1994 Institutions Research Program

 

The Tribal Colleges Research Grants Program (TCRGP) (aka 1994 Institutions Research Program) is a competitive grants program supporting fundamental and/ or applied agricultural research projects that address high priority concerns of tribal, national or multi-state significance. The program funds investigative and analytical studies and experimentation in the food and agricultural sciences (as defined in section 1404 of the NARETPA (7 U.S.C. 3103) and Part VIII, E. of this RFA). TCRGP seeks to advance the body of knowledge in the basic and applied natural and social sciences within the food and agricultural sciences.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
10.227
Federal Agency/Office
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of Agriculture
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
B - Project Grants
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2016 For FY 2016: NIFA made ten (10) awards to seven (7) institutions totaling $1,674,391. The 1994 Research Program is a competitive grant where recipients are selected via peer review. Applicants may apply at four (4) different levels. A Student Research Experience can be funded up to $65,000; a Research Capacity Building Option up to $85,000 and a New Discovery Research option up to $200,000 and New Discovery with significant student research (five or more students) set at $220,000. There is no limit on the number of applications that can be submitted by an institution and multiple awards can be made. In FY 2016, there were two (2) student projects, one (1) capacity and seven (7) new discovery; four (4) of those included significant student research. Further, two (2) proposals that were not funded in FY 2015, re-submitted enhanced applications and received awards in FY 2016. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) made ten (10) awards to seven (7) institutions totaling $1,674,391. The 1994 Research Program is a competitive grant where recipients are selected via peer review. Applicants may apply at four (4) different levels. A Student Research Experience can be funded up to $65,000; a Research Capacity Building Option up to $85,000 and a New Discovery Research option up to $200,000 and New Discovery with significant student research [five (5) or more students] set at $220,000. There is no limit on the number of applications that can be submitted by an institution and multiple awards can be made. In FY 2016, there were two (2) student projects, one (1) capacity and seven (7) new discovery; four (4) of those included significant student research. Further, two (2) proposals that were not funded in FY 2015, re-submitted enhanced applications and received awards in FY 2016.
Fiscal Year 2017 NIFA made ten (14) awards to seven (13) institutions totaling $2,240,078. One school received two awards. The 1994 Research Program is a competitive grant where recipients are selected via peer review. There were 18 proposals accepted for review. Each proposal was evaluated and scored by three reviewers. Applicants could apply at five (5) different levels. A Student Research Experience can be funded up to $60,000; a Research Capacity Building Option up to $95,000 and a New Discovery Research option up to $200,000 and New Discovery with significant student research (five or more students) set at $220,000. In 2017 it was also possible to receive a “Pathways to Research” grant. This grant helps a 1994 Land Grant build scientific capacity in order to become a more competitive funding candidate. Pathways awards were funded up to $59,954. For the FY 2017 program, there were no restrictions in the number of applications that an eligible institution may submit through grants.gov. NIFA would only award up to two research awards to any one institution in the New Discovery Research option and up to two awards in the Capacity Building option with a limit of three awards total to any one eligible institution in response to the FY 2017 RFA. An institution applying for a “Pathways to Research” award could not receive more than one award overall. In FY 2017, there were two (2) pathways projects, two (2) student projects, one (1) capacity and nine (9) new discovery; seven (7) of those included significant student research. Further, one (1) proposals that was not funded in FY 2016, re-submitted enhanced applications and received an award in FY 2017.
Fiscal Year 2018 Fiscal Year (FY) 2018: The combined total amount available for awards was $4,144,240. (A) TRIBAL COLLEGES RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM (TCRGP) NIFA made 13 awards to 13 institutions totaling $2,144,240. The 1994 Research Program is a competitive grant where recipients are selected via peer review. There were 17 proposals accepted for review. Each proposal was evaluated and scored by three reviewers. Applicants could apply at five (5) different levels. A Student Research Experience can be funded up to $60,000; a Research Community Capacity Building Option up to $95,000 and a New Discovery Research option up to $200,000 and New Discovery with significant student research (five or more students) set at $220,000. For the FY 2018 program, there were no restrictions in the number of applications that an eligible institution may submit through grants.gov. NIFA would only award up to two research awards to any one institution in the New Discovery Research option and up to two awards in the Capacity Building option with a limit of three awards total to any one eligible institution in response to the FY 2017 RFA. An institution applying for a “Pathways to Research” award could not receive more than one award overall. In FY 2018, there were two (2) student projects, one (3) community capacity and nine (1) new discovery; seven (7) of those included in the New Discovery Extended. (B) TRIBAL COLLEGE RESEARCH AREA OF EXPERTISE (TCRAE) FY 2018 was the first year for this Program. There were four proposals funded out of 14 submitted to four different institutions. $2,000,000 was awarded to this program.
