eligible applicants under this RFA are the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University. They are: Alabama A&M University, Tuskegee University, University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff, Delaware State University, Florida A&M University, Fort Valley State University, Kentucky State University, Southern University, University of Maryland-Eastern Shore, Lincoln University, Alcorn State University, North Carolina A&T State University, Langston University, South Carolina State University, Tennessee State University, Prairie View A&M University, Virginia State University, and West Virginia State University. Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.
Beneficiary Eligibility
Extension Programs at the State and county level are available to the general public.
Credentials/Documentation
The System for Award Management (SAM) combines eight federal procurement systems, including CCR, and the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance into one new system. CCR activities are conducted through SAM (the CCR website will redirect users to SAM). Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM): Each applicant (unless excepted under 2 CFR SS 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal awarding agency under 2 CFR SS 25.110(d)) is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) Provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal awarding agency. It also must state that the Federal awarding agency may not make a Federal award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Federal awarding agency is ready to make a Federal award, the Federal awarding agency may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a Federal award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. Applicants must furnish the information required in the Request for Applications (RFAs). Successful applicants recommended for funding must furnish the information and assurances requested during the award documentation process. These include, but are not limited to the following: Organizational Management Information - Specific management information relating to an applicant shall be submitted on a one time basis, with updates on an as needed basis, as part of the responsibility determination prior to the award of a grant identified under this RFA, if such information has not been provided previously under this or another NIFA program. NIFA will provide copies of forms recommended for use in fulfilling these requirements as part of the preaward process. Although an applicant may be eligible based on its status as one of these entities, there are factors which may exclude an applicant from receiving Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits under this program (e.g., debarment or suspension of an individual involved or a determination that an applicant is not responsible based on submitted organizational management information). This information collection is approved under OMB Circular Control No. 0524-0026, "Assurance of Compliance with the Department of Agriculture Regulations Assuring Civil Rights, Compliance and Organization Information." SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: JOINT PROGRAM: Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-capacity-grant Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions - (Special Needs) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resources/FY18-CES-SLSN-Modification-882017.pdf Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-sections-3b-and-3c-special-needs-capacity-grant 1890 LGI's and Tuskegee, West Virginia & Central State: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/agricultural-extension-programs-1890-institutions Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/fy2017-efnep-rfa https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-webneers Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/youth-farm-safety-education-and-certification-program New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE) https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (CYFAR); Sustainable Community Projects (CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development Technology Assistance (CYFAR-PDTA): Sustainable Community Projects (SCP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects Military: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-military https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/cyfar-4-h-military-partnership-professional-development-and-technical-assistance Professional and Technical Assistance (PDTA): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-professional-development-and-technical Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program) (TCEP) and Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se Renewable Resources Extension Act Program - (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/renewable-resources-extension-act-capacity-grant https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse 1890 Facilities Grant Program (and Renewals): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) http://www.farad.org/ Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities Healthy Homes Partnership: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/healthy-homes-partnership RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
Preapplication coordination is required. An environmental impact statement is required for this listing. An environmental impact assessment is not required for this listing. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive, Non-Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. All RFAs are published on the Agency’s website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. his program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372. GENERAL PERTINENT DETAILS: 1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c): (a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [(aka 3b & c Capacity Funds), formerly known as "Formula" funds)] Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to the Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. As noted in the Capacity Request for Applications (Capacity RFA), these application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements. Section 202 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require approved plans of work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1862 Land-grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1862 Land-grant Institution must submit both a 5-Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted each year as an update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due by April 1. (b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) : Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to Special Needs Program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. As noted in the Capacity Request for Applications (Capacity RFA), these application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements. Section 202 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require approved plans of work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1862 Land-grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1862 Land-grant Institution must submit both a 5-Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted each year as an update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due by April 1. (c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program : Pertinent info to be determined at a later date. (d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement): This program is no longer funded by NIFA. The deadline for the FY 2015 Request for Applications (RFA) was October 15, 2014. (e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement): This program is no longer funded by NIFA. The deadline for the FY 2016 RFA was July 20, 2015. (f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC: Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to the DCPPERA program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. As noted in the Capacity Request for Applications (Capacity RFA), these application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements. Section 105 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended the Smith-Lever Act and the Hatch Act to require an approved Plan of Work for extension and research activities at 1862 Land-grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. As stated in the Preface to the Federal Register Notice at 71 FR 4107, “Although the District of Columbia receives extension funds under the District of Columbia Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act, Public Law 93–471, as opposed to the Smith-Lever Act, NIFA has determined that it should be subject to the POW requirements imposed under these guidelines except where expressly excluded.” Therefore, the University of the District of Columbia must submit both a 5-Year Plan of Work Update (i.e., submitted as an annual update) and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports were due April 1. 2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444): Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to the Section 1444 Program as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. These application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system, and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements. Section 225 of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) amended NARETPA to require an approved Plan of Work for agricultural extension and research activities at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions in order to receive Federal funding. Therefore, each 1890 land-grant institution, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, must submit both a 5-Year Plan of Work Update and an Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. Both reports are due April 1. Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution. 3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d): (a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education): No Standard Form (SF) 424-A, Budget Information for Non-Construction Programs, and no Budget Narrative Attachment Form are required for either the initial or the final submissions. However, the EFNEP-specific forms will be required. Pre-award form submissions must be submitted to EFNEP as a “new” application on the www.grants.gov website. The SF-424M Application Package should include: Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form (SF) 424M (Mandatory) NIFA Supplemental Information Form Key Contacts Form (b) Youth at Risk (CYFAR): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (d) Farm Safety: NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined: • Farm Safety; • Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and • Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project. Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (e) New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. (f) Pest Management: Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD) NOTE: Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account. See CFDA Number 10.215 for pertinent details. (h) Federally Recognized Tribes: Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification: NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined: • Farm Safety; • Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and • Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project. Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (j) EIPM Support: Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (k) EIPM Coordination: Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . 4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES: (a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA): Application packages complement, rather than duplicate, the information collected via the Plan of Work (POW) system and the Research, Extension, and Education Project Online Reporting Tool (REEport), and together satisfy all legislative and regulatory pre-award requirements. Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (b) Rural Health and Safety (RHSE): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions: Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (RYD): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447): In accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution. Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. .
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) only accepts electronic applications which are submitted via Grants.gov in response to specific Requests for Applications (RFA). Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. For information about the pre-award phase of the grant lifecycle application processes see: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/learn-grants/grants-101/pre-award-phase.html. Further, applicants must follow the instructions provided in the NIFA Grants.gov Application Guide, which can be assessed as follows: Adobe NIFA Applications. 2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA's Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: JOINT PROGRAM: Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-capacity-grant Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions - (Special Needs) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resources/FY18-CES-SLSN-Modification-882017.pdf Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-sections-3b-and-3c-special-needs-capacity-grant 1890 LGI's and Tuskegee, West Virginia & Central State: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/agricultural-extension-programs-1890-institutions Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/fy2017-efnep-rfa https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-webneers Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/youth-farm-safety-education-and-certification-program New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE) https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (CYFAR); Sustainable Community Projects (CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development Technology Assistance (CYFAR-PDTA): Sustainable Community Projects (SCP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects Military: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-military https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/cyfar-4-h-military-partnership-professional-development-and-technical-assistance Professional and Technical Assistance (PDTA): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-professional-development-and-technical Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program) (TCEP) and Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se Renewable Resources Extension Act Program - (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/renewable-resources-extension-act-capacity-grant https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse 1890 Facilities Grant Program (and Renewals): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) http://www.farad.org/ Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities Healthy Homes Partnership: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/healthy-homes-partnership RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Award Procedure
Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA. Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application. Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the Competitive Request for Applications (RFA). 2 CFR 200 - Subpart C and Appendix I and 2 CFR part 400 apply to this Program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: JOINT PROGRAM: Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-capacity-grant Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions - (Special Needs) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resources/FY18-CES-SLSN-Modification-882017.pdf Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-sections-3b-and-3c-special-needs-capacity-grant 1890 LGI's and Tuskegee, West Virginia & Central State: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/agricultural-extension-programs-1890-institutions Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/fy2017-efnep-rfa https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-webneers Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/youth-farm-safety-education-and-certification-program New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE) https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (CYFAR); Sustainable Community Projects (CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development Technology Assistance (CYFAR-PDTA): Sustainable Community Projects (SCP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects Military: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-military https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/cyfar-4-h-military-partnership-professional-development-and-technical-assistance Professional and Technical Assistance (PDTA): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-professional-development-and-technical Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program) (TCEP) and Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se Renewable Resources Extension Act Program - (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/renewable-resources-extension-act-capacity-grant https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse 1890 Facilities Grant Program (and Renewals): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) http://www.farad.org/ Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities Healthy Homes Partnership: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/healthy-homes-partnership RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional location, as appropriate for application deadlines
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
From 30 to 60 days. Contact the National Program Leader (NPL), as indicated per CFDA Section # 152 - Headquarters Office regarding dates for specific deadlines, start and end dates, and range of approval/disapproval time. Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. NIFA's respective links regarding general information are provided below: http://nifa.usda.gov/ http://www.grants.gov. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFA is available as follows: JOINT PROGRAM: Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-capacity-grant Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions - (Special Needs) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resources/FY18-CES-SLSN-Modification-882017.pdf Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-sections-3b-and-3c-special-needs-capacity-grant 1890 LGI's and Tuskegee, West Virginia & Central State: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/agricultural-extension-programs-1890-institutions Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/fy2017-efnep-rfa https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-webneers Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/youth-farm-safety-education-and-certification-program New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE) https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (CYFAR); Sustainable Community Projects (CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development Technology Assistance (CYFAR-PDTA): Sustainable Community Projects (SCP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects Military: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-military https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/cyfar-4-h-military-partnership-professional-development-and-technical-assistance Professional and Technical Assistance (PDTA): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-professional-development-and-technical Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program) (TCEP) and Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se Renewable Resources Extension Act Program - (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/renewable-resources-extension-act-capacity-grant https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse 1890 Facilities Grant Program (and Renewals): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) http://www.farad.org/ Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities Healthy Homes Partnership: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/healthy-homes-partnership RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Appeals
Not Applicable. 2 CFR Part 200 - Subparts D & E apply to this program.
Renewals
Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA), which are generally published annually. The most current RFA is available as follows: JOINT PROGRAM: Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-capacity-grant Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions - (Special Needs) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resources/FY18-CES-SLSN-Modification-882017.pdf Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-sections-3b-and-3c-special-needs-capacity-grant 1890 LGI's and Tuskegee, West Virginia & Central State: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/agricultural-extension-programs-1890-institutions Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/fy2017-efnep-rfa https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-webneers Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/youth-farm-safety-education-and-certification-program New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE) https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (CYFAR); Sustainable Community Projects (CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development Technology Assistance (CYFAR-PDTA): Sustainable Community Projects (SCP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects Military: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-military https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/cyfar-4-h-military-partnership-professional-development-and-technical-assistance Professional and Technical Assistance (PDTA): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-professional-development-and-technical Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program) (TCEP) and Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se Renewable Resources Extension Act Program - (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/renewable-resources-extension-act-capacity-grant https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse 1890 Facilities Grant Program (and Renewals): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) http://www.farad.org/ Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities Healthy Homes Partnership: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/healthy-homes-partnership RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
How are proposals selected?
