Agricultural and Rural Economic Research, Cooperative Agreements and Collaborations

 

To provide economic and other social science information and analysis for public and private decisions on agriculture, food, natural resources, and rural America. ERS produces such information for use by the general public and to help the executive and legislative branches develop, administer, and evaluate agricultural and rural policies and programs.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
10.250
Federal Agency/Office
Agency: Department of Agriculture
Office: Economic Research Service
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
Cooperative Agreements; DISSEMINATION OF TECHNICAL INFORMATION; Project Grants
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2014: ERS research on the farm and rural economy found the following:
--Rural employment loss and recovery during and after the Great Recession varied widely across rural counties
--While production more than doubled from 2000 to 2010 in three emerging energy industries—shale gas, wind power, and corn-based ethanol—employment effects in the local and regional economies varied, with the greatest impact from gas production
--While farm business debt rose from 1992 to 2011, the average farm debt-to-asset ratio declined over the period, as did the share of highly leverage farm businesses
--ERS farm income indicators and forecasts measure the financial performance of the U.S. farm sector
--Rural wealth creation offers a way to achieve sustainable economic growth through a variety of development strategies based on community and regional assets

ERS research and analysis of U.S. agricultural markets found the following:
--ERS published multiple products providing highlights and economic implications of the new programs and provisions of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (2014 Farm Bill)
--About half of total cropland is now planted to genetically engineered (GE) corn, cotton, and soybeans. The adoption of insecticide-resistant (Bt) seeds has led to higher yields and net returns, while outcomes for adoption of herbicide-tolerant (HT) varieties are more mixed
--Discrepancies or “non-convergence” between futures and cash prices in wheat, corn, and soybean markets in the mid-to-late 2000s were primarily associated with contract design and market conditions rather than financial speculation
--ERS provided new information on pollinator markets
--Data from the 2010 Agricultural Management Resource Survey (ARMS) show considerable variation in corn yields, cropping practices, costs, and returns
--Risk management programs that lock in a fixed margin between dairy prices and feed costs show the potential to reduce downside risks for dairy producers
--ERS provided a new breakout of dairy industry commercial sales
--ERS analysis on the costs incurred by farmers prior to planting helps the USDA Risk Management Agency (RMA) establish prevented planting insurance premiums and indemnities
--ERS conducted a comprehensive study on the scope of, and trends in, local and regional foods

ERS research on climate change found the following:
--Consumer and producer welfare will be reduced over the next several decades if temperatures rise as suggested by several climate change scenarios
--Climate disruptions to agricultural production have increased in the past 40 years and by several possible climate change scenarios suggest increasingly negative impacts on most crop and livestock production in the U.S. by mid-century

ERS research on conservation, water, and environmental issues found the following:
--Conservation payments can encourage farming practices that improve environmental quality, but their efficacy varies by type of practice and program design
--The cost of achieving water quality goals under EPA’s 2010 Total Maximum Daily Load limits for the Chesapeake Bay depends heavily on which policy choices are selected and how they are implemented
--Implementation of the Evidence and Innovation Agenda is moving forward as interagency research teams cooperate to develop experiments to test existing and new approaches to program delivery
--Pesticide use—including the use of herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides—tripled from 1960 to 1981, but has since trended downward to 516 million pounds in 2008

ERS research on technological innovation and investment found the following:
--World population and income increases will drive future demand for agriculture, but impacts on prices and land use depend largely on the rate of agricultural productivity growth

ERS research on the organic sector found the following:
--Although ERS analysis finds that the net returns for organic crops may exceed those from conventionally grown crops such as corn, organic production has not kept pace with demand

ERS research on global food security found the following:
--Food security is projected to improve for most developing countries
--ERS finds that new policies in India improved domestic food security but did not shelter poor residents from all market shocks in the late 2000s

ERS research on global agricultural markets found the following:
--USDA Agricultural Projections to 2023 suggest long run increases in global consumption, world trade, and agricultural commodity prices
--A proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) could spur growth in U.S. agricultural exports in Asia-Pacific markets, including a diverse array of US agricultural exports to Japan and Vietnam
--China’s average corn yield is roughly 40 percent less than the U.S. average. Fiscal Year 2015: ERS research explores how investments in rural people, business, and communities affect the capacity of rural economies to prosper in the new and changing global marketplace. The agency analyzes how demographic trends, employment opportunities and job training, Federal policies, and public investment in infrastructure and technology enhance economic opportunity and quality of life for rural Americans. Equally important is ERS’s commitment to help enhance the quality of life for the Nation’s small farmers who increasingly depend on these rural economies for employment and economic support.

