Grants for Agricultural Research, Special Research Grants

To carry out research, to facilitate or expand promising breakthroughs in areas of the food and agricultural sciences of importance to the nation and to facilitate or expand on-going State-Federal food and agricultural research programs.

Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
10.200
Federal Agency
Agency: Department of Agriculture
Office: National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Types of Assistance
PROJECT GRANTS
Uses and Use Restrictions
Grant funds must be used for allowable costs necessary to conduct approved fundamental and applied research, extension and education objectives to address food and agricultural sciences. Awards are generally limited to high priority problems of a regional or national scope. NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities.

Funds may not be used for any purposes other than those approved in the grant award documents.

Funds shall not be used for tuition remission.

Indirect Costs are generally not allowable for this program.

Generally, there are no matching requirements associated with Special Research Grant programs and matching resources will not be factored into the review process as evaluation criteria.

Please refer to RFA, Part IV.D. – Applications – Funding Restrictions for specific details.
Exceptions to the general rules, as related to Indirect Cost and matching requirements, are indicated below, as deemed appropriate and necessary.

The following programs are EXCEPTIONS to the general rules:
(1) Critical Agricultural Materials (Pub. L. 95-592)
(2) Federal Administration - Research
(3) Pest Management Alternatives (aka PMAP)
(4) Supplemental and Alternative Crops [ 7 U.S.C. 3319d (c)].
(5) Policy Research Centers (Section 1419A of 7 U.S.C. 3155) and
(6) Rangeland Research

For the above-referenced EXCEPTIONS to the general rule, [i.e. #'s (1) thru (5)], the following provisions are applicable:

Section 720 of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2012 (Pub.L. No. 112-55) limits indirect costs to 30 percent of the total Federal funds provided under each award. Therefore, when preparing budgets, applicants should limit their requests for recovery of indirect costs to the lesser of their institution’s official negotiated indirect cost rate or the equivalent of 30 percent of total Federal funds awarded. Therefore, when preparing budgets, applicants should limit their requests for recovery of indirect costs to the lesser of their institution’s official negotiated indirect cost rate or the equivalent of 30 percent of total Federal funds awarded.

Special Note on Indirect Costs as in-kind matching contributions:
Indirect costs may be claimed under the Federal portion of the award budget or, alternatively, indirect costs may be claimed as a matching contribution (if no indirect costs are requested under the Federal portion of the award budget). However, unless explicitly authorized in the RFA, indirect costs may not be claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution, unless the total claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institution’s negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. An awardee may split the allocation between the Federal and non-Federal portions of the budget only if the total amount of indirect costs charged to the project does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institution’s negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. For example, if an awardees' indirect costs are capped at 30 percent pursuant to FY 2012 appropriated funds, Section 720 of the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012 (Division A of Pub. L. 112-55), the awardee may request 15 percent of the indirect costs on both the Federal portion of the award and as a matching contribution. Or, the awardee may request any similar percentage that, when combined, does not exceed the maximum indirect cost rate of 30 percent.