2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA's Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFAs are available as follows: JOINT PROGRAM: Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-capacity-grant Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions - (Special Needs) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resources/FY18-CES-SLSN-Modification-882017.pdf Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-sections-3b-and-3c-special-needs-capacity-grant 1890 LGI's and Tuskegee, West Virginia & Central State: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/agricultural-extension-programs-1890-institutions Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/fy2017-efnep-rfa https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-webneers Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/youth-farm-safety-education-and-certification-program New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE) https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (CYFAR); Sustainable Community Projects (CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development Technology Assistance (CYFAR-PDTA): Sustainable Community Projects (SCP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects Military: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-military https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/cyfar-4-h-military-partnership-professional-development-and-technical-assistance Professional and Technical Assistance (PDTA): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-professional-development-and-technical Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program) (TCEP) and Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se Renewable Resources Extension Act Program - (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/renewable-resources-extension-act-capacity-grant https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse 1890 Facilities Grant Program (and Renewals): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) http://www.farad.org/ Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities Healthy Homes Partnership: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/healthy-homes-partnership RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
How may assistance be used?
Section # 070 – USES ONLY (SEE BELOW FOR RESTRICTIONS) SPECIAL NOTES: (1) The majority of Cooperative Extension Service (CES) Programs are issued under the general authority of the Secretary of Agriculture [7 U.S.C. 343 (d)]. A synopsis of general uses is provided in the CFDA database. (2) Please refer to the Competitive, Non-Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. (3) Although the information provided in the CFDA database is not exhaustive, NIFA attempts to also indicate “Exceptions” to the general uses. GENERAL STATEMENTS REGARDING USES: Grant funds must be used for allowable costs necessary to conduct approved integrated research, extension and education objectives to address food and agricultural sciences, in the broadest sense. NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities. DETAILED INFORMATION – USES ONLY 1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c): (a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (formerly known as 3b & c Formula Funds): Sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act provide funding for agricultural extension programs at 1862 Land-grant universities. These funds are used by institutions eligible to receive funds under the Act of Congress approved as “1862 Land-grant Institutions”, for the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending or resident in 1862 Land-grant Institutions in the several communities, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects. (b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) : These funds are used to support extension activities identified in the eligible institution’s approved 5-Year Plan of Work. Special Needs funds are allocated to a State Cooperative Extension Service (CES) to fulfill a purpose or overcome a condition peculiar to the State, as compared to the country as a whole, or for a purpose not normally a part of the continuing extension program. Funds are allocated under this program to a State CES to fulfill a purpose or overcome a condition peculiar to the State, as compared to the country as a whole, or for a purpose not normally a part of the continuing extension program. (c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program : There has been an increase in public awareness regarding the number and severity of disaster type critical incidents involving earthquakes, tsunamis, tornadoes, wildfire, drought, contagious disease, and terrorist events. Within the states and territories, the CES has repeatedly served as the trusted community organization that has helped to enable families, communities, and businesses to successfully prepare for, respond to and cope with disaster losses and critical incidents. The Extension Special Needs RFA encourages proposals that specifically address one or more of the key target areas. Fundable projects should support education and extension activities which: 1. Reduce risk through planning, disaster preparedness and emergency response by improving communication between the public, community leaders, state and Federal agencies; 2. Develop strategies and educational materials and/or programming in the area of emergency planning, infrastructure design and disaster recovery operation; 3. Develop community networks that provide real-time disaster education information; and/or 4. Develop or expand educational materials regarding disaster issues suitable for use and distribution by the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN) or the eXtension Community of Practice working with disaster planning. (d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement): This program is no longer funded by NIFA. The deadline for the FY 2015 Request for Applications (RFA) was October 15, 2014. (e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement): This program is no longer funded by NIFA. The deadline for the FY 2016 RFA was July 20, 2015. (f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC: These funds are used by the University of the District of Columbia for the development of practical applications of research knowledge and giving of instruction and practical demonstrations of existing or improved practices or technologies in agriculture, uses of solar energy with respect to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy, and subjects relating thereto to persons not attending the University of the District of Columbia, and imparting information on those subjects through demonstrations, publications, and otherwise and for the necessary printing and distribution of information in connection with the subjects. Sections 208 of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act provides further pertinent information. There is no matching requirement for the University of the District of Columbia. 2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and Central State University (Section 1444): Funds appropriated under this section shall be used for expenses of conducting extension programs and activities in accordance with 7 U.S.C. 331. No portion of the funds allocated under this grant will be applied, directly or indirectly, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or buildings, or the purchase or rental of land, or in college course teaching, lectures in college, or any other purpose not specified in NARETPA section 1444. Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution. 3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d): (a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education): Section 3(d) of the Smith-Lever Act provides that the Secretary of Agriculture may fund extension work in the several States, Territories, and possessions. Section 1425 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (as amended) (7 U.S.C. 3175) provides the statutory formula for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). This program supports Federal funding for extension activities associated with disseminating the results of food and nutrition research performed or funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to enable low-income individuals and families to engage in nutritionally sound food purchase and preparation practices. Funding extends to EFNEP at State land-grant colleges established under the Morrill Act of July 2, 1862, as amended, and the Morrill Act of August 30, 1890, as amended, including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and Central State University. (b) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (d) Farm Safety NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated: • Youth Farm Safety; • Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and • Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project. Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (e) New Technologies at Ag Extension) Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (f) Pest Management Program was consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD aka Chapter 1) NOTES: (1) Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account. (2) See CFDA Number 10.215 for all pertinent details. (h) Federally Recognized Tribes Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification NOTE: Effective FY 2012, the following programs were consolidated: • Youth Farm Safety; • Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification; and • Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project. Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (j) EIPM Support Program was consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (k) EIPM Coordination Program was consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). 4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES: (a) Renewable Resources Extension Act Renewable Resources Extension Act-National Focus Fund Projects provide for expanded and comprehensive extension programs for forest and rangeland renewable resources programs at a national, regional, or multi-institutional level. Since FY 2002, a small amount of these funds have been used to fund National Focus Fund Projects which have served to expand comprehensive extension programs for forest and rangeland renewable resources on a national, regional, or multi-institutional scale through better program coordination, innovative technologies, and extension models that can be easily duplicated. (b) Rural Health and Safety The Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program is designed to meet national goals for addressing the health and access needs of rural Americans. Rural Health and Safety Education Programs will focus on issues related to aging in one or more of three areas: 1) population aging in rural areas; 2) eldercare or caregiving and its impact on rural and farm families; and/or 3) related issues of rural health care to provide older individuals and families. (c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions The Tribal Colleges Extension Program (TCEP) provides funding for the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions to conduct non-formal education and outreach activities to help meet the needs of the Native American people. Appropriated funds are to be awarded to the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions for Extension work and funds are to be distributed on the basis of a competitive application process. (d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development or RYD Grants) This Program has not been funded for several years. (e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. f) Federal Administration: DIRECT APPROPRIATION - Extension Activities Pertinent details will be provided at a future date. (g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447) Facilities awards will be made for the acquisition and improvement of agricultural and food sciences facilities and equipment, including libraries, so that the 1890 land-grant institutions, including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University and Central State University may participate fully in the production of human capital in the food and agricultural sciences. Priorities for the eligible institutions are set in the facilities plan that is submitted to NIFA for review and approval. Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution. (h) Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnerships Grants Program (aka ARPA, ERME & RME): The Secretary, acting through NIFA, is required to establish a competitive grants program for the purpose of educating agricultural producers about the full range of risk management activities. These activities include futures, options, agricultural trade options, crop insurance, cash forward contracting, debt reduction, production diversification, marketing plans and tactics, farm resources risk reduction, and other appropriate risk management strategies. The Risk Management Education (RME) program brings the existing knowledge base to bear on risk management issues faced by agricultural producers and expands the program throughout the Nation on a regional and multi-regional basis.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
Performance Reports: PERFORMANCE MONITORING: See above for pertinent and specific details.
Auditing
Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.