Fiscal Year 2019 Fiscal Year (FY) 2019: The combined total amount available for awards was $3,514,143. (A) TRIBAL COLLEGES RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM (TCRGP) The RFA for this program is currently published and it will close on November 2, 2019. Available funding for this program is $3,495,074. (B) TRIBAL COLLEGE RESEARCH AREA OF EXPERTISE (TCRAE) The TCRAE program was included in the TCRGP RFA for 2019. This is funded from the same appropriated funds. The available for both of these programs for 2019 is $3,514,143.
Fiscal Year 2020 Fiscal Year (FY) 2020: Based upon the President’ Budget, the combined total amount projected for awards is $1,644,432. (A) TRIBAL COLLEGES RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM (TCRGP) The projected FY 2020 appropriations are the same as 2019. The RFA will close March 2020. (B) TRIBAL COLLEGE RESEARCH AREA OF EXPERTISE (TCRAE) The TCRAE program was included in the TCRGP for 2019.
Authorization
Section 1405 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (NARETPA), as amended (7 U.S.C. 3121), designates the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) as the lead Federal Agency for agricultural research, extension, and teaching in the food and agricultural sciences. Authority for this program is contained in the Equity in Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 301 note), as amended by the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7601 note). In accordance with the statutory authority, subject to the availability of funds, the Secretary of Agriculture may award competitive grants, as defined in section 536 of the Equity in Educational Land Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 301 note), to assist the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions in conducting agricultural research that addresses high priority concerns of tribal, national or multi-state significance., 7 U.S.C. 301 note
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
Bay Mills Community College, Blackfeet Community College, Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Cheyenne River Community College, Dine Community College, D-Q University, Dullknife Memorial College, Fond Du Lac Community College, Fort Belknap Community College, Fort Berthold Community College, Fort Peck Community College, LacCourte Orielles Ojibwa Community College, Little Big Horn Community College, Nebraska Indian Community College, Northwest Indian College, Oglala Lakota College, Salish Kootenai College, Sinte Gleska University, Sisseton Wahpeton Community College, Sitting Bull College, Stonechild Community College, Turtle Mountain Community College, United Tribes Technical College, Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute, Institute of American Indian Arts, Crownpoint Institute of Technology, Haskell Indian National University, Leech Lake Tribal College, College of the Menominee Nation, and Little Priest Tribal College.
Beneficiary Eligibility
Current Listing of 1994 Land-Grant Institutions (aka Tribal Colleges): Aaniiih Nakoda College; Bay Mills Community College; Blackfeet Community College; Cankdeska Cikana Community College; Chief Dull Knife College; College of Menominee Nation; College of the Muscogee Nation; Dine' College; Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College; Fort Peck Community College; Haskell Indian Nations University; Ilisagvik College; Institute of American Indian Arts; Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College; Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College; Leech Lake Tribal College; Little Big Horn College; Little Priest Tribal College; Navajo Technical University; Nebraska Indian Community College; Nueta, Hidatsa and Sahnish College; Northwest Indian College; Oglala Lakota College; Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College; Salish Kootenai College; Sinte Gleska University; Sisseton Wahpeton College; Sitting Bull College; Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute; Stone Child College; Tohono O'odham Community College; Turtle Mountain Community College; United Tribes Technical College; and White Earth Tribal and Community College.