Exception # 6:
For the Rangeland Research program the following provisions are applicable:
Per 7 CFR 3401.5, Indirect Cost is allowable if the award is made to a Federal lab.
Pursuant to Section 1480 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 as amended [7 USC 3333(b)(1)], applicants are required to provide 50 percent matching funds from non-federal sources for all proposed Federal funds sought in the application. Non-federal matching contributions, such as cash and third party in kind, are accepted under this program as qualified by 7 USC 3015 and 7 USC 3019. Foregone indirect costs cannot be used as part of the required match. Fully discretionary.
Authorization
Section 2 (c), Public Law 89-106, 7 U.S.C. 450i(c), as amended.
Eligibility Requirements
Applicant Eligibility
Special Research Grants: State agricultural experiment stations, all colleges and universities, other research institutions and organizations, Federal agencies, private organizations or corporations and individuals having a demonstrable capacity to conduct research activities to facilitate or expand promising breakthroughs in areas of the food and agricultural sciences of importance to the United States.
Beneficiary Eligibility
For Special Research Grants: State agricultural experiment stations, all colleges and universities, other research institutions and organizations, Federal agencies, private organizations or corporations and individuals having a demonstrable capacity to conduct research activities to facilitate or expand promising breakthroughs in areas of the food and agricultural sciences of importance to the United States.
Credentials/Documentation
Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM) - each applicant (unless excepted under 2 CFR § 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal awarding agency under 2 CFR § 25.110(d)) is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal awarding agency. It also must state that the Federal awarding agency may not make a Federal award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Federal awarding agency is ready to make a Federal award, the Federal awarding agency may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a Federal award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant.
Applicants must furnish the information required in the request for applications (RFAs). Successful applicants recommended for funding must furnish the information and assurances requested during the award documentation process. These include, but are not limited to the following:
Organizational Management Information - Specific management information relating to an applicant shall be submitted on a one time basis, with updates on an as needed basis, as part of the responsibility determination prior to the award of a grant identified under this RFA, if such information has not been provided previously under this or another NIFA program. NIFA will provide copies of forms recommended for use in fulfilling these requirements as part of the preaward process. Although an applicant may be eligible based on its status as one of these entities, there are factors which may exclude an applicant from receiving Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits under this program (e.g., debarment or suspension of an individual involved or a determination that an applicant is not responsible based on submitted organizational management information). This information collection is approved under OMB Circular Control No. 0524-0026, “Assurance of Compliance with the Department of Agriculture Regulations Assuring Civil Rights, Compliance and Organization Information.”

SPECIAL NOTE:
See CFDA Section # 093 for further details. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.
Application and Award Process
Preapplication Coordination
All RFAs are published on the Agency’s website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. Please see the following Grants.gov link for more information: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp. An environmental impact statement is required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Applications should be submitted as outlined in the RFA. Applications must follow the instructions provided per Grants.Gov and in the Agency guide to submitting applications via Grants.gov.
Award Procedure
Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA. Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application. Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the RFA.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.
Range of Approval/Disapproval Time
Section :094 - Deadlines:
Specific deadline dates are announced on the Agency’s website: http://www.nifa.usda.gov
Contact the headquarters, as appropriate, for application deadlines. See Section : 152 for specific details.

Further, dates for specific deadlines are announced in the RFA each fiscal year.

Section :095 - Range of Approval/Disapproval Time:
From 30 to 180 days.
Appeals
2 CFR Part 200 – Subparts D & E apply to this program.
Renewals
Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA) each fiscal year.
Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
This program has no statutory formula.
This program has no matching requirements. Funds are awarded competitively. No formula grants are awarded under Subtitle K of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 [7 U.S.C. 3319e]. Generally, NIFA does NOT require matching or cost sharing support for this program. However, the Rangeland Research Program is an EXCEPTION to the general rule. The following represents pertinent information regarding the Rangeland Research Program [ 7 U.S.C. 3333(a)(1)]: Pursuant to Section 1480 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 as amended [7 USC 3333(b)(1)], applicants are required to provide 50 percent matching funds from non-federal sources for all proposed Federal funds sought in the application.
Non-federal matching contributions, such as cash and third party in kind, are accepted under this program as qualified by 7 USC 3015 and 7 USC 3019.
MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
The term of competitive project grants and/or cooperative agreements under this program may not exceed three (3) years. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: by letter of credit.
Post Assistance Requirements
Reports
Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFA’s electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Cash reports are not applicable. (Specific details regarding Progress Reports are provided above.). A final “Financial Status Report” (SF-269) or “Federal Financial Report” (SF-425) is due within 90 days of the expiration date of the grant and should be submitted to the Awards Management Branch, Office of Extramural Programs at the address listed below, in accordance with instructions contained in 2 CFR 3430.55 (also refer to Section 3015.82 of the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations).

Awards Management Division
Office of Grants and Financial Management
National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)
U.S. Department of Agriculture
STOP 2271
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20250-2271
Telephone: (202) 401-4986. (Specific details regarding Performance Monitoring Reports are provided above.).
Audits
In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, Subpart F—Audit Requirements nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more during the non-Federal entity’s fiscal year in Federal awards must have a single or program-specific audit conducted for that year in accordance with the provisions of this part. A non-Federal entity that expends less than $750,000 during the non-Federal entity’s fiscal year in Federal awards is exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in § 200.503. Relation to other audit requirements, but records must be available for review or audit by appropriate officials of the Federal agency, pass-through entity, and Government Accountability Office (GAO).
Records
In accordance with 2 CFR Part 400 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, § 200.333 Retention requirements for records. Grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three (3) year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved.