Records
In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, SS 200.333 Retention requirements for records. Grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three (3) year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved. 2 CFR 200 Subpart D applies to this program.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
Statutory Formula: Title Various Various

Matching is voluntary. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive and/or Capacity Requests for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive and/or Capacity RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. 1. SMITH-LEVER 3(b) & (c): (a) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions [(aka 3b & c Capacity Grants (formerly known as "Formula" Funds)]: States are eligible for funds appropriated under this Act according to the following formula: Out of each annual allocation, each State will be entitled to receive a sum of money equal to the sums available from Federal cooperative extension funds for the fiscal year 1962, and subject to the same requirements as to furnishing of equivalent sums by the State, except that amounts heretofore made available to the Secretary for allotment on the basis of special needs shall continue available for use on the same basis. Further, the University of Guam and the University of the Virgin Islands will receive $100,000 each in addition to the sums appropriated for the several States of the United States and Puerto Rico under the provisions of sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act. Of the remainder so appropriated for each fiscal year 20 per cent will be paid to the several States in equal proportions, 40 per cent will be paid to the several States in the proportion that the rural population of each bears to the total rural population of the several States as determined by the census, and the balance will be paid to the several States in the proportion that the farm population of each bears to the total farm population of the several States as determined by the census. Any appropriation made under sections 3(b) and 3(c) of the Smith-Lever Act will be allotted in the first and succeeding years on the basis of the decennial census current at the time the appropriation is first made, and as to any increase, on the basis of decennial census current at the time such increase is first appropriated. Cost Sharing or Matching Section 3(e)(1) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. §343(e)(1)) states, with regard to institutions in the 50 states, “no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for cooperative extension work.” However, section 3(e)(4) of the Smith-Lever Act (U.S.C. §343(e)(4)) provides that “Effective beginning for fiscal year 2003, in lieu of the matching funds requirement of paragraph (1), the insular areas of [American Samoa,] the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, [Micronesia, the Northern Marians Islands,] and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than 50 percent of the formula funds distributed by the Secretary to each of the insular areas, respectively, under this section..... The Secretary may waive the matching fund requirement [of 50 percent] for any fiscal year if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year.” (b) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Special Needs) : Funds will be distributed to the institutions on a quarterly basis. See Appendix A of the Capacity Request for Applications (RFA) for the specific allocation. Cost Sharing or Matching 1862 Land-grant Institutions in the 50 States must match 100 percent of the Special Needs funds they receive with funds from non-Federal sources such as State or county appropriations. The matching must be in the form of cash. Matching funds must be used for extension activities approved in the eligible institution’s 5-Year Plan of Work. (c) Smith-Lever Special Needs Program : Cost Sharing or Matching Pursuant to rules and policies governing Section 3(b) & (c) of the Smith–Lever Act, as amended through Public Law 107-293, no allotment shall be made to a State under subsection (b) or (c), and no payments from the allotment shall be made to a State, in excess of the amount that the State makes available out of non-Federal funds for cooperative extension work. 1. To comply with the matching requirements of the Special Needs Program, applicants are required to provide 100 percent matching funds from non-federal sources for all proposed federal funds sought in the application. In-kind and third party contributions are not allowed for the Smith-Lever Special Needs program. Grant awards cannot be issued until ALL required matching has been documented and verified. 2. Matching Alternative.— Extension Directors may certify an offset of guaranteed non-Federal funds to your application. The signed certification of offset must be scanned and included as a PDF attachment (see Part IV.,B.,2.,c.,(1) for specific instructions). 3. Matching Exception.— Insular Areas: In lieu of the matching funds requirement, the insular areas of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands of the United States shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources in an amount equal to not less than 50 percent of the grants awarded. The Secretary may waive this matching fund requirement for any fiscal year if the Secretary determines that the government of the insular area will be unlikely to meet the matching requirement for the fiscal year. Insular applicants may submit a waiver request as a PDF attachment to the application (see Part IV.,B.,2.,c.,(2) for specific instructions). For all projects: Matching: Applications shall include written verification of commitments of matching support from non-federal sources. Written verification means: The sources and the amount of all matching support from outside the applicant organization should be summarized on a separate page and placed in the application as a part of the Budget Justification attachment (see Field K on the Form SF 424 (R&R) Budget). Include the matching amount, the budget category for the match, and detail how the matching support, from each source, will be used (e.g., salary and position supported). Additionally, all pledge agreements must be included as a PDF attachment in Field K as well. The value of applicant contributions to the project shall be established in accordance with the applicable cost principles. Applicants should refer to OMB Circulars A-21, Cost Principles for Educational Institutions; A-87, Cost Principles for State, Local, and Tribal Governments; 2 CFR Part 215, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations (OMB Circular A–110); for further guidance and other requirements relating to allowable costs. (d) CSRS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET CSRS Retirement): This program is no longer funded by NIFA. The deadline for the FY 2015 Request for Applications (RFA) was October 15, 2014. (e) FERS Retirement Contributions Program (aka ERET FERS Retirement): This program is no longer funded by NIFA. The deadline for the FY 2016 RFA was July 20, 2015. (f) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (Cooperative Extension Programs) aka EUDC: There is no matching requirement for these funds. 2. Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University (Section 1444): The 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, including Tuskegee University and West Virginia State University, are eligible for funds appropriated under this Act according to the following formula: Any funds annually appropriated under NARETPA section 1444 up to the amount appropriated for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1978, pursuant to section 3(d) of the Act of May 8, 1914, as amended, for eligible institutions, will be allocated among the eligible institutions in the same proportion as funds appropriated under section 3(d) of the Act of May 8, 1914, as amended, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1978, are allocated among the eligible institutions. Of the funds in excess of that amount, 20 per cent will be allotted among the eligible institutions in equal proportions; 40 per cent will be allotted among the eligible institutions in the proportion that the rural population of the State in which each eligible institution is located bears to the total rural population of all the States in which eligible institutions are located, as determined by the last preceding decennial census current at the time each such additional sum is first appropriated; and the balance will be allotted amount the eligible institutions in the proportion that the farm population of the State in which each eligible institution is located bears to the total farm population of all the States in which the eligible institutions are located, as determined by the last preceding decennial census current at the time each such additional sum is first appropriated. For purposes of computing the distribution, the allotments to Tuskegee University and Alabama A&M University will be determined as if each institution were in a separate State. Cost Sharing or Matching NARETPA section 1449 (7 U.S.C. 3222d) states that “the State shall provide matching funds from non-Federal sources. Such matching funds shall be for an amount equal to not less than ... 100 percent of the formula [capacity grant] funds to be distributed to the eligible institution for fiscal year 2007 and each fiscal year thereafter. ... Notwithstanding [redistributing the funds], the Secretary may waive the matching funds requirement ... above the 50 percent level for any fiscal year for an eligible institution of a State if the Secretary determines that the State will be unlikely to satisfy the matching requirement.” 7 CFR 3419.1 defines “matching funds” as “funds from non-Federal sources made available by the State to the eligible institutions ... [for] programs or activities that fall within the purposes of agricultural research and cooperative extension under sections 1444 and 1445 of NARETPA ...or [for] qualifying educational activities. Matching funds means cash contributions and excludes in-kind matching contributions.” It defines “non-Federal sources” as “funds made available by the State to the eligible institution either through direct appropriation or under any authority (other than authority to charge tuition and fees paid by students) provided by a State to an eligible institution to raise revenue, such as gift acceptance authority or user fees.” Finally, it defines “qualifying educational activities” as “programs that address food and agricultural sciences components of an eligible institution.” 7 CFR 3419.6 states that “The required matching funds for the formula programs shall be used by an eligible institution for agricultural research and extension activities that have been approved in the plan of work required under sections 1444(d) and 1445(c) of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977... or for .. qualifying education activities.” Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution. 3. SMITH-LEVER 3(d): (a) Expanded Food and Nutrition (EFNEP) (ENUT Nutrition Education): Section 7116 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (FCEA) amended Section 1425 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3175) to accomplish the following: Notwithstanding section 3(d) of the Smith-Lever Act of May 8, 1914 [7 U.S.C. 343(d)] for administration, technical, and other services for coordinating the extension work of the Department and the several States, Territories, and possessions the remainder shall be allocated among the States as follows: 1. 1862 Institutions shall receive a base in an amount equaling their FY 1981 allocation. 2. Four percent (4%) shall be available for administrative expenses. 3. $100,000 will be distributed to each 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Institution including the University of the District of Columbia. 4. Effective fiscal year (FY) 2009 – 10 percent of funds appropriated for EFNEP in excess of funds appropriated will be allocated to the 1890 Institutions in an amount that bearing the same ratio to the population living at or below 125 percent of the poverty level (as prescribed by the Office of Management and Budget and as adjusted pursuant to section 673(2) of the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C.9902(2))) in the State where the 1890 Institution is located; bears to the total population living at or below 125 percent of the poverty level in all States where 1890 Institutions are located; as determined by the most recent decennial census at the time when the appropriated amount first exceeds levels appropriated for EFNEP. The FY 2009 rate of 10 percent is to increase by 1 percentage point annually until FY 2014 – maxing out at 15 percent and remaining at that level for every year thereafter. 5. The remainder will be allocated to each 1862 Land-Grant Institutions in an amount that bears the same ratio to the total amount allocated as the population living at or below 125 percent of the poverty level in the State; bears to the total population living at or below 125 percent of the poverty level in all States; as determined by the most recent decennial census at the time at which each such additional amount is first appropriated. Cost Sharing or Matching There is no cost-sharing or matching requirement for these funds. (b) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (c ) Improve Rural Quality of Life: Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (d) Farm Safety: NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined: • Farm Safety; • Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and • Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project. Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (e) New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (f) Pest Management: Program was consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (g) Sustainable Agriculture (SARE-PD): NOTE: Effective Fiscal Year 2014, Programs under Sustainable Agriculture (research, education and extension) were merged into a single program under the research account. See CFDA Number 10.215 for pertinent details. (h) Federally Recognized Tribes: Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (i) Youth Farm Safety Education & Certification: NOTE: The following Farm Safety Programs were combined: • Farm Safety; • Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification Program; and • Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities -National AgrAbility Project. Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (j) EIPM Support: Program was consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (k) EIPM Coordination: Program was consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). 4. OTHER EXTENSION ACTIVITIES: (a) Renewable Resources Extension Act (RREA): The majority of the appropriated funds are distributed to eligible institutions based on a formula that considers the geographic extent, ecosystem productivity, economic contribution, and population for each state. Since FY 2002, a small amount of these funds have been used to fund National Focus Fund Projects. (RREA-NFF). NIFA does not require matching support for this program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria. (b) Rural Health and Safety (RHSE): The Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program provides funds to meet national goals for addressing the health and access needs of rural Americans. NIFA does not require matching or cost sharing support for this program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria. NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities. (c) Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (TCEP): Appropriated funds are to be awarded to the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions for Extension work and funds are to be distributed on the basis of a competitive application process. NIFA does not require matching support for this program, and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria. Under the TCEP, the use of grant funds to plan, acquire, or construct a building or facility, or to acquire land, is not allowed. With prior approval, in accordance with the cost principles set forth in OMB Circular No. A-21, grant funds may be used to purchase equipment, or for improvements, alterations, renovations, or repairs to land, buildings, or equipment, deemed necessary to retrofit existing spaces and resources in order to carry out a funded project under this grant. However, requests to use grant funds for such purposes must demonstrate that such expenditures are incidental to the major purpose for which the grant request is made and no more than twenty-five percent of the project budget may be used to purchase equipment. Any equipment purchased with Federal funds is the property of the grantee or the subgrantee, as appropriate. (d) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (RYD): This Program has not been funded for several years. (e) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (f) Federal Administration (DIRECT APPROPRIATION): Refer to the most current Request for Applications (RFA) for specific instructions. Pertinent details to be reflected in the CFDA database at a future date. . (g) 1890 Facilities (Section 1447): NIFA assessed four percent (4%) of the appropriated amount for Federal Administration, distributed sixty percent (60%) of the balance equally, and distributed the remaining forty percent (40%) based on the formula found in Section 1444 of NAREPTA of 1977, as amended (Pub. L. No. 95-113). Within each institution, the research, teaching and extension programs must each receive at least 20 percent of the annual allocation. The remaining 40 percent may be allocated based on institutional needs for research, teaching, or extension. No more than 60 percent of the total allocation should be directed to research, teaching, or extension. However, if there are unique situations in your institution which warrant a deviation from these guidelines, we will consider requests for reallocation. Such reallocations must be justified by the submission of a situation statement which describes the research, teaching, and extension facilities needs in your institution and how previously available Federal funds were utilized. NIFA does not require matching support for this program and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria. The obligation and expenditure of funds awarded under these grants are limited to equipment, land, buildings and other related costs which are or will be used in the administration and conduct of approved research, teaching and extension activities. In accordance with NARETPA Section 1447 (e), funds provided for this program may not be used for the payment of any overhead costs of the eligible institutions. Further, in accordance with Section 7129 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (House Conference Report 113-333, to accompany H.R. 2642), Central State University has the Designation as 1890 Institution.

MOE requirements are not applicable to this assistance listing.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
The statutory time limits, project periods, including no-cost extensions of time, varies: • For some of the projects, funds must be fully expended in the fiscal year of appropriation. • For some projects, funds may be carried over for up to one (10 year after the end of the year for which they were appropriated. • For other projects, the statutory time limit may range from one (1) to five (5) years. NOTE: The applicable statutory time limit is reflected in the Award document and the Award Terms and Conditions. Further details are provided in the Award document Form NIFA-2009 and the NIFA General Terms and Conditions Grants and Cooperative Agreements (dated October 2016) at: https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: JOINT PROGRAM: Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-capacity-grant Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions - (Special Needs) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resources/FY18-CES-SLSN-Modification-882017.pdf Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-sections-3b-and-3c-special-needs-capacity-grant 1890 LGI's and Tuskegee, West Virginia & Central State: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/agricultural-extension-programs-1890-institutions Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/fy2017-efnep-rfa https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-webneers Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/youth-farm-safety-education-and-certification-program New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE) https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (CYFAR); Sustainable Community Projects (CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development Technology Assistance (CYFAR-PDTA): Sustainable Community Projects (SCP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects Military: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-military https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/cyfar-4-h-military-partnership-professional-development-and-technical-assistance Professional and Technical Assistance (PDTA): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-professional-development-and-technical Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program) (TCEP) and Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se Renewable Resources Extension Act Program - (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/renewable-resources-extension-act-capacity-grant https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse 1890 Facilities Grant Program (and Renewals): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) http://www.farad.org/ Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities Healthy Homes Partnership: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/healthy-homes-partnership RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. NIFA utilizes the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP), a secure, web-based electronic payment and information system that allows federal agencies to administer funds. Currently, ASAP is the only payment source for new NIFA grantees.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
NIFA is transitioning to a new location for Fiscal Year 2020. NIFA's New Mailing Address AFTER September 30, 2019 follows: National Institute of Food and Agriculture 6501 Beacon Drive Kansas City, MO 64133 Represents additional Websites: http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/smith-lever-special-needs-competitve-grants-program http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-institution-teaching-research-and-extension-capacity-building-grants-cbg http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-and-expanded-food-and-nutrition http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-%13-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae http://nifa.usda.gov/program/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-grant-program http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants
Headquarters Office
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader,
Institute of Food Production and Sustainability, Division of Plant Systems-Protection, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2240, Telephone: (202) 401-4939; Fax: (202) 401-1782.