ERS continues to monitor changing economic and demographic trends in rural America, particularly the implications of these changes for the employment, education, income, and housing patterns of low-income rural populations. The rural development process is complex and sensitive to a wide range of factors that, to a large extent, are unique to each rural community. Nonetheless, ERS assesses general approaches to development to determine when, where, and under what circumstances rural development strategies will be most successful.

ERS research and analysis provide insight into market conditions facing U.S. agriculture, avenues for innovation, and market expansion to help farmers and ranchers manage risk. ERS produces USDA’s estimates of farm income. In addition, the ERS program identifies and analyzes market structure and technological developments that affect efficiency and profitability.

The ERS climate change research program develops models and other analytical techniques to predict responses of farmers to greenhouse gas mitigation options, analyze the impact of mitigation options on domestic and global agricultural markets and land and water use, and evaluate adaptation by farmers to a new climate regime through use of alternative technologies. The ERS climate change research program builds on extensive expertise on the economics of land use and land management, technology adoption, conservation program design, economics of biofuels, and value and dissemination of public investment in research and development.

In addition, ERS is continuing to contribute to USDA’s efforts to improve the science behind Federal environmental, water and air quality regulations and programs. As part of its analysis of environmental regulations and conservation incentive policies, ERS research continues to provide insight into developing policies for controlling nonpoint source pollution. More generally, ERS research analyzes the economic efficiency, environmental effectiveness, and distributional implications of alternative designs of resource, conservation, environmental, and commodity programs and their linkages.

ERS conducts research on technological innovation in agriculture, the economic performance, structure and viability of the farm sector and of different types of farms, and the state of global food security. ERS effectively communicates research findings to policy makers, program managers, and those shaping the public debate. The research program identifies key economic issues and uses sound analytical techniques to understand the immediate and broader economic and social consequences of alternative policies and programs related to the sustainability and use of biotechnology in U.S. agriculture, including policies to promote trade of U.S. products.

ERS has a broad program of work examining the production and marketing characteristics of the U.S. organic sector. Ongoing activities include research on the adoption of certified organic farming systems across the U.S., analysis of consumer demand and prices in specific markets, and several nationwide surveys of organic producers and markets.

The ERS research program includes an ongoing assessment of global food security. ERS provides research, analysis, and information on food security, including factors affecting food production and ability to import food, in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Commonwealth of Independent States to decision makers in the United States and throughout the world. An annual report provides an up-to-date assessment of global food security. Fiscal Year 2016: ERS research explores how investments in rural people, business, and communities affect the capacity of rural economies to prosper in the new and changing global marketplace. The agency analyzes how demographic trends, employment opportunities, Federal policies, and public investment in infrastructure and technology enhance economic opportunity and quality of life for rural Americans. Equally important is ERS’s commitment to help enhance the quality of life for the Nation’s small farmers who increasingly depend on these rural economies for employment and economic support, as well as to analyze new developments in the linkages between these farmers, consumers, and local economies.

ERS continues to monitor changing economic and demographic trends in rural America, particularly the implications of these changes for the employment, education, income, and housing patterns of low-income rural populations. The rural development process is complex and sensitive to a wide range of factors that, to a large extent, are unique to each rural community. Nonetheless, ERS assesses general approaches to development to determine when, where, and under what circumstances rural development strategies will be most successful.