2 CFR Part 200, Subpart D applies to this program.
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2014: For Fiscal Year 2014:

(A) Expert IPM Decision Support Systems:

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(B) Global Change, UV-Monitoring:

For FY 2014:
The program made one non-competitive award to Colorado State University to operate and manage USDA’s ultraviolet radiation climatology network, and to conduct, in collaboration with other institutions, research on ultraviolet radiation effects on agriculturally relevant crops. Coupled with economic models, effects research and simulations will enable us to project regional and national climate change impacts on agriculture. Data collection rates will remain above 95%. Modeling efforts on corn and soybeans will continue.

(C ) Integrated Pest Management & Biological Control:

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(D) Interregional Research Project # 4 – (aka Minor Crop Pest Management and/or IR-4) Program:

For the FY 2014 award cycle, $11,115,000 was awarded. Applications were received from four regional centers and the National Headquarters Office. A diverse panel reviewed the applications and recommended funding each of the proposals received. A total of 5 awards were made. Funds support research on pesticides for use in specialty crops and minor crops.

(E) Pest Management Alternatives (PMAP):

The program was not funded in FY 2014.


(F) Other: Potato Breeding Research:

For the FY 2014 award cycle, $1,237,202 was available for this program.
A total of three applications, requesting a total of $1,406,000, have been received.
On June 13, 2014, a four-member peer review panel evaluated these applications. The peer panel includes one 1862 faculty, one 1890 faculty, one industry scientist, and one USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Program Leader.
Funds were available to support all three awards.
The funding ratio for this program in FY14 was 100 %.

Funded projects should support potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) research programs that focus on varietal development and testing and potato varieties for commercial production. Aspects of evaluation, screening and testing must support variety development.

(G) Critical Agricultural Materials:

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(H) Aquaculture Centers:

For FY 2014:

There are few new projects approved for funding at this time as many of the awards have yet to be made with the FY 2014 appropriation. Specific Aquaculture Center Plans of Work for 2014 have not been submitted to date with the exception of the Western Regional Aquaculture Center (WRAC) It is anticipated that 70 pre-proposals will be received and 10 proposals will be funded through FY 2014.

The other 4 RACs have their own websites and compile their lists of projects and accomplishments on their individual websites. These can be found through the Southern Regional Aquaculture Center’s website via the following URL: http://srac.msstate.edu/theracs.html

NIFA has received requests to approve funding for various projects funded by the Regional Aquaculture Centers which subcontract to other organizations within their respective regions. Again, these are listed on the individual Centers’ websites.


(I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops (aka Canola Research):

For the FY 2014 award cycle, $768,924 is available for this program. Maximum award size is $210,000.

A total of 8 applications requesting a total of $ 1,570,468 were received in this year’s competition. On June 19, 2014, a five-member peer review panel will evaluate these applications.

The peer panel includes faculty and administrators from 1862 and 1890 land grant universities, and practitioners from the food and agricultural sciences community.

Funds were available to support a total of 4 awards.

The funding ratio for this program in FY14 was 50 %.

Funded projects will develop canola as a viable supplemental and alternative crop in the United States; involve stakeholders in priority setting, project development and implementation; include multi-state cooperation; and complement research being conducted by the U. S. Department of Agriculture‘s Agricultural Research Service (ARS). Extension, education, and communication activities related to the research will be addressed.

(J) Policy Research Centers (aka Agriculture and Rural Policy Research):

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(K) Rangeland Research Program (aka Joe Skeen Institute and/or McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry):

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(L) Forest Products Research Program:

The program was not funded in FY 2014. Fiscal Year 2015: For Fiscal Year 2015:
(A) Expert IPM Decision Support Systems:

The program was not funded in FY 2015.

(B) Global Change, UV-Monitoring:

For FY 2015:

The program made one non-competitive award to Colorado State University to operate and manage USDA’s ultraviolet radiation climatology network, and to conduct, in collaboration with other institutions, research on ultraviolet radiation effects on agriculturally relevant crops. Coupled with economic models, effects research and simulations enable us to project regional and national climate change impacts on agriculture. The program maintained high data collection rates, and completed initial models runs for corn. Economic analysis modules have been coupled with the integrated assessment framework.