ADDITIONAL CONTACTS:
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Production and Sustainablity, Division of Agricultural Systems, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2240, Telephone: (202) 401-0151; Fax: (202) 401-5179;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Office of the Director, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2201, Telephone: (202) 401-1112; Fax: (202) 690-1290;

USDA, NIFA. National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Telephone: (202) 720-9278; Fax: (202) 720-9366;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition, Division of Nutrition, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2225, Telephone: (202) 401-2138; Fax: (202) 401-6488;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Bioenergy, Climate, and Environment, Division of Global Climate Change, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2210, Telephone: (202) 401-4926; Fax: (202) 401-1705;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Youth and 4-H, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Telephone: (202) 690-4568; Fax: (202) 720-9366;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Community and Education, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Telephone: (202) 720-2324; Fax: (202) 720-2030;

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Bioenergy, Climate and Environment - Division of Environmental Systems, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2210, Telephone: (202) 720-5229; Fax: (202) 720-3945;

AND

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Family and Consumer Sciences, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Telephone: (202) 720-4795; Fax: (202) 720-9366.
Washington , DC 20250-2240 US
Policy@nifa.usda.gov
Phone: (202) 401-4939
Fax: (202) 401-1782
Website Address
http://nifa.usda.gov/grants
Financial Information
Account Identification
12-0502-0-1-352
Obligations
(Project Grants) FY 18$458,921,654.00; FY 19 est $14,837,771.00; FY 20 est $0.00; FY 17$455,489,177.00; - SPECIAL NOTES: (1) The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years. (2) Previously numerous programs were included in CFDA # 10.500, for the Cooperative Extension Service (CES). During Fiscal Year 2017, ten (10) new CFDA numbers were created, which was part of an initiative to break out the separate programs contained in CFDA # 10.500 (CES). NIFA?s implementation became effective for fiscal year (FY) 2019 Request for Applications (RFAs) and new awards for the following programs: CFDA # 10.511: (1) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (including Special Needs) (aka 1862 CES); (2) District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (aka DCPPERA); Joint RFAs have been published in recent years. and (3) Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program (aka SLSNCGP). CFDA # 10.512: Agriculture Extension at 1890 Land-grant Institutions (aka 1890 LGIs ? Section 1444) CFDA # 10.513: 1890 Facilities Grant Program (including Renewals) CFDA # 10.514: Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (aka EFNEP) CFDA # 10.515: Renewable Resources Extension Act (including National Focus Fund Projects) (aka RREA and RREA-NFF) CFDA # 10.516: Rural Health and Safety Education (aka RHSE) CFDA # 10.517: Tribal Colleges Extension Program (including Special Emphasis) (aka Extension Services as 1994 Institutions, TCEP and TCEP-SE) and Federally Recognized Tribes Extension Program (FRTEP) CFDA # 10.518: Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD) CFDA # 10.520: Agriculture Risk Management Education Partnership Competitive Grants Program (aka ARME and/or RME) CFDA # 10.521: Children, Youth, and Families At-Risk (including Sustainable Community Projects and Professional Development and Technical Assistance) (aka CYFAR; CYFAR-SCP and CYFAR-PDTA) and CYFAR ? Military Partnerships
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive project grant, or cooperative agreement are established, these amounts will be announced in the annual Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFAs are available as follows: JOINT PROGRAM: Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-capacity-grant Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions - (Special Needs) (Capacity): https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resources/FY18-CES-SLSN-Modification-882017.pdf Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/smith-lever-act-sections-3b-and-3c-special-needs-capacity-grant 1890 LGI's and Tuskegee, West Virginia & Central State: https://nifa.usda.gov/program/agricultural-extension-programs-1890-institutions Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/fy2017-efnep-rfa https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-webneers Farm Safety and Youth Safety Education and Certification https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/youth-farm-safety-education-and-certification-program New Technologies at Ag Extension (NTAE) https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/new-technologies-ag-extension-ntae Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (CYFAR); Sustainable Community Projects (CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development Technology Assistance (CYFAR-PDTA): Sustainable Community Projects (SCP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar-sustainable-community-projects Military: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-military https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/cyfar-4-h-military-partnership-professional-development-and-technical-assistance Professional and Technical Assistance (PDTA): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/archive-children-youth-and-families-risk-professional-development-and-technical Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/federally-recognized-tribes-extension-program-frtep-formerly-extension-indian Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program) (TCEP) and Special Emphasis (TCEP-SE): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-services-program-capacity-tcep https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-extension-program-special-emphasis-tcep-se Renewable Resources Extension Act Program - (RREA) and National Focus Fund Projects (RREA-NFF): https://nifa.usda.gov/program/renewable-resources-extension-act-capacity-grant https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/renewable-resources-extension-act-national-focus-fund-projects-rrea-nff Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/rural-health-and-safety-education-competitive-grants-program-rhse 1890 Facilities Grant Program (and Renewals): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/1890-facilities-grants-program-renewals Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (FARAD) http://www.farad.org/ Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program): https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agriculture-risk-management-education-partnerships-arme-competitive-grants Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities: National AgrAbility Project: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/agrability-assistive-technology-program-farmers-disabilities Healthy Homes Partnership: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/healthy-homes-partnership RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Capacity, Competitive, and/or Non-Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
As an administrator of U.S. government support, NIFA works in partnership with grantees to ensure responsible stewardship of federal funds. Our grantees and partners are required to comply with all relevant rules and regulations. The following resources are provided to NIFA's partners and award recipients to support their adherence to federal regulations governing program performance: NIFA's primary (main) website: https://nifa.usda.gov/regulations-and-guidelines The following represent specific documents and direct links: POLICY GUIDE NIFA's Federal Assistance Policy Guide describes agency policies and procedures. https://nifa.usda.gov/policy-guide CERTIFICATIONS AND REPRESENTATIONS Certifications and representations provided through the NIFA application process. https://nifa.usda.gov/certifications-and-representations ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF USDA SUPPORT BY NIFA When acknowledging USDA support in accordance with 2 CFR Part 415, grantees must use the following acknowledgement for all projects or initiatives supported by NIFA. https://nifa.usda.gov/acknowledgment-usda-support-nifa FEDERAL REGULATIONS The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) lists all regulations published in the Federal Register. https://nifa.usda.gov/federal-regulations FOIA The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) provides that any person has the right to request access to federal documents and information such as research data. https://nifa.usda.gov/foia NEPA POLICY AND GUIDANCE The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Policy and Guidance set the standard for identifying potential environmental impacts. https://nifa.usda.gov/nepa-policy-and-guidance OGFM ISSUED CORRESPONDENCE The Office of Grants and Financial Management occasionally issues correspondence to applicants, grantees, and/or the general public for informational or clarification purposes. https://nifa.usda.gov/ogfm-issued-correspondence RESEARCH MISCONDUCT NIFA requires that all its awardees adhere to the USDA Scientific Integrity Policy and the Federal Policy on Research Misconduct. https://nifa.usda.gov/research-misconduct NIFA'S GENERAL AWARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS Award terms and conditions are determined by statutory, regulatory, and agency requirements, as well as each grant's circumstances. Terms and conditions dictate important items related to your grant, including method of payment, reporting frequency and content, and prior approval requirements. References to the terms and conditions of awards are located on the NIFA 2009 Award Fact Sheet. NIFA's general award terms and conditions (see link below) is applicable to this program, for awards with an award date on December 26, 2014 and thereafter. https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016.
