Puget Sound Action Agenda: Technical Investigations and Implementation Assistance Program

 

Puget Sound has been designated as one of 28 estuaries of National Significance under section 320 of the Clean Water Act. The goal of the National Estuary Program is to attain and maintain water quality in designated estuaries that will assure protection of public water supplies and the protection and propagation of a balanced, indigenous population of shellfish, fish and wildlife and allows recreational activities in and on the water. The Puget Sound National Estuary Program's approved Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP), the Action Agenda, has a goal to restore and maintain the Puget Sound Estuary's environment by meeting 2020 ecosystem targets.

The EPA is committed to protecting and improving water quality and minimizing the adverse impacts of rapid development in the Puget Sound Basin. These commitments include protecting the watersheds and waters of Puget Sound by protecting the fundamental watershed processes that provide and create aquatic habitats and by reducing the generation and release of toxic, nutrient and pathogen pollution.

This program has the following main objectives:

First, implementing the approved CCMP, the Action Agenda for Puget Sound, is the primary objective of this program. Funds are directed to the highest priority work as articulated in biennial updates to the Action Agenda work plan. The updated biennial work plan identifies specific near term actions to achieve reductions in the harmful impacts on Puget Sound and restore previously damaged aquatic ecosystem functions. A central component of the approved CCMP for Puget Sound is its Biennial Science Work plan which identifies some of the core scientific work that must be completed in order for Action Agenda implementation efforts to succeed. This program is to support implementation of priority near term actions and to support the technical studies and investigations that are needed to help direct implementation priorities.

Second, the Scientific Studies and Technical Investigations awards through this program will help support the tracking systems and evaluation approaches for implementation activities. Together with projects aimed at achievement of specific environmental outcomes, the science studies and technical investigations inform adaptive management of the program significantly contributing to the restoration and protection of Puget Sound by 2020.

Specific areas of focus for Puget Sound protection and restoration were identified in 2010 as Toxics and Nutrients, Pathogens, Marine Nearshore, Watershed Protection, and Management of Implementation of the Action Agenda. These areas of work were funded through FY2015 by awards to lead organizations in the areas of focus.

Funding Priority - Fiscal Year 2014: No new solicitation for FFY2014 funding is planned for the scientific and technical studies and investigations.

Priorities for the five Lead Organization awards FFY2010 through FFY2015 include:

Priorities for the five Lead Organization awards include: Nearshore and Marine Lead Organization; Protecting habitat through promoting effective regulation of marine and nearshore areas; Enhancing enforcement of and compliance with regulations governing habitat alteration, including shoreline modification; Restoring habitat, including shorelines, estuaries, and feeder bluffs/drift cell function; Developing programs to reduce shoreline armoring and, where armoring is needed, promote soft armoring techniques to achieve a net gain of unarmored shoreline. Funding for chemical anayses for Toxics in Fish Vital Signs.

Watersheds (for stormwater): Focus on protection and restoration of floodplains, stream shorelines, riparian areas and primary creeks; Focus on levees and flood revetments; Enforcement of Critical Area Ordinances; Address stormwater impacts to the hydrological regime by working with local government to limit impervious surface and manage flows; Work with local governments to develop ecosystem service markets (placing value on ecosystem services and functions); Stormwater facility design and prioritization; establishment of permanent conservation easements.

Toxics and Nutrients Lead Organization: Implement key findings from the Toxics Loading Study to prevent and reduce toxic loadings to Puget Sound; Implement key findings from Ecology reports on nutrient programs in Puget Sound and address sources of nutriends on agricultural lands; Support of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification.

Pathogens Lead Organization: Focus on recoverable shellfish beds; Work with local governments to create effective ordinances and enforcement programs; Develop sustainable funding in each health district for on-site septic system (OSSS) repair and maintenance programs; Complete no discharge zone designation.

Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization: Funding in support of the habitat-related efforts of the Northwest Straits Commission; Direct funding for Local Integrating Organization habitat protection and restoration projects; Integration of science into the CCMP, performance management, monitoring, and managing the required matching funds provided by the Management Conference.

Funding Priority - Fiscal Year 2015: No new solicitations for FFY2015 funding were conducted for these areas under the Scientific Studies and Technical Investigations program.

Priorities for the five Lead Organization awards FFY2010 through FFY2015 include:

Nearshore and Marine Lead Organization; Protecting habitat through promoting effective regulation of marine and nearshore areas; Enhancing enforcement of and compliance with regulations governing habitat alteration, including shoreline modification; Restoring habitat, including shorelines, estuaries, and feeder bluffs/drift cell function; Developing programs to reduce shoreline armoring and, where armoring is needed, promote soft armoring techniques to achieve a net gain of unarmored shoreline. Funding for chemical analyses for Toxics in Fish Vital Signs.

Watersheds (for stormwater): Focus on protection and restoration of floodplains, stream shorelines, riparian areas and primary creeks; Focus on levees and flood revetments; Enforcement of Critical Area Ordinances; Address stormwater impacts to the hydrological regime by working with local government to limit impervious surface and manage flows; Work with local governments to develop ecosystem service markets (placing value on ecosystem services and functions); Stormwater facility design and prioritization; establishment of permanent conservation easements.

Toxics and Nutrients Lead Organization: Implement key findings from the Toxics Loading Study to prevent and reduce toxic loadings to Puget Sound; Implement key findings from Ecology reports on nutrient programs in Puget Sound and address sources of nutrients on agricultural lands; Support of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification.