(C ) Integrated Pest Management & Biological Control:

The program was not funded in FY 2015.

(D) Interregional Research Project # 4 – (aka Minor Crop Pest Management and/or IR-4) Program:

For the FY 2015 award cycle, $11,101,925 was awarded. Applications were received from four regional centers and the National Headquarters Office. A diverse panel reviewed the applications and recommended funding each of the proposals received. A total of 5 awards were made. Funds support research on pesticides for use in specialty crops and minor crops.

(E) Pest Management Alternatives (PMAP):

The program was not funded in FY 2015.

(F) Other: Potato Breeding Research:

For the FY 2015 award cycle, $1,242,195 was available for this program.
A total of four applications, requesting a total of $1,595,750 have been received.
On June 11, 2015, a five-member peer review panel evaluated these applications. The peer panel includes four 1862 faculty and one 1890 faculty.
Funded projects should support potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) research programs that focus on varietal development and testing and potato varieties for commercial production. Aspects of evaluation, screening and testing must support variety development.

(G) Critical Agricultural Materials:

The program was not funded in FY 2015.


(H) Aquaculture Centers:

For FY 2015:

The RFA for the five Regional Aquaculture Centers was sent to the individual Center Directors with funding split equally five ways. All five proposals have been submitted to NIFA as a renewal of the previous year’s awards as per guidance from OGFM. Again, as per the Western Regional Aquaculture Center’s administrative procedures, projects awarded as subcontract were submitted along with the Administrative proposal for FY 2015 awaiting programmatic review and approval. These requests were for funding of Year 3 of previously approved projects. The other four Regional Aquaculture Centers will submit regional, multi-institutional, multi-investigator projects funded by the FY 2014-2015 awards. These projects will be reviewed and approved by the NIFA Aquaculture Program staff. Projects to be funded by the Regional Aquaculture Centers are peer reviewed internal to the region and all projects are approved by the individual Centers’ Board of Directors prior to submission and approval by NIFA.

(I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops (aka Canola Research):

For the FY 2015 award cycle, $768,924 is available for this program. Maximum award size is $210,000.

A total of 8 applications requesting a total of $ 1,496,175 was received in this year’s competition. On June 18, 2015, a five-member peer review panel has evaluated these applications.

The peer panel includes faculty from 1862 and 1890 land grant universities, an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Program Leader and an industry scientist.

(J) Policy Research Centers (aka Agriculture and Rural Policy Research):

The program was not funded in FY 2015.

(K) Rangeland Research Program (aka Joe Skeen Institute and/or McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry):

The program was not funded in FY 2015.

(L) Forest Products Research Program:

The program was not funded in FY 2015. Fiscal Year 2016: For Fiscal Year 2016:

(A) Expert IPM Decision Support Systems:

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(B) Global Change, UV-Monitoring:

For FY 2016:

The program anticipates making one competitive award to operate and manage USDA’s ultraviolet radiation climatology network, and to conduct, in collaboration with other institutions, research on ultraviolet radiation effects on agriculturally relevant crops. Furthermore, the successful applicant will be capable of projecting regional and national climate change impacts on cotton/maize/soybeans using economic models, effects research, and simulations. The program will maintain high data collection rates, and economic analysis modules will be coupled with an integrated assessment framework. The competitive process will involve site visits to highly ranked applicants.

(C ) Integrated Pest Management & Biological Control:

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(D) Interregional Research Project # 4 – (aka Minor Crop Pest Management and/or IR-4) Program:

For the FY 2016 award cycle, it is expected that approximately $11,000,000 will be available to be awarded. Applications are expected from four regional centers and the National Headquarters Office. A diverse panel will review the applications and recommend funding accordingly. A total of 5 awards may be made. Funds support research on pesticides for use in specialty crops and minor crops.

(E) Pest Management Alternatives (PMAP):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(F) Other: Potato Breeding Research:

Information is not yet available. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.

(G) Critical Agricultural Materials:

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(H) Aquaculture Centers:

For FY 2016:

Funding of the Regional Aquaculture Center Program will, again, be split equally five ways to fund regional projects germane to the aquaculture industry in the region. The focus of projects submitted from each of the Centers will be determined by industry input, reviewed for technical merit by each Center’s Technical Advisory Committee, and approved by the Centers’ Board of Directors prior to submission to NIFA.