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2017 Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 – ACTIVE Programs: (A), (B) and (CC) - Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (LGIs) and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (aka DCPPERA) (A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions Fiscal Year 2017 The Healthy Lifestyle Programs: Maricopa County increased nutritional & physical activity knowledge, and improved associated behaviors and health through research-based nutrition education programs. Horticulture Program: Extension demonstrated and taught various horticulture topics for 24 internet videos. Footage was produced, edited and posted on YouTube and Vimeo. Viewers accessed these 24 videos 113,623 times in 2017. The video on Killing Stumps has been the most accessed video on the USU Extension Channel. Food Safety Program: a total of 132 individuals were trained and certified on the ServSafe program, Better Processing for School trained 205 food handlers, 68 persons acquired skills on the Seafood HACCP, GAP training was conducted for 330 farmers and producers and 510 persons gained food safety knowledge and skill through workshops and seminars. Human Health, Environment, Family, Youth, Society and Community Program: A workshop was developed specifically for people who work with agricultural producers and farm families who want to know more about managing farm-related stress and learn ways to approach and communicate with those in need. 501 participants attended the program: 76% increased their understanding of the current agriculture financial situation; 88% increased their understanding of the impact that stress has on their own bodies; 92% were able to recognize warning signs of depression, suicide, and mental illness; 96% learned where to send people for help in the community, and of those, over 60% said their awareness of community resources greatly increased. Natural Resources and Environmental Stewardship Program: In one state, farmers attending field days reported they implemented no-till/ strip till on 79,546 acres, of which 7,758 were new acres, and fall seeded cover crops on 38,258 acres, of which 12,203 were new acres. Attendees also reported that they had seeded 513 acres of prairie strips within row crop fields. (B) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (Smith-Lever Special Needs) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: University of Alaska-Fairbanks supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. University of Arizona supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. Colorado State University supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. University of Idaho supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. University of Vermont supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. (CC) University of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) The College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSES) implement cooperative extension program. CAUSES offered a wide range of cooperative extension and continuing education programs through five land-grant centers: (1) the Center for Urban Agriculture & Gardening Education; (2) the Center for Sustainable Development and Resilience, which includes the Water Resources Research Institute; (3) the Center for Nutrition Diet & Health, which includes the Institute of Gerontology; (4) the Center for 4-H & Youth Development; and (5) the Center for Architectural Innovation and Building Science, which includes the Architectural Research Institute and the Building Science Institute. (C ) Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program [Section 3 (b) & (c )] Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: Examples of projects funded through the Smith Lever Special Needs Grants are: (1) National Youth Preparedness Initiative: Preparing Teens; Preparing Communities - Phase 2; (2) Community Decision Making and Financial Planning for Natural and Man-made Disasters; (3) Disaster Education in Rural Southern Appalachian Communities with Large Transient Populations; and (4) Increasing Southeastern Public Wildfire Preparedness through the Master Gardener Volunteer Education Program (D) Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University, and Central State University – (aka 1890 LGIs) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: Strengthening Families In one state there were 39 founded cases of child fatalities, 51 cases of unfounded fatalities and 31 pending cases of fatalities and a total of 120 investigations of child deaths due to suspected abuse or neglect in 2017. That same year, there were 55,258 reported cases of possible abuse/neglect. Research consistently indicates that living in poverty, unemployment, inadequate housing and conflict between parents are stressors that interfere with a parent’s ability to effectively raise children. The results/outcomes of the training is as follows: 95 % of parents increased knowledge in understanding child development, 90 % of parents increased knowledge of effective parenting practices; 97 % of parents increased knowledge in nurturing children 95% of parents increased knowledge in guiding children. Practice outcomes: 93 % of parents have adopted practices in guiding children; 95 % of parents will use community resources to meet their needs; 97% of parents adopted practices to reduce family conflict and manage stress. Social and Economic Opportunity: Small Farm Program is an Extension program designed to help farm families with decision-making skills to solve farm and home problems. One of the goals of the Small Farm Program is to focus on developing a sub-wholesale system that will readily provide nutrient-dense foods of high quality and reduced price to the communities. Food Systems and Food Safety Historically Disadvantaged Farmers Go Commercial-The Institution helped a group of farmers to: form the Small Farmer Agricultural Cooperative; negotiate agreements with Wal-Mart and each other, and obtain production equipment and supplies and wells, access to transportation and refrigeration units, and training and technical assistance on commercial-level harvesting and grading, packing and processing, food safety, integrated pest management, and record keeping. Agricultural Production and Processing: Detection of diseases in farmed raised fish is not as readily visible as in other terrestrial livestock species. Fish are raised in aquatic environments and are not easily visible to the farmer. Proper diagnosis of fish diseases prevents catastrophic losses to the producer. Healthy fish used as foodfish, baitfish, or for stocking waters for recreational fishing ensures the safety of seafood for human consumption and prevents the spread of diseases to other aquatic systems. The Institution’s Fish Health Inspection labs conducts routine health inspections; issues health certificates for fish being shipped to other states and countries, conducts inspections for the baitfish certification program, analyzes water quality, and identifies aquatic weeds. In 2017, personnel at the labs conducted 342 disease diagnostic cases (1670 fish total and 414 water quality/aquatic weed identification cases). (E) & (EE) - Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (aka EFNEP) and EFNEP WebNEERS (Competitive) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2017: The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is funded as a national program, not as individual projects. All seventy-six 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Institutions receive EFNEP funding each year and these are the only entities eligible for EFNEP funding. EFNEP is designed to assist limited resource audiences in acquiring the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and changed- behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets, and to contribute to their personal development and the improvement of the total family diet and nutritional well-being. Specific examples of EFNEP outcomes and impacts are given in EFNEP’s 2017 Impact Report (see https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resource/EFNEP-2017-Annual-Report.pdf). (G), (H) & (W) – Farm Safety, Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification, and Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities (AgrAbility Project) NOTE: Programs were combined in FY 2012. Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: The AgrAbility program at NIFA enhances the quality of life for agricultural workers with disabilities by providing farmers and ranchers with disabilities with farm safety education, assistive technology assistance, and networking support that enable them to return to / remain active in production agriculture. Funded at $180,000 per year, SRAPs provide substantial, sustained return on NIFA’s investment in farm safety. The following are selected examples of AgrAbility projects funded in FY 2017: • AgrAbility of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, VA; • Kentucky AgrAbility, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY. • Colorado AgrAbility Project, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO; • AgrAbility of Utah, Utah State University, Logan, UT. The FY 2017 YFSEC awards, made through a competitive grant process, helped build upon and strengthen SAY activities and accomplishments to date, as well as identify and address curricula and outreach gaps. The following are YFSEC projects funded in FY 2017: • YFSEC Instructor Training Project, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; • Safety in Agriculture for Youth – Enhancing Youth Training Resources, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH; • Safety in Agriculture for Youth: Maintaining a National Clearinghouse, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; (I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: The NTAE grant enable eXtension to scale up the successful Impact Collaborative model and focus on three key issues: behavioral health, food systems; and diversity and inclusion. (J), (U) & (V) - Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (aka CYFAR), Sustainable Community Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP) and Professional Development and Technical Assistance (aka CYFAR-PDTA) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2017: (1) This CYFAR program has partnered with Juvenile Justice and Office of Children's Services to provide life skills and workforce development for teens ages 14-18 who are going on parole or aging out of the foster care system. (2) This Family Leadership Training Institute strengthens the Extension system by providing staff development and program delivery in two (2) high need communities to improve outcomes for youth and families. (3) This Sustainable Community Project will utilize parenting education through food safety, physical activity and gardening activities. Childhood overweight and obesity and proper nutrition will also be targeted to provide healthy living alternatives. (4) The CYFAR Project supports teen decision-making and empowerment at all levels of the program and actively encourages youth-adult partnerships as a key component of the learning process. Teens meet once a week during the school year, after school. During the summer, teens will be involved in skill building camps and conferences/service retreats to develop new skills as well as prepare for the next year's focus. (5) This CYFAR Project mission is to provide positive growth and character development experiences for children who qualify for the program based on family income. The curriculum is focused on healthy lifestyle choices and during the five (5) week intensive opportunity, it is centered on sports, fitness, swimming, nutrition, computers, financial literacy, careers, gang avoidance, service learning, and select special events. (L) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: Washington State University – Colville Reservation Extension Program: A few of the objectives are as follows: (1) Improve trust of USDA and enhance utilization of University and USDA resources through building upon the established Colville Reservation Extension Office and the outreach it has offered; (2) Provide culturally relevant information and educational outreach to promote efficiencies, marketing, risk management, and competiveness for geographically isolated agricultural enterprises; and (3) Provide reservation focused outreach education and programs to American Indian agricultural producers and land managers on the reservation to improve the sustainable management of agricultural land, forests, rangelands, water and other natural resources; University of Wyoming – Wind River: One (1) objective is to improve agricultural operations for farmers and ranchers through the continued facilitation of producer association meetings and the promotion of value added/marketing activities at educational seminars. Montana State University FRTEP: One (1) objective includes providing youth development programming in mentoring to develop social, emotional and academic competencies, provide cultural and natural resource 4-H projects, Youth Aware of Mental Health training, and 4-H project clubs. University of Florida – Increasing the Knowledge of Optimal Production Strategies for Agricultural Operations, and Empowering Youth with Beneficial Life Skills in the Seminole Tribe of Florida: The agriculture/ranching component is primarily focused on improving profits of Seminole Ranchers. University of Nevada – Walker River Paiute Tribe FRTEP Project: The long-term goal of this FRTEP program for the Walker River Paiute Tribe is to build capacity with farmers and ranchers in production and financial management, create a strong youth development component, and assist the tribe in economic development planning. The short-term goals are to increase knowledge: 1) in agricultural best practices, livestock production, and what USDA programs are available; 2) in youth workforce development, increase vegetable intake and build life-skills; and 3) in economic development planning for the tribal and individual tribal members. (M) & (BB) - Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions Program (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and TCEP) and Tribal Colleges Extension - Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: 1) Tundra Garden Project: This special emphasis project supports an indigenous garden in Barrow, Alaska that promotes knowledge of nutrition and traditional foods. The grant funding will support several experts including agronomists, herbalists, and traditional healers who can in the expansion of the project. 2) Cultivating Future Leaders through Education, Experience and Civic Engagement: This special emphasis project is designed to create a pool of students ready to pursue post-secondary education in areas of agriculture, life sciences, forestry and natural sciences, mainly through mentoring and camps. 3) Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College Full Circle Nutrition Program: This special emphasis project is a "Garden to Plate" program. The campus garden will provide food for the campus cafeteria so that students gain a stronger connection to food, nutrition, culture and community supported agriculture. 