ERS research and analysis provide insight into market conditions facing U.S. agriculture, avenues for innovation, and market expansion to help farmers and ranchers manage risk. ERS produces USDA’s estimates of farm income. In addition, the ERS program identifies and analyzes market structure and technological developments that affect efficiency and profitability, and examines developments in the linkages.
Authorization
FY 2012 Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, Public Law 109-97, 7 U.S.C. 292, 411, 427, 1441a, 1621-1627, 1704, 1761-68, 2201, 2202, 3103, 3291, 3311, 3504; 22 U.S.C. 3101; 42 U.S.C. 1891-93; 44 U.S.C. 3501-11; 50 U.S.C. 2061 et seq, 2251 et seq.
7CFR 3019, 7CFR Part 3015, 7CFR Part 3016, 7USC 3318b.
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
Any individual or organization in the U.S. and U.S. Territories is eligible to receive the popular or technical research publications that convey the research results, although there may be a fee.
Beneficiary Eligibility
Any individual or organization in the U.S. and U.S. Territories is eligible to receive the popular or technical research publications that convey the research results, although there may be a fee.
Credentials/Documentation
No Credentials or documentation are required. This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
Preapplication coordination is not applicable. Environmental impact information is not required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Requests for technical information may be made to the Chief, Publishing and Communications Branch, Economic Research Service (ERS), 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Mailstop 1800, Washington, DC 20520-1800.
Award Procedure
None.
Deadlines
Not Applicable.
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
Not Applicable.
Appeals
Not Applicable.
Renewals
Not Applicable.
How are proposals selected?
Not Applicable.
How may assistance be used?
ERS performs economic research and analyses related to U.S. and world agriculture that addresses a multitude of economic concerns and decision making needs of Federal, State, and local governments, farmers, farm organizations, farm suppliers, marketers, processors, and consumers. There are no restrictions on the use of ERS produced information.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
Progress reports, financial reports, financial statements, and inventions and subawards reports. The frequency of reports is outlined in the terms of the agreement. No cash reports are required. No progress reports are required. No expenditure reports are required. No performance monitoring is required.
Auditing
In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503.
Records
Financial records, supporting documents, statistical records, and all other records pertinent to an award shall be retained for a period of 3 years from the date of submission of the final expenditure report or, for awards that are renewed quarterly or annually, from the date of the submission of the quarterly or annual financial report, as authorized by the Federal awarding agency.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
This program has no statutory formula.
This program has no matching requirements.
This program does not have MOE requirements. none.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
none. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: None.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
None.
Headquarters Office
Nancy A. Thomas 355 E Street SW, Room 5-254, Washington, District of Columbia 20024-3231 Email: NThomas@ers.usda.gov Phone: 2026945008
Website Address
http://www.ers.usda.gov
Financial Information
Account Identification
12-1701-0-1-352.
Obligations
(Cooperative Agreements) FY 14 $1,313,236; FY 15 est $1,744,721; and FY 16 est $2,494,000. (Project Grants) FY 14 $125,000; FY 15 est $60,000; and FY 16 est $200,000
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
No Data Available.
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
Not Applicable.
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2014: --Evolving Production Practices and Costs in Cattle and Poultry Production
--Commodity Data Processing and Enhanced Procedures for Farm Sector Forecasts
--The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and U.S. Agricultural Trade
--How Will Farming Be Organized?
--The Changing Composition and Destination for U.S. Agricultural Exports
--NORC Data Enclave Access to Study What Drives Conversion from Conventional to Organic Agriculture
--Measures of environmental impacts from land use change and land management
--Thin Market Issues in Livestock Markets (Livestock Mandatory Price Reporting)
--Food Security Model Development: Consumption by Income Groups in Selected Food-Insecure Countries
--Price Discovery in Modern Agricultural Markets
--International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium (IATRC)
--Farm Risk Management. The Economics of Risk Management in Agriculture: Improving Our ---Understanding of How Farmers Manage Their Risk Exposure
--Exploring the Role of Tillage Experience in Continuous No-till Adoption
--SNAP and the Rural Economy
--The Evolving Role of Food Sourced Outside the Home on Diet Quality in the United States
--Assessing the Risk Reduction Impacts of the Dairy Producer Margin Protection Program: A Simulation Analysis
--Practical Issues in Empirical Analysis of National Level Farm Risk
--The Evolution and current structure of federal crop insurance and the crop insurance sector
--Domestic Commodity Support: Usage by Households, Credit Implications, and Economic Impacts
--International Agricultural Trade: Policies, Issues, and Development of Models and Long-Term Projection
--CRP Land Management and Pollinator Health Linkages in the upper Midwest Region of the U.S.
--Challenges to Managed Pollinator Health: Welfare Implications of Changes to Pollination Service Fees Stemming from Bee Health Problems
--Impacts of Farm Policies on Rice and Cotton Farms under Heterogeneity
--Farms and Networks: Mapping Administrative Farms to Farm-Level Decision-Making Units
--Food Security, Nutrition and Dietary Patterns
--Economic Evaluation of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA)