(I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops (aka Canola Research):

Information is not yet available. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.

(J) Policy Research Centers (aka Agriculture and Rural Policy Research):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(K) Rangeland Research Program (aka Joe Skeen Institute and/or McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(L) Forest Products Research Program:

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.
Financial Information
Account Identification
12-1500-0-1-352.
Obligations
(Project Grants) FY 14 $20,417,439; FY 15 est $19,377,324; and FY 16 est $16,125,621 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years.


NOTES:
In FY 2014, various Pest Management Programs are consolidated under Integrated Activities, Crop Protection/Pest Management Program.
Obligations for the Forest Products and Potato Breeding Research Programs are reported under Other Special Research Grants.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive project grant or cooperative agreement are established, these will be announced in the annual program announcement or Request for Application (RFA).
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
The following federal statutes and regulations represent general administrative requirements which apply to NIFA federal assistance programs. These include, but are not limited to the ones listed below.

2 CFR Part 25 - Universal Identifier and Central Contractor Registration

2 CFR Part 170 - Reporting Subaward and Executive Compensation Information

2 CFR Part 175 - Award Term for Trafficking in Persons

2 CFR Part 180 and Part 417 - OMB Guidelines to Agencies on Government-Wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) and USDA Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension

2 CFR Part 182 - Governmentwide Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Financial Assistance)

2 CFR Part 200 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards

2 CFR Part 400 – USDA implementation of 2 CFR Part 200 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards

2 CFR Part 415 - General Program Administrative Regulations

2 CFR Part 416 – USDA General Program Administrative Regulations for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments

2 CFR Part 417 - Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension

2 CFR Part 418 - New Restrictions on Lobbying

2 CFR Part 421 - Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Financial Assistance)

2 CFR Part 422—Research Institutions Conducting USDA-Funded Extramural Research; Research Misconduct.

7 CFR Part 1, subpart A—USDA implementation of the Freedom of Information Act and 7 CFR Part 3404, Public Information.

7 CFR Part 1c—USDA Implementation of the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects

7 CFR Part 3—USDA implementation of OMB Circular No. A-129 regarding debt collection

7 CFR Part 15, subpart A—USDA implementation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended

7 CFR Part 331 and 9 CFR Part 121—USDA implementation of the Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002

7 CFR Part 3407—USDA procedures to implement the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended

7 CFR Part 3418—Stakeholder Input Requirements for Recipients of Agricultural Research, Education, and Extension Formula Funds

7 CFR Part 3419—Matching Funds Requirement for Agricultural Research and Extension Formula Funds at 1890 Land–Grant Institutions, Including Tuskegee University, and at 1862 Land–Grant Institutions in Insular Areas

7 CFR Part 3430—Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Financial Assistance Programs--General Award Administrative Provisions

7 CFR Part 3434—Hispanic–Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities Certification Process

29 U.S.C. 794 (section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973) and 7 CFR Part 15b (USDA implementation of statute) —prohibiting discrimination based upon physical or mental handicap in federally-assisted programs

35 U.S.C. 200 et seq. —Bayh Dole Act, controlling allocation of rights to inventions made by employees of small business firms and domestic nonprofit organizations, including universities, in federally-assisted programs (implementing regulations are contained in 37 CFR Part 401)

44 U.S.C. 3551-3558 (Pub. L. 113–283) - Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014 (FISMA). Applies to awardees if it will collect, store, process, transmit, or use information on behalf of NIFA.

Executive Order 13513, Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging while Driving (Oct. 1, 2009).

NIFA Federal Assistance Policy Guide—a compendium of basic NIFA policies and procedures that apply to all NIFA awards, unless there are statutory, regulatory, or award-specific requirements to the contrary.

In addition, the following represent Program-Specific requirements:

7 CFR Part 3400 – Special Research Grants Program (for CFDA 10.200)

7 CFR Part 3401—Rangeland Research Grants Program (CFDA 10.200)

7 CFR Part 3402—Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate and Postgraduate Fellowship Grants Program (CFDA 10.210).