4) Improving Agricultural Production for Navajo Farmers and Ranchers through effective Tribal College Extension Service: This project provides support to reservation farmers and ranchers. Dine Extension professionals will establish one-on-one relationships with producers and visit them monthly to introduce new management techniques and strategies to enhance Navajo agricultural production. . 5) Aaniiih Nakoda College Extension Program Capacity Grant: The program will provide a reservation wide network of educators and service providers focusing on issues of health, wellness, nutrition, and community development on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation. Training included irrigation, pest control, soil management, plant identification and weed control. (N) & (O) - Renewable Resources Extension Act Program – (aka RREA) and - National Focus Fund (Competitive) Projects (aka RREA-NFF) Congress appropriated $3,597,600 for the RREA Capacity Program in Fiscal Year (FY) 2017. These funds supported a total of 73 1862, 1890, and insular land-grant universities. Examples of project impacts include: 1. Your Land, Your Legacy: Deciding the Future of My Land - Land is probably one of the most valuable assets a landowner has. Deciding what will happen to the land after the owner is gone is a critical step in land stewardship. 2. Kentucky Forest Sector Economic Contribution - Forests cover nearly half the state of Kentucky and are the foundation of a forest sector that is a major economic force in the Commonwealth and as of 2016, account for $13.92 billion in total economic contributions. 3. Oregon Citizen Fire Academy - Oregon Citizen Fire Academy is a collaborative education and service program designed to increase the outreach capacity of fire agencies and, ultimately, to maintain and enhance fire-adapted communities. 4. Heirs Property - Land loss among limited resource and minority landowners has increased dramatically over recent years and continues to impact the ability to generate income and sustain their ownerships. One of the most serious problems is that of heir property, where land has been passed down through generations with little if any documentation of ownership. 5. Reading the Range - Reading the Range is a collaborative program involving ranchers, range Extension Specialists, and agency personnel that aims to increase rangeland monitoring as a standard operating procedure on ranches by providing examples, called demonstration ranches, and technical assistance. (P) Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education) RHSE projects funded in FY 2017 focused on chronic disease prevention and management and the prevention and reduction of opioid misuse and abuse. A few examples are as follows: University Extension Engaged to Raise Awareness and Prevent Opioid Misuse Before It Starts: A USDA-funded grant with State Extension Service, Preventing Opioid Misuse and Abuse in the SouthEast (PROMISE) Initiative, is integrating an upstream, multi-phased approach to promoting prescription opioid misuse prevention including: (1) Community engagement forums to assess the perceived needs and readiness of community for education on this topic; (2) Extension agent-led and peer-to-peer education; (3) a social marketing campaign; and (4) placement of prescription drug take-back boxes throughout the community. Nearly half the state is categorized as rural. Therefore, the target population of the PROMISE Initiative is rural residents. The PROMISE Initiative is currently in phase one of the project, conducting community engagement forums in three high-risk and rural counties. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Interventions to Prevent Opioid Abuse and Misuse in a Rural State: Opioids are commonly prescribed for chronic pain sufferers, but new CDC guidelines recommend against opioids as the first course of treatment for chronic pain. Instead, CDC advises that non-drug strategies such as muscle strengthening exercise, yoga, and cognitive-behavioral self-management may be more effective long-term. However, these approaches may do little to help rural residents with chronic pain because of extremely limited or nonexistent access to programs and services. Cognitive-behavioral approaches, such as chronic pain self-management programs, are often unavailable in rural counties; access to fitness facilities, classes, and knowledgeable instructors is likewise extremely constrained. Expanding The Evidence-Based Prosper Delivery System to Address the Opioid Epidemic: State University’s Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute, in collaboration with Extension and Outreach, is working to become part of the solution to the opioid epidemic in rural Iowa communities. The USDA’s National Institute on Food and Agriculture is funding the PROSPER Rx project, the goal of which is to reduce prescription opioid demand and availability. This work is being accomplished through community-based teams led by Extension educators in three counties that are delivering evidence-based programming for youth and families, engaging in broad-based awareness-building activities, and coordinating with rural healthcare providers and law enforcement to distribute educational materials promoting safe medication storage and disposal. Preventing Opioid Abuse in a Rural State: A multi-disciplinary team assembled in 2017 and is working through a USDA-NIFA Rural Health and Safety Education Grant to prevent opioid abuse in rural parts of the state using a two-pronged approach. The first approach is targeting youth and families through the PROmoting School-community-university Partnerships to Enhance Resilience (PROSPER) evidence-based model developed by Iowa State and Pennsylvania State Universities to prevent alcohol and drug abuse in youth. Through this model, community teams are developed to oversee implementation of family and school-based interventions. For this project the family-based intervention being used is Strengthening Families 10-14, while Botvin Life Skills Training is being provided to youth in the schools. Empowering Youth and Families: State University is stepping up to the challenge to prevent opioid misuse in rural communities in the state. Through a grant from USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the State 4-H Empowering Youth and Families Program together with the State Office of Rural Health, are working to empower families and communities in three rural counties. Families with youth ages 10-14 meet weekly to participate in educational sessions that provide age-appropriate research- and evidence-based training in the art of family building and the impact of opioid misuse. They are given the opportunity to practice their new skills and behaviors. (Q) 1890 Facilities Grant Program (aka Section 1447 Grants) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: 1890 Facilities Grant Program: Funds were used to continue improvements in instructional, research, and extension facilities, by dedicating funds to construct an access road to the Agricultural Experiment Station. The new road improves travel to and from the facility which is used by research, extension and education faculty, community partners, and visitors. Efforts put forth under this initiative ensures adequate safety of users, durability of vehicles and other equipment traveling on the access road to protect lives. 1890 Facilities Grant Proposal (FY 2017): The Institution established and equipped two new greenhouses that support research and extension activities, installed a 40x40 square foot shade house adjacent to the greenhouses, and purchased and installed three high tunnels in the field near the greenhouse area. Enhancement of Teaching, Research and Extension Facilities – 2017: Funds were used to continue with the construction of a Complex for Urban and Sustainable Agriculture, Food, Education and Research Building and the establishment of a Community Garden and Student Farm. Both initiatives will be engaged in education, research, extension, and community outreach activities. The focal point will be sustainable agriculture and urban, local, and community food systems education for producers, consumers, and students. Facilities Grant Program – FY 2017: Facilities funds were used to: 1) complete the relocation of an Agricultural and Environmental Research Station to the newly identified and improved site (former rehabilitation center); 2 finalize the renovation of the F. Ray Powers building, which will house the Integrated Research and Extension Facility; and 3) Continue site improvements and begin work to partially condition buildings E and A at the new research station to support additional programming related to Extension and Research activities. Enhancing Research, Extension, and Academic Facilities and Equipment: Funds were used for the following ongoing objectives: 1) reconstruction of the aquaculture research ponds –Phase II; 2) renovation to the Adair-Greenhouse building for Human Sciences; and 3) purchase and update various equipment and non-construction materials/supplies to support research, Extension, and instructional needs. (R) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD) Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: The Funded Project Network Nodes are as follows: (1) Coordinated national program, develop pharmacokinetic modeling approaches and provided pharmacokinetic support to FARAD components, and on a rotating schedule with other network nodes, provided responses to emergency queries (telephone, internet) from the FARAD Hotline. (2) Maintained the pharmacokinetic, bibliographic and call center databases and web-based access to the kinetic and bibliographic citation files. On a rotating basis with other network nodes, this node also provided responses to drug and contaminant residue questions submitted to FARAD. (3) Collected and entered data for the US Approved Animal Drugs Database (US-AADD), maintained internet websites for FARAD, created and supported platforms for mobile devices to access the Veterinarian's Guide to Residue Avoidance Management (VetGRAM) and other mobile-friendly applications, and distributed electronic alerts and updates via email, Twitter and other electronic formats. (4) On a rotating schedule with other network nodes, provided responses to emergency telephone calls from the FARAD hotline. (T) Agriculture Risk Management Education Program (aka RME Program); NOTE: Mandatory program delegated to another USDA agency (Risk Management Agency) but administered by NIFA. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: Examples of funded projects are: (1) Empower the strengths and skills of individuals in the Southern region who are involved in the management of agricultural production, marketing, financial, legal and human resource risks. Strive to improve producers’ ability to manage risk and increase profitability of southern agriculture by delivering programs designed to change risk management behavior among key producer populations; (2) Provide technology support to regional centers. Continue to develop and expand the delivery of risk management education through the online Ag Risk and Farm Management Library. Provide electronic support to provide Results Verification System. Provide public access to a searchable archival database of the results of all risk management education funded projects so risk management education providers can better collaborate and learn from each other; (3) Deliver risk deliver risk management education to help agricultural producers to manage risks and position their farm or ranch for future growth and success. Identify and assess producer risk management education needs and emerging issues through efforts with several producer and stakeholder groups, including special emphasis audiences. Building on the needs assessment results, the Center will implement an annual competitive grants program for both educational and exploratory projects that deliver or lead to producer-focused, results-based risk management education; (4) Provide U.S. agricultural producers and their families, as appropriate, with knowledge, skills and tools needed to make informed risk management decisions that may enhance the profitability of their operations; and (5) Provide leadership in activities to create environments that support learning, collaboration, and partnerships to develop and deliver programs that improve agricultural producers' ability to manage risk in increasingly uncertain climate and economic environments. (DD) Healthy Homes Partnership Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: 1) Healthy Homes Toolkit Curriculum 2) Healthy Homes publications, Everyone Deserves a Safe and Healthy Home, educators and general public versions. 3) Healthy Homes Social Media messaging 4) Healthy Homes App (Apple Store) 5) Healthy Homes Advisory Groups established in 10 states (GG) Agriculture in the Classroom Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: NIFA provided $529,920 to support Agriculture in the Classroom (AITC). Activities in the following categories were supported: 1) Strengthening local, state AITC programs; 2) USDA AITC recognition programs; 3) AITC website and national agricultural literacy curriculum matrix maintenance; 4) Research and evaluation projects; 5) Curriculum development and development of materials to support teacher pre- and in-service trainings; 6) Outreach and collaborations with other organizations and agencies; and 7) Support of the national center for agricultural literacy. Additional details and recourses available from www.agclassroom.org. (HH) Air Force Personal Financial Readiness Program Evaluation Development Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: No data available. The Program was not yet established. (II) Substance Abuse Program at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas Fiscal Year (FY) 2017: AgriLife Extension provided prevention education through four main programming areas within the Army Substance Abuse Program (ASAP) at Joint Base San Antonio (JBSA). Educational services and programming were disseminated in a "non-clinical" format to military personnel and families. Programming areas include: Prevention Training: AgriLife Extension coordinated and implemented ASAP prevention training programs for service members and families and deliver continuing education training for unit leaders. Trainings delivered included: Army Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention (ADAPT), Driving and Driving, ASAP Informational, Educational Training Brief, Newcomers Brief and Warrior Transition Council (WTC) Training. (JJ) Food and Agriculture Service Learning Program There was no competition in FY 2017. The grantee was awarded a no-cost extension. The listing below represents Programs which have not been recently funded. Hence, no further action is required (N/A/N) for the following Programs: (F) Pest Management; NOTE: Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (K) Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education - Professional Development (aka SARE-PD); NOTE: SARE Chapters 1 & 3 were combined in FY 2014. See CFDA # 10.215. (S) Grants to Youth Serving Institutions (aka Rural Youth Development Grants Program and RYD); (X) Extension IPM Coordination and Support Program (IPM-CS); Program was subsequently, consolidated under CFDA # 10.329, Crop Protection and Pest Management (CPPM). (Y) Extension Outreach on the Marketplace Exchanges of the Affordable Care Act; (AA) Second Language & Culture Exposure for Children Project (aka SLCECY); and (FF) 4-H Military Partnership Professional Development and Technical Assistance Program (4HMP-PDTA).