Credentials/Documentation
The System for Award Management (SAM) combines eight federal procurement systems, including CCR, and the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance into one new system. CCR activities are conducted through SAM (the CCR website will redirect users to SAM). Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM): Each applicant (unless excepted under 2 CFR SS 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal awarding agency under 2 CFR SS 25.110(d)) is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) Provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal awarding agency. It also must state that the Federal awarding agency may not make a Federal award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Federal awarding agency is ready to make a Federal award, the Federal awarding agency may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a Federal award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. Applicants must furnish the information required in the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs). Successful applicants recommended for funding must furnish the information and assurances requested during the award documentation process. These include, but are not limited to the following: Organizational Management Information - Specific management information relating to an applicant shall be submitted on a one time basis, with updates on an as needed basis, as part of the responsibility determination prior to the award of a grant identified under this RFA, if such information has not been provided previously under this or another NIFA program. NIFA will provide copies of forms recommended for use in fulfilling these requirements as part of the preaward process. Although an applicant may be eligible based on its status as one of these entities, there are factors which may exclude an applicant from receiving Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits under this program (e.g., debarment or suspension of an individual involved or a determination that an applicant is not responsible based on submitted organizational management information). This information collection is approved under OMB Circular Control No. 0524-0026, "Assurance of Compliance with the Department of Agriculture Regulations Assuring Civil Rights, Compliance and Organization Information." SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available as follows: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-research-grants-program-tcrgp RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
Preapplication coordination is required. An environmental impact statement is required for this listing. An environmental impact assessment is not required for this listing. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372. All RFAs are published on the Agency’s website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) only accepts electronic applications which are submitted via Grants.gov in response to specific Requests for Applications (RFA). Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. For information about the pre-award phase of the grant lifecycle application processes see: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/learn-grants/grants-101/pre-award-phase.html. Further, applicants must follow the instructions provided in the NIFA Grants.gov Application Guide, which can be assessed as follows: Adobe NIFA Applications. 2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA's Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-research-grants-program-tcrgp RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Award Procedure
Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA. Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application. Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the Competitive Request for Applications (RFA). 2 CFR 200 - Subpart C and Appendix I and 2 CFR part 400 apply to this Program. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-research-grants-program-tcrgp RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional location, as appropriate for application deadlines
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
From 30 to 60 days. Contact the National Program Leader (NPL), as indicated per CFDA Section # 152 - Headquarters Office regarding dates for specific deadlines, start and end dates, and range of approval/disapproval time. Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. NIFA's respective links regarding general information are provided below: http://nifa.usda.gov/ http://www.grants.gov. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for further specific and pertinent details. The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-research-grants-program-tcrgp RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database.
Appeals
Not Applicable. 2 CFR Part 200 - Subparts D & E apply to this program.
Renewals
Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA), which are generally published annually. The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-research-grants-program-tcrgp
How are proposals selected?
2 CFR part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards and 2 CFR part 400 USDA's Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards apply to this program. Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-research-grants-program-tcrgp
How may assistance be used?
This research grants program is authorized to conduct agricultural research that addresses high priority concerns of tribal, national or multi-State significance.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
Performance Reports: PERFORMANCE MONITORING: See above for pertinent and specific details.
Auditing
In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, Subpart F-Audit Requirements nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more during the non-Federal entity's fiscal year in Federal awards must have a single or program-specific audit conducted for that year in accordance with the provisions of this part. A non-Federal entity that expends less than $750,000 during the non-Federal entity's fiscal year in Federal awards is exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in SS 200.503. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO). This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.
Records
In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, SS 200.333 Retention requirements for records. Grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three (3) year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved. 2 CFR 200 Subpart D applies to this program.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
Statutory formula is not applicable to this assistance listing.

Matching requirements are not applicable to this assistance listing.