7 CFR Part 3403—Small Business Innovation Research Grants Program (CFDA 10.212)

7 CFR Part 3405—Higher Education Challenge Grants Program (CFDA 10.217)

7 CFR Part 3406—1890 Institution Capacity Building Grants Program (CFDA 10.216)

7 CFR Part 3415 – Biotechnology Risk Assessment Research Grants Program (CFDA 10.219)

7 CFR Part 3431—Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (CFDA 10.313)


Information Contacts
Regional or Local Office
None. Section # 153 - Additional Websites:
http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/minor-crop-pest-management-program-interregional-research-project-4-ir-4

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/potato-breeding-research

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/special-research-grants-program-aquaculture-research

http://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/supplemental-and-alternative-crops-sacc.
Headquarters Office
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Production and Sustainablity, Division of Plant Systems-Protection, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2240, Telephone: (202) 401-4939, Fax: (202) 1782.

ADDITIONAL CONTACT:

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Bioenergy, Climate, and Environment, Division of Bioenergy, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2210, Washington, District of Columbia, 20250-2210 , Telephone: (202) 401-5244, Fax: (202) 401-2653.

E-mail: policy@nifa.usda.gov., Washington , District of Columbia 20250-2240 Email: Policy@nifa.usda.gov Phone: (202) 401-4939
Website Address
http://nifa.usda.gov/grants
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2014: For Fiscal Year 2014:

(A) Expert IPM Decision Support Systems:

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(B) Global Change, UV-Monitoring:

For FY 2014:
The USDA has long been concerned about high levels of ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, which are known to have harmful effects on agricultural crops, rangelands, forest ecosystems, humans, and livestock. The purpose of this program is to support research which:
• generates an uninterrupted stream of climatology data;
• determines mechanisms and symptoms of plant and animal response; and
• applies tightly integrated crop and climate models to assess regional and national impacts (both biological and economic) of multiple plant stressors.

(C ) Integrated Pest Management & Biological Control:

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(D) Interregional Research Project # 4 – (aka Minor Crop Pest Management and/or IR-4) Program:

Interregional Research Project No. 4 Minor Crop Pest Management

For FY 2014:

This project supports the North Central Regional IR-4 Centers at Michigan State University, Cornell University, University of Florida and University of California plus the National Headquarters Office at Rutgers University. Since the plant protection industry has little economic incentive to develop registrations for specialty crop chemicals, IR-4 develops the data that provide legal, effective, safe, and IPM-compatible pest control agents for minor and specialty crops. Without this program, many specialty crops could no longer be produced in the US or would be greatly compromised in cost and quality. This project’s objectives for minor and specialty crops are to obtain pesticide clearances for food uses, further the development and adoption of biopesticides, and conduct research to protect ornamental crops. There are five regions that can apply for IR-4 funding.

(E) Pest Management Alternatives (PMAP):

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(F) Other: Potato Breeding Research:

For FY 2014:

1) The project will develop potato cultivars for release and adoption in the North Central region; evaluate germplasm for market-limiting traits, focusing on tuber quality and pest resistance; use previously validated genetic markers to screen early generations and conduct QTL mapping studies to identify new markers for variety development; and investigate the feasibility of using genotyping-by-sequencing for QTL detection and genomic selection. The expected outcomes include commercial release of new varieties, the selection of new breeding lines for further evaluation, new markers for marker-assisted selection, and preliminary data on the feasibility of using genotyping-by-sequencing for variety development.

2) The project will develop an array of attractive, highly productive, disease- and insect-resistant potato varieties for small and large potato producers. These improved varieties will enhance marketing opportunities, farm sustainability and grower profits This project will use classical breeding and selection studies to improve potato productivity and quality for the Eastern U.S. markets.

(G) Critical Agricultural Materials:

This program was not funded in FY 2014.

(H) Aquaculture Centers:

FY 2014 awards have been processed. Projects funded with the FY 2014 funding have been submitted in each of the Centers’ annual Plans of Work.

The latest proposal from the Western Regional Aquaculture Center’s (WRAC) grant request for FY 2014 will fund continuing and new projects. The proposal will fund Year 2 of a project entitled “Profitable and biosecure rock scallop culture for the West Coast;” Year 2 of a project entitled “Determination and practical application of egg quality measures toward reliable culture of high-value marine finfish species;” and Year 2 of a project entitled “If you feed them, will they grow? A Dietary approach to improving the growth of juvenile cutthroat trout;” and a WRAC Publications project.