Fiscal Year 2018 Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 – ACTIVE Programs: (A), (B) and (CC) - Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (aka CES Smith-Lever Regular and CES Smith-Lever Special Needs), and District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (aka DCPPERA) [Section 3 (b) & (c )] - (Capacity previously known as Formula) (A) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-grant Institutions (Regular) Crop Program - Russian olive control: The program created 45 YouTube videos about gardening, calibration, and Russian olive control, which was frequently viewed by a wider audience. The extension service worked on Russian olive control programs. As a result, the team removed over 160 miles of Russian olive along riparian areas and treated over 350 trees in 2018. Beef Production: To be competitive in the beef market, producers must understand existing beef management practices and be informed of new technologies as they develop. The UGA Beef Team currently offers the Master Cattlemen's Program, which involves detailed, in-depth, educational seminars related to beef cattle. There were 66 participants in the Master Cattlemen's Program in 2018. There have been 517 graduates of the Master Cattlemen program from 2014 to fall of 2018. Integrated pest management: In 2018, the extension service served 160,767 adults, 203,293 youth, and 17,260 volunteers and launched a complete online course including eleven modules on Integrative Pest Management. In 2018, beginning farmers were offered 15 topic-specific webinars on basic agricultural production practices, business management and marketing. This type of programming helps support the success of these small businesses that have an impact on the economic and social stability, and food security of their communities. The series resulted in 3,820 webinar views. Vegetable Production: The Veggie Bytes newsletter was emailed to approximately 750 recipients. Many of those recipients have indicated that they in turn forward it to personal email lists as well. The individual children’s garden series events were well received by parents. In 2018 the program averaged 20 children at each event, with a 90% knowledge gain per event. Each event targeted one question. An example would be “are worms beneficial to the garden?” Children rise their hands yes or no at the beginning of the activity and again at the end. Grape Production: Because of outreach and education activities, stakeholders learned and adopted practices that can lead to increased agricultural efficiency and profitability. Most of the growers in the production area for the Autumn King grape variety are now using different plant growth regulators to improve the fruit quality. This is one of the major late table grape varieties. It is anticipated that this will lead to an increase in vineyard productivity with high fruit quality, helping promote table grape marketing and profitability. (B) Cooperative Extension Programs at 1862 Land-Grant Institutions (Smith-Lever Special Needs) (Capacity Grant Program) Fiscal Year (FY) 2018: A land grant university supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. Another land grant university supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. A third land grant university supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. A fourth land grant university supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. A fifth land grant university supported innovative, education based approaches to provide cooperative agricultural extension work on education and technical assistance; long range family, farm, community and planning projects; communication delivery’ and dissemination of credible, science-based information. (C ) Smith-Lever Special Needs Competitive Grants Program [Section 3 (b) & (c )] Examples of projects funded through the Smith Lever Special Needs Grants are: (1) Simplified Plans for Food, Water and the Essentials During Disasters; (2) National Youth Preparedness Initiative: Preparing Teens: Preparing Communities Phase 3 Expansion; (3) Inland and Coastal Flooding Preparation, Mitigation and Recovery in Contiguous States; (4) Preparing UC ANR to respond to disasters in California communities; (5) Developing In-Person and On-line Resources for Gardeners and Backyard Poultry Keepers in California Following Wildfires; and (6) LADDER: Local Approach to Discussion-Based Disaster Exercises and Readiness (CC) - University of the District of Columbia Public Postsecondary Education Reorganization Act Program (DCPPERA) The College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSES) implement cooperative extension program. CAUSES offered a wide range of cooperative extension and continuing education programs through five land-grant centers: (1) the Center for Urban Agriculture & Gardening Education; (2) the Center for Sustainable Development and Resilience, which includes the Water Resources Research Institute; (3) the Center for Nutrition Diet & Health, which includes the Institute of Gerontology; (4) the Center for 4-H & Youth Development; and (5) the Center for Architectural Innovation and Building Science, which includes the Architectural Research Institute and the Building Science Institute. (D) Agricultural Extension at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, West Virginia State University, and Central State University – (aka 1890 LGIs and Section 1444) -(Capacity, previously known as Formula) 4-H FISHING DERBY This catch and release event, for youths ages five – 15, is held each fall, drew 50 – 60 children and adults in 2018, and teaches the joys of fishing to a younger generation. Young participants begin the day by learning casting techniques with fishing rods. They then fish from a catch and release pond in a fun and somewhat competitive atmosphere. Fish types and sizes are recorded; youths snagging the largest fish, largest bass and most fish caught earned awards. The activity includes presentations by representatives from the local Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Division of Fish and Wildlife. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF STEM CURRICULUM Due to the changing nature of the 21st century workplace, youth need the skills, experience and confidence necessary to meet its demands and thrive in a high-performance economy characterized by high-skill, high-wage employment. This project will introduce students to and encourage an interest in science and other STEM fields in students at an early age. Students oftentimes lose interest in STEM subjects by middle school (Grades 6-8). Early interventions help to create a STEM pipeline for students to go on to major in STEM majors and enter careers in the STEM fields. (E) & (EE) - Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (aka EFNEP) [Smith-Lever - Section 3 (d)] - (Capacity previously known as Formula) and EFNEP WebNEERS (Competitive) FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2018: The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is funded as a national program, not as individual projects. All seventy-six 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Institutions receive EFNEP funding each year and these are the only entities eligible for EFNEP funding. EFNEP is designed to assist limited resource audiences in acquiring the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and changed- behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets, and to contribute to their personal development and the improvement of the total family diet and nutritional well-being. Specific examples of EFNEP outcomes and impacts are given in EFNEP’s 2018 Impacts on https://nifa.usda.gov/program/expanded-food-and-nutrition-education-program-efnep). (G), (H) & (W) – Farm Safety, Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification, and Assistive Technology Program for Farmers with Disabilities (AgrAbility Project) NOTE: Programs were combined in FY 2012. The AgrAbility program at NIFA enhances the quality of life for agricultural workers with disabilities by providing farmers and ranchers with disabilities with farm safety education, assistive technology assistance, and networking support that enable them to return to / remain active in production agriculture. Funded at $180,000 per year, SRAPs provide substantial, sustained return on NIFA’s investment in farm safety. The following are selected examples of AgrAbility projects funded in FY 2018: • AgrAbility in the Last Frontier: Alaska, University of Alaska, AK. • Indiana AgrAbility Project, Purdue University, IN. • Missouri AgrAbility Program, University of Missouri Extension, MO. • Tatanka Ki Owetu, The Renewal AgrAbility Project, South Dakota State University, SD. • California AgrAbility Project, University of California – Davis, CA. The FY 2018 YFSEC awards, made through a competitive grant process in FY 2017, continue to help build upon and strengthen SAY activities and accomplishments to date, as well as identify and address curricula and outreach gaps. The following are YFSEC projects funded in FY 2018: • YFSEC Instructor Training Project, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; • Safety in Agriculture for Youth – Enhancing Youth Training Resources, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH; • Safety in Agriculture for Youth: Maintaining a National Clearinghouse, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE. (I) New Technologies at Ag Extension (aka NTAE) In Fiscal Years 2017-2018, eXtension continued to work from its 2015-2018 strategic plan which charged eXtension to apply its technology expertise and broad national network to become a major catalyst for increasing innovation and the impact of CES professionals’ work throughout the entire CES. The third year of NTAE has been a year of continued growth and transition. eXtension remains committed to maintaining and continuing to advance its original core services and objectives. At the same time, eXtension is developing and fast-tracking many new initiatives to address those same objectives, including the innovation and professional development initiative it has branded as the Impact Collaborative for Food Systems, Behavioral Health, and Diversity and Inclusion. eXtension has addressed the objectives for Year Three to advance visible and measurable impact throughout CES, both nationally and locally. (J), (U), (V) & (FF) - Children, Youth, and Families At- Risk (aka CYFAR), Sustainable Community Projects (aka CYFAR-SCP); Professional Development and Technical Assistance (aka CYFAR-PDTA); and Military Partnership FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2018: (1) Reduce homelessness, increase workforce skills. “Fostering Youth towards a Revolution of Responsibility” seeks to provide more preventative intervention efforts early on in order to decrease the need for intervention later on. The programming will be taught through experiential education theory, hands-on model. Focusing on building life skills through experiential learning is the success of the 4-H model. Teens will have a say in what life skills they would like to focus on. (2) The tripartite intervention is based upon family resilience theory and focuses on strengthening self-care and parenting skills in custodial grandparents, developing communication and leadership skills in grandchildren, and increasing the ability of service providers to meet grandfamilies' needs. The long-term long term goal is to create an effective evidence-based intervention to improve quality of life for custodial grandparents and their grandchildren. (3) Project staff partnered with schools on two reservations to implement STEM during their school science classes. Teachers have been trained in aerial photography, GPS/GIS use of iPad technology to create films and CAD software to create 3D objects and provide in- class, monthly program days where students engage in hands-on activities. (4) Cohort 1 entered their third year of program implementation is focused on interacting with professionals in their community to learn about careers and opportunities in STEM fields. In addition, partnership with faculty at the university each year to offer the Science Pathways Summit during which teens visit faculty to learn about their research and their career path. (5) The program employs cutting-edge food production technology to grow healthy foods while promoting healthy eating in urban neighborhoods characterized as food deserts. Students gained 21st century employment skills through coursework, internships, and service learning projects. Students become enmeshed in new professional networks among local food industry professionals. (6) The Extension 4-H Military Liaisons at Land Grant Universities and military child and youth program staff members in Army Child, Youth and School Services, Air Force Child and Youth Programs, and Navy Child and Youth Programs are the target audience for professional development and technical assistance. More than 5,000 military personnel participated in professional development opportunities. Training was provided through face- to-face opportunities and distance education. Training topics include Essential Elements of 4-H, Experiential Learning Model, Conducting 4-H Club Meetings, and specific 4-H project curriculum. Through the delivery of quality positive youth development programs, 4-H helped military youth develop confidence and become capable and caring youth with life skills to thrive in today’s world. (L) Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (aka FRTEP) Washington State University – Colville Reservation Extension Program A few of the objectives are as follows: (1) Improve trust of USDA and enhance utilization of University and USDA resources through building upon the established Colville Reservation Extension Office and the outreach it has offered; (2) Provide culturally relevant information and educational outreach to promote efficiencies, marketing, risk management, and competiveness for geographically isolated agricultural enterprises; and (3) Provide reservation focused outreach education and programs to American Indian agricultural producers and land managers on the reservation to improve the sustainable management of agricultural land, forests, rangelands, water and other natural resources; University of Wyoming – Wind River One (1) objective is to improve agricultural operations for farmers and ranchers through the continued facilitation of producer association meetings and the promotion of value added/marketing activities at educational seminars. Montana State University FRTEP One (1) objective includes providing youth development programming in mentoring to develop social, emotional and academic competencies, provide cultural and natural resource 4-H projects, Youth Aware of Mental Health training, and 4-H project clubs. University of Florida – Increasing the Knowledge of Optimal Production Strategies for Agricultural Operations, and Empowering Youth with Beneficial Life Skills in the Seminole Tribe of Florida The agriculture/ranching component is primarily focused on improving profits of Seminole Ranchers. University of Nevada – Walker River Paiute Tribe FRTEP Project The long-term goal of this FRTEP program for the Walker River Paiute Tribe is to build capacity with farmers and ranchers in production and financial management, create a strong youth development component, and assist the tribe in economic development planning. The short-term goals are to increase knowledge: 1) in agricultural best practices, livestock production, and what USDA programs are available; 2) in youth workforce development, increase vegetable intake and build life-skills; and 3) in economic development planning for the tribal and individual tribal members. (M) & (BB) - Extension Services at the 1994 Institutions Program (aka Tribal Colleges Extension Program and TCEP) and Tribal Colleges Extension - Special Emphasis (aka TCEP-SE) 1. ADOPTING A COMMUNITY COALITION APPROACH FOR ADDRESSING SUBSTANCE ABUSE ON THE FORT BELKNAP INDIAN RESERVATION The mission of the Aaniiih Nakoda College (ANC) Extension Program aims to promote healthy, sustainable, and prosperous lives for Fort Belknap residents. This project aims to form a community coalition comprised of representatives from local institutions to focus on community-level changes that target substance abuse to promote healthy living and sustainability for community collaboration. This approach will be a systematic, community-level approach to evaluate current community resources with the goal of improving their effectiveness in meeting the needs defined by the community concerning the issue of substance abuse. By forming a community coalition to address substance abuse, this project empowers the community to use their own indigenous worldview and epistemology while empowering them to resolve complex issues. 