MOE requirements are not applicable to this assistance listing.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
The term of competitive project grants and/or cooperative agreements under this program may not exceed three (3) years. 2 CFR Part 200, Subpart D applies to this program. In accordance with statutory time limits, project periods, including no-cost extensions of time, are not to exceed five (5) years. Further details are provided in the Award document Form NIFA-2009 and the NIFA General Terms and Conditions Grants and Cooperative Agreements (dated October 2016) at: https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016. SPECIAL NOTE: Please refer to the Competitive Request for Applications (RFAs) for specific and pertinent details. The most current RFAs are available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-research-grants-program-tcrgp RFAs are generally released annually. Hence, the RFAs provide the most current and accurate information available. Any specific instructions in the Competitive RFAs supersede the general information provided in the CFDA database. NIFA utilizes the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP), a secure, web-based electronic payment and information system that allows federal agencies to administer funds. Currently, ASAP is the only payment source for new NIFA grantees.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
NIFA is transitioning to a new location for Fiscal Year 2020. NIFA's New Mailing Address AFTER September 30, 2019 follows: National Institute of Food and Agriculture 6501 Beacon Drive Kansas City, MO 64133
Headquarters Office
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader,
Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Community and Education, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250
Washington , DC 20250-2250 US
Policy@nifa.usda.gov
Phone: (202) 720-2324
Fax: (202) 720-2030
Website Address
http://nifa.usda.gov/program/tribal-college-research-grant-program
Financial Information
Account Identification
12-1500-0-1-352
Obligations
(Project Grants (Cooperative Agreements)) FY 18$3,519,957.00; FY 19 est $3,514,143.00; FY 20 est $1,644,432.00; FY 17$1,670,933.00; FY 16$1,674,391.00; - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years. This program represents no year funds.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive and/or capacity project grant, or cooperative agreement are established, these amounts will be announced in the annual Competitive Request for Application (RFA). The most current RFA is available via: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/tribal-colleges-research-grants-program-tcrgp
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
As an administrator of U.S. government support, NIFA works in partnership with grantees to ensure responsible stewardship of federal funds. Our grantees and partners are required to comply with all relevant rules and regulations. The following resources are provided to NIFA's partners and award recipients to support their adherence to federal regulations governing program performance: NIFA's primary (main) website: https://nifa.usda.gov/regulations-and-guidelines The following represent specific documents and direct links: POLICY GUIDE NIFA's Federal Assistance Policy Guide describes agency policies and procedures. https://nifa.usda.gov/policy-guide CERTIFICATIONS AND REPRESENTATIONS Certifications and representations provided through the NIFA application process. https://nifa.usda.gov/certifications-and-representations ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF USDA SUPPORT BY NIFA When acknowledging USDA support in accordance with 2 CFR Part 415, grantees must use the following acknowledgement for all projects or initiatives supported by NIFA. https://nifa.usda.gov/acknowledgment-usda-support-nifa FEDERAL REGULATIONS The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) lists all regulations published in the Federal Register. https://nifa.usda.gov/federal-regulations FOIA The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) provides that any person has the right to request access to federal documents and information such as research data. https://nifa.usda.gov/foia NEPA POLICY AND GUIDANCE The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Policy and Guidance set the standard for identifying potential environmental impacts. https://nifa.usda.gov/nepa-policy-and-guidance OGFM ISSUED CORRESPONDENCE The Office of Grants and Financial Management occasionally issues correspondence to applicants, grantees, and/or the general public for informational or clarification purposes. https://nifa.usda.gov/ogfm-issued-correspondence RESEARCH MISCONDUCT NIFA requires that all its awardees adhere to the USDA Scientific Integrity Policy and the Federal Policy on Research Misconduct. https://nifa.usda.gov/research-misconduct NIFA'S GENERAL AWARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS Award terms and conditions are determined by statutory, regulatory, and agency requirements, as well as each grant's circumstances. Terms and conditions dictate important items related to your grant, including method of payment, reporting frequency and content, and prior approval requirements. References to the terms and conditions of awards are located on the NIFA 2009 Award Fact Sheet. NIFA's general award terms and conditions (see link below) is applicable to this program, for awards with an award date on December 26, 2014 and thereafter. https://nifa.usda.gov/resource/nifa-general-terms-and-conditions-grants-and-cooperative-agreements-october-2016.