Regional projects submitted through the Northeastern Regional Aquaculture Center include: NRAC Program Planning and Publications 2014 Funds; White Worm, Enchytraeus albidus, Production and Marketing for live Aquaculture Feed; and Hatchery and Nursery Technologies for Improved Production of Blue Mussels. Regional projects submitted through the North central Regional Aquaculture center include: Establishing Largemouth Bass Strains for Rapid Growth to 1.5 Pounds in the North Central Region; Regional Aquaculture Extension Specialist (RAES). Projects to utilize remaining funds will be submitted to NIFA for programmatic approval at a later date.

Regional Projects submitted through the Southern Regional center include: Integrated Approaches to Reducing Individual Variability and Providing Year Round Harvest of Channel× Blue Hybrid Catfish; Evaluation of Probiotic and Prebiotic Supplements with Catfish, Golden Shiners, Hybrid Striped Bass and Tilapia under Conditions of Commercial Production; Studies to Improve the Control of Virulent Aeromonas hydrophila and Evaluate the Impact of Environmental Factors on its Abundance in Catfish Aquaculture Ponds, Year 2.

Regional projects funded by the Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture include: Establishment of Milkfish Fry Production in Palau to Reduce Dependency on Imported Fry, Year 1; Development of Marine Finfish Aquaculture, Aquatic Feeds, and Training in the Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI) for Sustainability and Food Security,
Year 2; Potential of Black Soldier Fly as a Feed Ingredient to Support Hawaiian Aquaculture,
Year 1; Utilization of Local Agri-Processing By-Products to Produce Fungal Protein for Aquatic Feed Production,
Year 1; Assuring Oyster Seed Supply for Hawai'i and the West Coast,
Year 1; Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture of Shrimp and Sea Cucumbers for Nutrient Recycling, Sludge Reduction, and Creation of Additional Revenue Streams,
Year 1; Aquaculture of Opihi - Years 3 and 4; and Aquaculture Information Service for the Pacific Region, FY 2014.

(I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops (aka Canola Research):

For FY 2014:
1) This research addresses some important issues on the production and management of agronomic practices of canola, an important supplemental and alternative crop of the Pacific Northwest USA (PNW). The objectives of this proposed research are: a) identification of improved suitable cultivars of winter and spring canola, b) releasing of some stable canola lines with high yield potential and superior oil qualities over diverse environments, c) studying the survival of spring canola as winter canola and d) investigation on the suitable planting date and timing to improve yields in the fall production of canola.

2) This project explores the usefulness of winter canola as a dual-purpose crop to continue expansion of canola acreage in the Southeastern region.

(J) Policy Research Centers (aka Agriculture and Rural Policy Research):

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(K) Rangeland Research Program (aka Joe Skeen Institute and/or McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry):

The program was not funded in FY 2014.

(L) Forest Products Research Program:

The program was not funded in FY 2014. Fiscal Year 2015: For Fiscal Year 2015:

(A) Expert IPM Decision Support Systems:

The program was not funded in FY 2015.

(B) Global Change, UV-Monitoring:

For FY 2015:

The USDA has long been concerned about high levels of ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, which are known to have harmful effects on agricultural crops, rangelands, forest ecosystems, humans, and livestock. The purpose of this program is to support research which:
• generates an uninterrupted stream of climatology data;
• determines mechanisms and symptoms of plant and animal response; and
• applies tightly integrated crop and climate models to assess regional and national impacts (both biological and economic) of multiple plant stressors.

(C ) Integrated Pest Management & Biological Control:

The program was not funded in FY 2015.

(D) Interregional Research Project # 4 – (aka Minor Crop Pest Management and/or IR-4) Program:

Interregional Research Project No. 4 Minor Crop Pest Management

For FY 2015:

This project supports the North Central Region IR-4 Center at Michigan State University, the Southern Region Center at University of Florida, the Western Region Center at University of California and the Northeastern Region Center at Rutgers University. It also supports the National Headquarters Office which is located at Rutgers University. Since the plant protection industry has little economic incentive to develop registrations for specialty crop chemicals, IR-4 develops the data that support legal, effective, safe, and IPM-compatible pest control agents for minor and specialty crops. Without this program, many specialty crops could no longer be produced in the US or would be greatly compromised in cost and quality. This project’s objectives for minor and specialty crops are to obtain pesticide clearances for food uses, further the development and adoption of biopesticides, and conduct research to protect ornamental crops. There are five regions that can apply for IR-4 funding.