2. RETURN OF THE SALMON PEOPLE: INDIGENOUS IDENTITY AND FOOD SOVEREIGNTY The proposed project has three goals that are in support of restoring the biodiversity of Native Plants systems and promoting increased development and continued revitalization of traditional wellness systems, by bridging the gap between the overall health, the community and food sovereignty. Project activities will take place within the Lummi tribal community, which consists of 5,234 enrolled members in addition to the other tribal communities served by NWIC. The goals are designed to increase capacity and sustainability of food sovereignty efforts and balance health and wellness for the communities we serve. 3. YOUTH HERITAGE PROGRAM Intrinsic to Menominee sustainable life-ways are the prehistoric and historical adaptations revealed through recent archaeological investigations that demonstrate the use of raised agricultural fields radiocarbon dated between A.D. 750 and A.D. 1,650. Program participants are introduced to this more than 1,000 year heritage of sustainable life-ways through active engagement in test excavations and by participating in the preparation, planting, maintenance and harvesting of the Menominee Cultural Museum demonstration garden now in its fourth year of cultivation. A late summer harvest and feast will bring together all participants serving to highlight, interpret and evaluate the insights gained from the demonstration garden and test excavations, goals and benefits of developing food security on the reservation and acknowledgement of the student participants. Traditional foods for the feast are prepared from the garden harvest with assistance from the UW-Extension staff at CMN. 4. GROWING THE CIRCLE: STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY FOOD SECURITY THROUGH COLLABORATION,EDUCATION, AND HEALTHY FOOD ACCESS This proposal will build on previous work promoting gardening, local and traditional foods, and other approaches to improving community and family-scale food security. The goal is to increase the intake of local or traditional foods in the diets of the people of the White EarthNation by supporting three modes of healthy food interventions that provide:1. Active support and mentoring of participant families in growing food at community gardening sites managed by WETCC, White Earth Natural Resources Department (WENRD) and at the White Earth Food Distribution Center (WEFDC).2. Access to local and traditional foods along with educational support made available at/by the WEFDC.3. Access to similar food and education opportunities made available through the WENRD Food Truck and Tribally Supported Agriculture (TSA) Program.We will also:1. Continue to grow out and expanding our holdings of the Indigenous bean cultivars.2. Analyze their nutrient density.3. Compile the agronomic and nutritional data, and the traditional knowledge collected for each cultivar into fact sheets that will be made available as printed documents and as downloadable pdf's. 5. MICHIGAN INDIAN COUNTRY EXTENSION INITIATIVE This project is designed to be the foundational stages in the development of what ultimately will be a seamless, integrated, and intentional Land Grant System in Michigan serving all Native American communities and citizens. Over time, the resultant integrated system will include all 4 Land Grant Institutions (1862 and 3 1994s) in Michigan, all 12 federally recognized Tribes, and NIFA. The existing integrated Land Grant collaboration between Bay Mills Community College (BMCC) and Michigan State University Extension (MSUE), NIFA, and community partners is serving the Bay Mills Indian Community very well, and has produced a template for expanded and impactful involvement with all Tribal Nations and communities in Michigan - this is precisely the model of integrated and sustained 1862/1994 collaboration that the leadership at NIFA has been working to establish. The first two years of this effort, partially funded by Extension-Special Emphasis funds will include communication and education efforts, relationship building, formalizing the Indian Country Land Grant team, hosting initial Michigan Tribal Land Grant summits, and initiating more programming with Tribal communities. (N) & (O) - Renewable Resources Extension Act Program – (aka RREA) (Capacity, previously known as Formula) and - National Focus Fund (Competitive) Projects (aka RREA-NFF) Congress appropriated $4,060,000 for the RREA Capacity Program in FY 2018. These funds supported a total of 73 1862, 1890, and insular land-grant universities. Examples of projects: A Grazing and Livestock Management Academy provides participants with instruction in sustainable range and pasture management practices, in a variety of topics including plant growth basics, principles of grazing management, grazing animal behavior, range and pasture animal nutrition, and range and pasture monitoring. A new state-based program called the Ecosystem Climate Adaptation Network was started with RREA funding support. The Ecosystem Climate Adaptation Network (ECAN) is a community of practice for people interested in climate adaptation to protect ecosystems. A southern statewide RREA program conducted as part of the state’s Economic Opportunities for Individuals and Communities focus area, taught landowners and natural resource professionals available silviculture options, forest herbicide technology, and timber marketing. A Ranch Practicum program is an intensive “hands-on” learning experience emphasizing a "systems" approach to livestock, rangeland, and business management extended over 3 seasons. Participants reported gaining new knowledge in 29 identified areas of livestock, range, and financial management improved 23% in knowledge gained. Expanding the knowledge of northeast foresters was the goal of the Northeast Silviculture Institute for Foresters was a series of 5 modules on the major northeast forest types. Each two-day workshop provided foresters with the knowledge to make science-based decisions for forest ecosystem management, harvests and regeneration. The Woodland Steward is a 16-page, full-color publication that includes in-depth articles on forest stewardship and health, invasive species and pests, wildlife habitat management, economics, and more. (P) Rural Health and Safety (aka Rural Health & Safety Education) Bringing Families Together to Combat the Opioid Epidemic The Empowering Youth and Families Program (EYFP) is a 12-week educational program that includes the Strengthening Families Program 10-14 and Powerful Communities (PC) curricula. PC includes lessons that explicitly target the impact of substance use on health. Each lesson in PC incorporates protective factors as revealed through research on adverse childhood experiences (ACES) and prepares families to be active leaders in opioid misuse prevention within their communities. To date, 25 families have benefitted from the EYFP Program. Preventing Opioid Misuse And Abuse In A Rural Area Through Enhanced Family And Community Education And Training The purpose of this project is to address opioid addiction, abuse, and overdose death issues involving relationships and economic conditions by using evidence-based PROSPER (Promoting School-Community-University Partnerships to Enhance Resilience). PROSPER is a unique system for disseminating school and family evidence-based programs (EBPs), using partnerships created between the Cooperative Extension System (hereafter Extension), schools, and community partners. The PROSPER approach is being used to deliver the following curricula:1. Strengthening Families Program 10-14 (family-based) 2. LifeSkills Training (school-based)3. Lions Quest-Skills for Adolescence (school-based)In addition to the PROSPER system with curricula, we will also deliver two programs to the broader communities in which the school-based programs exist:1. Generation Rx: a website-based toolkit to educate people of all ages about the potential dangers of misusing prescription medications. 2. Mental Health First Aid® is an evidence-based education program with proven ability to teach individuals how to recognize and respond to individuals demonstrating signs and symptoms of mental illness, including substance use disorder, and link them with appropriate professional mental health services and support strategies. Prospering Step-By-Step, State-By-State (P2s) - Demonstrating An Extension-Based Opioid Prevention Training And Capacity Building System The primary goal of this proposed project is to implement and evaluate a five-step, Extension-powered prevention training and capacity-building system guided by the scientifically-proven PROSPER prevention delivery system. The PROSPER delivery system remains one of the few models proven as efficacious for the high-quality delivery of evidence-based programs, and it currently is the only system designed for use within Extension that has been shown to reduce opioid misuse through a randomized controlled trial. Our primary prevention training and capacity-building goals will be pursued with an innovative partnership. PROSPER’s positive results to date are expected to be enhanced by the proposed five-step training and capacity-building system that adapts PROSPER, adding programming content and prevention strategies to specifically address the risks of opioid and prescription drug misuse. The proposed five-step training and capacity-building system entails: (1) Mobilizing and Organizing at the State Level, with ongoing inputs from an Extension Stakeholder Advisory Group; (2) Core Training at the County Level for P2S Implementation; (3) Conducting Core Programming/ Prevention Activities; (4) Conducting Specialty Trainings (e.g., media, environmental strategies); and (5) Building Capacity for Expansion and Sustainability, including county sustainability planning and a training of trainers process, for PROSPER states. Significantly, this project will demonstrate a model that can be readily scaled up, initiating groundwork among Extension-based stakeholders and prospective P2S trainees in other states, enhancing their capacity to support a comprehensive community systems approach to address the opioid epidemic and achieve positive impacts for their youth and families. Protecting The Homestead: Opioid Misuse Prevention To address the risk of opioid misuse among farming/ranching families, this project team will implement an evidence-emerging prescription opioid misuse prevention program while also coordinating a public health campaign. Extension professionals and healthcare providers will be trained to implement the This is (Not) About Drugs program with farming/ranching families in counties identified as shortage areas. To further educate families and professionals, a series of webinars and educational resources will be created and distributed through a public health campaign. As the result of project activities, farming/ranching families are expected to report attitudinal changes in their view of prescription opioid misuse, and report greater access to informational resources about opioid misuse. Extension professionals are expected to increase their self-efficacy in responding to opioid-related concerns in their communities. Program outcomes will be evaluated through pre- and post-test assessments distributed before and after exposure to the prevention program and the public health campaign. Growing Effective Health Promotion In A Rural State: The Prosper Program The proposed project will allow expansion of PROSPER into new rural communities. The PROSPER (PRomoting School-university-community Partnerships to Enhance Resilience) began in Pennsylvania in 2001 as a large, federally funded dissemination project. The goal of PROSPER is to promote healthy development and to avoid long-term health and behavioral problems in rural youth through the use of universal, evidence-based interventions. Following the conclusion of federal funding in 2005, six of the original PROSPER communities assumed local responsibility for sustaining their PROSPER programs, and resources were located to expand PROSPER to additional communities throughout the state. Programs are delivered to students and their families in grades 5-8. PROSPER provides ongoing technical assistance to teams to assure ongoing high quality of program delivery. The PROSPER evaluation involved a rigorous trial that followed participants through aged 19 and compared long-term rates of substance use, problem behavior, family strengths, and positive youth development in communities that did and did not receive PROSPER programming. Findings were significant for all outcomes measured. (Q) 1890 Facilities Grant Program (aka Section 1447 Grants) ENHANCING RESEARCH, EXTENSION AND ACADEMIC FACILITIES Funds are being used to acquire land and construct a new building for the School of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Human Sciences. The facility will be visible to the community and present in a neighborhood conducive to attract students, researchers, and limited resource farmers. FACILITIES GRANT PROGRAM The institution will utilize the funds to renovate and upgrade obsolete laboratories, and two obsolete and decommissioned facilities for up-to-standard laboratories. The addition of new research laboratories in areas of specialty crops, food science, and water resource will assist research scientists in leveraging additional resources from external grants for further development of their research programs. It will also provide additional resources for the academic for hand-on training and extension programs to provide more research-based solutions and trainings to farmers. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CENTER FOR AGRICULTURE INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP Funds are being designated to establish a Center of Agriculture Innovation and Entrepreneurship by renovating a historic building that will primarily serve as a small business incubator to promote agribusinesses in the state. The center will provide support for commercialization and marketing of agricultural products required for successful business development. UNIVERSITY FACILITY GRANT PLAN 2018-2023 The institution has identified the following five objectives: 1) Repair and pave roads at its Research and Development (R&D) Farm; 2) construct a value-added processing building at the R&D Farm; 3) replace and expand the R&D Farm office building and Wet Laboratory; and 4) replace and expand the Aquaculture Office and Laboratory with the Aquaculture Water Quality and Disease Laboratory and the Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory. RENOVATION AND MODERNIZATION OF FOOD, AGRICULTURE, NATURAL RESOURCES, AND HUMAN SCIENCES FACILITIES Facilities funds will be used to: 1) Renovate laboratories, office and meeting space in Trigg Hall; 2) renovate and upgrade of facilities supporting human sciences teaching and research; 3) renovate and repurpose the animal exhibition hall within the Food Science and Technology Building as an Agriculture and Science Discovery Center that will underpin its youth development programs in Extension, as well as other extension education training; 4) renovate and modernize the research and education facilities for its small ruminate program; and 5) upgrade research facilities at the Paul Sarbanes Coastal Ecology center to support its aquaculture research and education programs. (R) Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database Program (aka FARAD) The Funded Project Network Nodes were as follows: (1) Coordinated national program, develop pharmacokinetic modeling approaches and provided pharmacokinetic support to FARAD components, and on a rotating schedule with other network nodes, provided responses to emergency queries (telephone, internet) from the FARAD Hotline. (2) Maintained the pharmacokinetic, bibliographic and call center databases and web-based access to the kinetic and bibliographic citation files. On a rotating basis with other network nodes, this node also provided responses to drug and contaminant resi