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2016 For FY 2016: Turtle Mountain Community College, Anishinabe Campus Student Research Experience. Using Biological Indicators as Measures for Water Quality Turtle Mountain Community College students will use biological indicators to measure water quality in Belcourt Lake. This project builds off of previous student research projects, which also used macroinvertebrates to evaluate water quality in Ox Creek, a waterway fed by the spill way of Belcourt Lake. The previous project found high levels of lead in sloughs north and west of Belcourt Lake. The project director expects six students to have an intensive training in research and leadership skills. An Undergraduate Research Experience to Develop Improved Forest Carbon and Biomass Models for the Salish-Kootenai & Nez Perce Inventory Programs The project supports sustainable silviculture of indigenous forests and bioenergy production. It will also train students through hands-on experiences in forestry research. The collaborators are the University of Montana’s College of Forestry and Conservation, a McIntire-Stennis institution. Tribal partners are the forestry departments of the Nez Perce, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Conservation Bison Herd Health and Well-Being This research will evaluate the effect of diet, parasites and disease on the reproductive fitness of Fort Peck Tribe’s bison herds. The Fort Peck Tribe’s Yellowstone conservation herd had a calving rate of essentially 100 percent in 2015. However, in the same year, the tribe’s commercial herd’s calving rate was only 75 percent. This study whether herd health is the deciding factor in the calving rates. The project director reports that the Fort Peck Tribes conservation herd offers a rare opportunity to conduct this evidence-based research, as its genetics are devoid of cattle DNA introgression. The work will be conducted with direct involvement of three Fort Peck Community College students supervised by faculty from that institution. Plant Phenology as an Indicator of Forest Community Resilience and Adaptive Capacity This research will evaluate how climate changes affects how plants emerge, flower, produce seed and go dormant. Observing changes in plant life cycles and their reproductive fitness could provide strong indicators of changing climate conditions and assist natural resource managers in responding to change. In particular, this project will identify which plant species can provide “early warning” indicators of climate change in Northeastern Wisconsin. New Discovery: Atmospheric Mercury Loading In The St. Louis River Watershed And Potential Correlation With Dragonfly Bioaccumulation The project director will guide students as they measure the mercury deposition in the St. Louis River watershed. Students will test for correlation between dry deposition and bioaccumulation of mercury in dragonfly larvae. The data will help tribal natural resource managers and health officials to protect those who rely on the watershed’s fish and plant life food. This student, which builds on previous student research, is also timely in that recent studies find that one in ten infants on the North Shore of Lake Superior have unsafe levels of mercury in their blood. Turtle Mountain Community College, Anishinabe Campus Student Research Experience. Using Biological Indicators as Measures for Water Quality Turtle Mountain Community College students will use biological indicators to measure water quality in Belcourt Lake. This project builds off of previous student research projects, which also used macroinvertebrates to evaluate water quality in Ox Creek, a waterway fed by the spill way of Belcourt Lake. The previous project found high levels of lead in sloughs north and west of Belcourt Lake. The project director expects six (6) students to have an intensive training in research and leadership skills. An Undergraduate Research Experience to Develop Improved Forest Carbon and Biomass Models for the Salish-Kootenai & Nez Perce Inventory Programs The project supports sustainable silviculture of indigenous forests and bioenergy production. It will also train students through hands-on experiences in forestry research. The collaborators are the University of Montana’s College of Forestry and Conservation, a McIntire-Stennis institution. Tribal partners are the forestry departments of the Nez Perce, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Conservation Bison Herd Health and Well-Being This research will evaluate the effect of diet, parasites and disease on the reproductive fitness of Fort Peck Tribe’s bison herds. The Fort Peck Tribe’s Yellowstone conservation herd had a calving rate of essentially 100 percent in 2015. However, in the same year, the tribe’s commercial herd’s calving rate was only 75 percent. This study whether herd health is the deciding factor in the calving rates. The project director reports that the Fort Peck Tribes conservation herd offers a rare opportunity to conduct this evidence-based research, as its genetics are devoid of cattle DNA introgression. The work will be conducted with direct involvement of three (3) Fort Peck Community College students supervised by faculty from that institution. Plant Phenology as an Indicator of Forest Community Resilience and Adaptive Capacity This research will evaluate how climate changes affects how plants emerge, flower, produce seed and go dormant. Observing changes in plant life cycles and their reproductive fitness could provide strong indicators of changing climate conditions and assist natural resource managers in responding to change. In particular, this project will identify which plant species can provide “early warning” indicators of climate change in Northeastern Wisconsin. New Discovery: Atmospheric Mercury Loading In The St. Louis River Watershed And Potential Correlation With Dragonfly Bioaccumulation The project director will guide students as they measure the mercury deposition in the St. Louis River watershed. Students will test for correlation between dry deposition and bioaccumulation of mercury in dragonfly larvae. The data will help tribal natural resource managers and health officials to protect those who rely on the watershed’s fish and plant life food. This study, which builds on previous student research, is also timely in that recent studies find that one (1) in ten (10) infants on the North Shore of Lake Superior have unsafe levels of mercury in their blood.