(E) Pest Management Alternatives (PMAP):

The program was not funded in 2015.

(F) Other: Potato Breeding Research:

For FY 2015:

Anticipated: The goal of this project is to release and commercialize varieties for Northwest potato industry. The project includes a wide range of effective methods to identify valuable traits, recombined them with outstanding genotypes through crosses, and then apply selection pressures to increase the probability of creating varieties that can be produced and used more efficiently than existing varieties. Potato is a complex crop, such that there are numerous breeding goals, including high yield, improved processing quality, genetic resistance to major pests and diseases, higher levels of resistance to stresses, increased nutrient use efficiency, improved human nutritional value, and high tuber quality, and reduced use of pesticides, water, and fertilizers.

Anticipated: The goal of this project is to develop and evaluate improved cultivars that meet the unique production, marketing, environmental and consumer needs of the Southwest.

(G) Critical Agricultural Materials:

This program was not funded in FY 2015.

(H) Aquaculture Centers:

For FY 2015:

Administrative proposals from all five of the Regional Aquaculture Centers have been received and are awaiting review and programmatic approval.

(I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops (aka Canola Research):

For FY 2015:

It is anticipated that projects funded in 2015 will significantly increase canola production by developing and testing superior germplasm, methods of planting, cultivation, and harvesting, and then transferring new knowledge to producers. This requires communication of outcomes to end users.

(J) Policy Research Centers (aka Agriculture and Rural Policy Research):

The program was not funded in FY 2015.

(K) Rangeland Research Program (aka Joe Skeen Institute and/or McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry):

The program was not funded in FY 2015.

(L) Forest Products Research Program:

The program was not funded in FY 2015. Fiscal Year 2016: For Fiscal Year 2016:

(A) Expert IPM Decision Support Systems:

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(B) Global Change, UV-Monitoring:

For FY 2016:

The USDA has long been concerned about high levels of ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, which are known to have harmful effects on agricultural crops, rangelands, forest ecosystems, humans, and livestock. The purpose of this program is to support research which:
• generates an uninterrupted stream of climatology data;
• determines mechanisms and symptoms of plant and animal response; and
• applies tightly integrated crop and climate models to assess regional and national impacts (both biological and economic) of multiple plant stressors.

(C ) Integrated Pest Management & Biological Control:

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(D) Interregional Research Project # 4 – (aka Minor Crop Pest Management and/or IR-4) Program:

Interregional Research Project No. 4 Minor Crop Pest Management

For FY 2016:

This project is projected to continue support for four regional Centers plus a National Headquarters Office. Since the plant protection industry has little economic incentive to develop registrations for specialty crop chemicals, IR-4 develops the data that provide legal, effective, safe, and IPM-compatible pest control agents for minor and specialty crops. Without this program, many specialty crops could no longer be produced in the US or would be greatly compromised in cost and quality. This project’s objectives for minor and specialty crops are to obtain pesticide clearances for food uses, further the development and adoption of biopesticides, and conduct research to protect ornamental crops. There are five regions that can apply for IR-4 funding.

(E) Pest Management Alternatives (PMAP):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(F) Other: Potato Breeding Research:

Information is not yet available. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.

(G) Critical Agricultural Materials:

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(H) Aquaculture Centers:

For FY 2016:

Funding of the Regional Aquaculture Center Program will, again, be split equally five ways to fund regional projects germane to the aquaculture industry in the region. The focus of projects submitted from each of the Centers will be determined by industry input, reviewed for technical merit by each Center’s Technical Advisory Committee, and approved by the Centers’ Board of Directors prior to submission to NIFA.

(I) Supplemental and Alternative Crops (aka Canola Research):

Information is not yet available. Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.

(J) Policy Research Centers (aka Agriculture and Rural Policy Research):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(K) Rangeland Research Program (aka Joe Skeen Institute and/or McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry):

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.

(L) Forest Products Research Program:

Additional funding is not anticipated for FY 2016.
Criteria for Selecting Proposals
Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Request for Application (RFA).
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