--Credit, Savings, and Insurance in Agricultural Risk Management: Theory and Empirical Evidence
--Effects of Farm and Off-Farm Income on Leverage of Farm Operator Households
--Developing a Framework for Measuring the Value of Consumer Confidence in the Food Supply
--Evaluating the Rural Economic Impacts of Local Food System Activity
--Pricing, Competition, and Concentration in the U.S. Farm Input Sector
--Field Experiments with Program Agencies
--Advanced Computational Methods using GAMS
--Influence of Food Environment on Consumer Behavior and Health Status
--Towards an Understanding of Supply Chains in Agriculture
--Firm Dynamics in the Agricultural Services Sector: Evidence from the Longitudinal Business Database
--Designing U.S. Labor Market Areas
--Measuring Food Security: Alternative Approaches and New Frontiers
--USDA Center for Behavioral and Experimental Agri-Environmental Policy Research (C-BEAR)
--Design of Microbial Food Safety Practices Grower and Packer Survey Instruments. Fiscal Year 2015: --The Changing Composition and Destination for U.S. Agricultural Exports Project
--Enhancement of procedures & documentation of farm sector forecasts & estimates & implementation of new imputation methods for missing data The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and U.S. Agricultural Trade
--Domestic Policy Modeling in the United States and European Union Agricultural Sector
--Food Security Model Development: Consumption by Income Groups in Selected Food-Insecure Countries
--Assessing the Risk Reduction Impacts of the Dairy Producer Margin Protection Program: A Simulation Analysis
--Domestic Commodity Support: Usage by Households, Credit Implications, and Economic Impacts
--Practical Issues in Empirical Analysis of National Level Farm Risk
--The Evolution and current structure of federal crop insurance and the crop insurance sector
--CRP Land Management and Pollinator Health Linkages in the upper Midwest Region of the U.S.
--International Agricultural Trade: Policies, Issues, and Development of Models and Long-Term Projection
--Challenges to Managed Pollinator Health: Welfare Implications of Changes to Pollination Service Fees Stemming from Bee Health Problems
--Impacts of Farm Policies on Rice and Cotton Farms under Heterogeneity
--Food Security, Nutrition and Dietary Patterns
--Developing a Framework for Measuring the Value of Consumer Confidence in the Food Supply
--Towards an Understanding of Supply Chains in Agriculture
--Measuring Food Security: Alternative Approaches and New Frontiers
--Design of Microbial Food Safety Practices Grower and Packer Survey Instruments
--The Food Insecurity Experience Scale and Household/Individual Correlates of Food Insecurity
--What Drives Uncertainty and Volatility Expectations in Agricultural Markets?
--Regulatory Convergence in Regional Trade Agreements: Quantifying the Gains to U.S. Agricultural Trade""
--The Evolving Role of Food Sourced Outside the Home on Diet Quality in the United States, 1977—2010
--Applying Behavioral and Experimental Economics to Food and Agri-Environmental Issues
--Evaluating the Rural Economic Impacts of Local Food System Activity
--Field Experiments with Program Agencies
--Conservation Policy Analysis using Administrative Data: The Case of Conservation Compliance
--Nudging in the Face of Risk and Ambiguity Aversion: Adopting Cover Cropts to Reduce Nutrient Pollution
--Using Satellite Data to Measure the Spillover Effects of Payments for Conservation Tillage
--Agricultural Productivity and Farm Size in Brazil
--Agricultural Productivity and Farm Size in Selected East and Southern African Countries: Uganda, Tanzania and Malawi
--Analysis of Global Food Demand
--Council on Food, Agricultural & Resource Economics
--International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium (IATRC)
--Economic Evaluation of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). Fiscal Year 2016: ERS will identify key economic issues related to rural economic development, farm viability, rural household prosperity and well-being, and competitiveness. ERS will use sound analytical techniques to understand the immediate and broader economic and social consequences of how alternative policies and programs and changing market conditions affect rural and farm economies and households. ERS will effectively communicate research results to policy makers, program managers, and those shaping the public debate on rural economic conditions and performance of all sizes and types of farms.

ERS will identify key economic issues related to interactions among natural resources, environmental quality, and the agriculture production system. ERS also will use sound analytical techniques to understand the immediate and broader economic and social consequences of alternative policies and programs to protect and enhance environmental quality associated with agriculture. ERS research analyzes the economic effects and cost effectiveness of resource, conservation, environmental, and commodity programs and their linkages. Topics include USDA's conservation programs and environmental policies addressing water and air quality and climate change associated with agricultural production.
ERS will effectively communicate research results to policy makers, program managers, and those shaping public debate on agricultural resource use and environmental quality.

ERS will be actively working through interagency activities with USDA APHIS and researchers associated with the DHS Science and Technology Directorate’s Foreign Animal Disease and the Economic Consequences Working Group. ERS analysts will continue to serve on the Department of Homeland Security Interagency Bioterrorism Risk Assessment Working Group for the National Biodefense Analysis Countermeasures and Biological Threat Characterization Centers, and will continue to serve on review committees for the Bioterrorism Risk Assessments (BTRA). The collaborative efforts of ERS researchers provide BTRA stakeholders with credible and impartial analytic support to inform biodefense investments. These efforts directly support the USDA goal to help America promote agricultural production and biotechnology exports, as America works to increase food security.

 



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