Fiscal Year 2017 1. Building A Community-Based Research Plan At Tohono O’odham Community College This two-year, Pathways to Research proposal will support a partnership with University of Arizona and meetings to develop an Indigenous Research program at the college. Project directors will reach out to students and the greater community to learn about what they would support in a new research program that is adapted to the needs of the Tohono O`odham Reservation. 2. IAIA Student Agricultural Research Project Phase II This two-year Student Research project builds on a previous program to provide arts students with an opportunity to study science. Working with New Mexico State University, IAIA will train students in agriculture research methods applicable to farms along the Rio Grande and Pecos River corridors. This will enhance science literacy among all participants and may engage a few students in a new academic career. 3. Implementing Interdisciplinary Experiential Learning at a Tribal College This two-year Capacity project will focus on building new collaborations with North Dakota State University. The project will investigate the potential of equine assisted learning as a means to address the community concerns about loss of culture and low academic achievement among reservation youth. 4. Effectiveness of sub-irrigation in the Milk River floodplain, Montana This two-year, New Discovery project will investigate whether a sub-irrigation system can address the agricultural needs of in semi-arid regions of northcentral Montana. The Aaniiih Nakoda College community garden will serve as a demonstration plot for this new tool to manage soil moisture and nutrient management. The project director also hopes to attract more students to the environmental science program with the project. Montana State University-Bozeman will partner with the college on this research. 5. Strengthening Little Big Horn College Research Capacity through Improving Rural Families` Access to Safe Drinking Water This two year, New Discovery project, a partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, seeks to apply archeology to develop a more sustainable agriculture on the Menominee reservation. The project builds on three tribal research capacity grants and will explore Menominee agricultural practices from 750 to 1650 AD to gain insights on systems that could benefit modern agriculture during times of climate change. Thirty students will benefit from this project, including ten student interns, qualifying it for the enhanced student funding option.
Fiscal Year 2018 Fiscal Year (FY) 2018: (A) TRIBAL COLLEGES RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM (TCRGP) 1. Ecological Restoration of Native Plant Communities in Forest and Woodlands on the Navajo Nation. The proposal titled, "Ecological restoration of native plant communities in forests and woodlands on the Navajo Nation" is a new application submitted as a New Discovery-Enhanced, applied research project. The overall proposal to the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Tribal Colleges Research Grants Program is a partnership between Diné College (lead) and Northern Arizona University. The overall goal is to carry out experiments in ecological restoration in and near Tsaile, Arizona. 2. FOOD AND WATER SYSTEMS RESILIENCY ON THE KICKAPOO TRIBE IN KANSAS RESERVATION This project continues and expands on the work of a NIFA-funded project designed to enhance existing gardening initiatives on one local Native American reservation, and provide agriculture science education to Native American students within the tribal community The primary research objective of this project is to establish the benefits and costs of irrigation for small scale vegetable production on the Kickapoo reservation in northeast Kansas. 3. LANDSCAPE IMPACTS ON MERCURY CYCLING IN THE ST. LOUIS RIVER WATERSHED Landscape Impacts on Mercury Cycling in the St. Louis River Watershed is a new application under the Tribal College Research Grants Program This New Discovery research project fulfills the Community College's Environmental Institute mission and provides research that helps tribal authorities address the impact of mercury on both Fond du Lac community and natural resources in the St. Louis River watershed.Our 1862 Land Grant Partner is the Unviersity of Minnesota. 4. CONTROL OF ANNUAL INVASIVE GRASSES IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN INTERMOUNTAIN MONTANE GRASSLANDS WITH ESPLANADE (INDAZIFLAM) HERBICIDE AND NO-TILL SEEDING Control of Annual Invasive Grasses in Rocky Mountain Intermountain Montane Grasslands with Esplanade (Indaziflam) Herbicide and No-till SeedingVentenata (Ventenata dubia) represents a significant threat to western Montana rangelands. Ventenata is found in sites infested with medusahead wildrye (Taeaniatherum caput-medusae) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) forming a ventenata-medusahead-cheatgrass (VMC) winter annual invasive grass complex. 5. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AND STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR FORT PECK INTER-TRIBAL BUFFALO TREATY IMPLEMENTATION This New application addresses the Capacity Building Applied Faculty/Community Research option. Faculty and staff of Fort Peck Community College and MSU have since 2013 engaged the people of the Fort Peck Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes with the Tribes' restored heritage buffalo to improve community well-being. This project will investigate and advance 10 Tribal programs' commitments to the Inter-Tribal Buffalo Treaty residents have actually seen them due to their remoteness from population centers). (B) TRIBAL COLLEGE RESEARCH AREA OF EXPERTISE (TCRAE) 1. Enhancing Native American Education and Land Management through Research, Collaboration and Training on Remote Sensing of Southwest Rangelands Our proposed project establishes at the Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute a “Tribal College Research Area of Expertise” on applications of geospatial technology for monitoring and analysis of Southwest rangelands. The research will develop and test a methodological foundation for an observation-based, spatial data and information system that would support improved rangeland management in the Southwestern United States. 2. Establishing Best Practices to Maximize Yield of the Culturally Relevant Amelanchier (Juneberry) The proposed new research project has been conducting for over 15 years. The Juneberry Project was initiated and continues at the request of Tribal Elders and has included guidance and support from the Tribal communities on Fort Berthold Indian Reservation throughout all aspects of its existence. The project will enhance the ongoing project with data on "Best Practices", equipment, and curriculum materials to ensure maximum yield of the extremely nutritious and culturally important Juneberry while working with South Dakota State University (SDSU). 3.From Ecology to Economy: Assessing the Health of Bat Populations and Examining their Importance to North Dakota Agriculture To meet the needs of increasing STEM capacity at Tribal Colleges, promote natural resource management, and prepare Native American students in STEM fields, United Tribes Technical College (UTTC), collaboratively with North Dakota State University (NDSU), aims to meet four goals for the BATS III project that are aligned with the common goals of the land-grant institutions 4. Identifying Drought Tolerant Pinyon Pines (Pinus edulis) on the Navajo Nation using LIDAR and Hyperspectral Imaging Pinyon pines are a culturally and ecologically important species across much of the southwestern US including the Navajo Nation. They have experienced widespread mortality due to recent drought in the region, and active mitigation, such as restoration planting, may be required to maintain trees in areas they have historically occupied. Furthermore, understanding the extent of future pinyon mortality due to drought will depend on estimating the number of drought tolerant pinyons on the Navajo Nation landscape. Recent research demonstrates that individual pinyons vary dramatically in their ability to survive extreme drought and to grow and reproduce during prolonged drought. In addition, drought tolerance traits are passed to their offspring and associated with particular beneficial soil microbes. However, drought tolerant trees cannot always be readily recognized on the landscape so that appropriate seed stock can be collected. Here, we propose to combine measures of drought tolerance (growth, physiology, soil microbial communities) with cutting edge advancements in LIDAR and hyperspectral imaging to develop a spectral signal of drought tolerance that can eventually be used to identify drought tolerant pinyons at the landscape scale.
Fiscal Year 2019 Fiscal Year (FY) 2019: (A) TRIBAL COLLEGES RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM (TCRGP) The projected FY 2019 will be the same as FY 2018. (B) TRIBAL COLLEGE RESEARCH AREA OF EXPERTISE (TCRAE) The projected FY 2019 will be the same as FY 2018.
Fiscal Year 2020 Fiscal Year (FY) 2020: (A) TRIBAL COLLEGES RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM (TCRGP) The projected FY 2020 will be the same as FY 2019. Pertinent information will be provided by Program at a future date. (B) TRIBAL COLLEGE RESEARCH AREA OF EXPERTISE (TCRAE) The projected FY 2020 will be the same as FY 2019.