Pathogens Lead Organization: Focus on recoverable shellfish beds; Work with local governments to create effective ordinances and enforcement programs; Develop sustainable funding in each health district for on-site septic system (OSSS) repair and maintenance programs; Complete no discharge zone designation.

Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization: Funding in support of the habitat-related efforts of the Northwest Straits Commission; Direct funding for Local Integrating Organization habitat protection and restoration projects; Integration of science into the CCMP, performance management, monitoring, and managing the required matching funds provided by the Management Conference.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
66.123
Federal Agency/Office
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
Office: Region 10
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
Cooperative Agreements
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2014: See below for a few of the FFY2013 accomplishments under these Lead Organization Grants and Interagency Agreements.



Watersheds Lead Organization

" Floodplains by Design (FbD)  Funding was awarded by the Watershed Lead Organization to the Nature Conservancy and USGS to initiate planning and coordination efforts to support the Floodplain Restoration target identified in the 2012 Action Agenda. The goals of this foundational project were to promote the reduction of flood risks and concurrent improvement of habitat processes within floodplain ecosystems while maintaining or improving agricultural production, open space/recreation and also improving the coordination of public funding for floodplain restoration efforts. As a result of this initial work, a new capital funding program was launched in 2013 by the state legislature, which authorized $33 million to advance the implementation of integrated floodplain projects in Puget Sound.

" In 2014 the Watershed Lead Organization launched a riparian initiative to establish conservation easements in prioritized stream reaches flowing through low elevation agricultural lands. Through a coordinated investment approach, EPA funds will help leverage funding from other agricultural stewardship and riparian restoration programs with the objective of restoring and permanently protecting upwards of 2,000 acres of riparian corridors in priority watersheds. The current advisory group includes other state and federal agencies, local tribes, agricultural interests, local land trusts and a number of technical advisors.

" Stormwater retrofit planning was supported in prioritized sub-watersheds in six cities and seven counties across Puget Sound to improve water quality and hydrological processes necessary for both shellfish bed protection and salmon habitat restoration. These planning and design projects were then eligible for capital implementation funding provided by the state legislature to the Washington Department of Ecology.

" Scientists studying small streams have developed a new way to monitor the overall condition of the aquatic biological community using a measure referred to as the Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity or BIBI. This measure is highly responsive to changes in water quality, hydrology, erosion and sedimentation and as such is recognized as a key measure for evaluating the cumulative effects of stormwater on local streams. Funding was provided to King County who agreed to serve as the lead for developing this indicator and readying its use to track the success of sub-watershed scale stormwater management and retrofit efforts. Most of this foundational work was completed in 2014 and we expect the BIBI indicator target to be incorporated into the 2016 Action Agenda update including the identification of specific watersheds where management actions would be directed.

— Final products were produced using high resolution remote sensing to quantify land use changes across the watersheds draining into Puget Sound. Two recent timeframes were used to establish trends in land use change - 2006 to 2009 and then again from 2009 to 2011. Information is now being used in consultation with local governments to assess local growth management and critical area protection policies.



Pathogens Lead Organization

— Shellfish Beds Restoration Target: By September 2014, 3,057 acres of the 10,000 acre target (by year 2020) have been restored. Projected net increases for early FY15 total 235 more acres and one of the areas being actively pursued (Samish Bay) would add almost another 4,000 acres towards achievement of the 2020 target.

— Onsite Sewage System (OSS) Inspection/Correction Target: The 2020 OSS target in the Puget Sound Action Agenda requires that all systems in designated Marine Recovery Areas (MRAs) or other high risk areas be inventoried, inspected and repaired when needed at a rate of 95%. As of July 2014, 40% of systems in MRAs and other high-risk areas have been inspected, up 3% from the March 2014 rate. Low interest loan programs have been or are being put in place throughout the basin for OSS repair needs.

— OSS On-going Operations and Maintance: : Health worked with local health jurisdictions and other stakeholders via the Septic Financing Advisory Committee to introduce a 2015 State Legislative propopal to fund ongoing O & M needs at the local level using a per system annual fee.

— Pollution Identification and Correction (PIC) Programs: PIC programs operating in all 12 Puget Sound counties are supported by NEP grants. These programs are essential to recover and protect shellfish resources, swimming beaches and water quality. Workshops have been provided with counties, conservation districts, tribes, state and federal agencies and academia attending. These gatherings foster good communications and sharing of best practices by county-level health districts, providing timely forums for news about technological advances and problem solving.

— Livestock Management: Health provides NEP funds to the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) to work on reducing pollution from dairy operations and application of manure to dairy and non-dairy lands in Whatcom, Skagit, and Snohomish counties. WSDA worked with Ecology to develop referral and corrective action processes for dairy and non-dairy livestock operations and for manure applicators. In FY14, WSDA's inspector made 69 dairy inspections, issuing written notification of problems or warning letters to nine dairies and one manure applicator. Of these, four dairies were referred to the local Conservation District and eleven dairies successfully implemented BMPs. WSDA staff coordinate with EPA enforcement staff when documented discharges occur without an NPDES permit. Visual assessments of field conditions, nutrient applications and storage capacity were conducted for 120 lagoons in the Portage Bay, Samish Bay and Lower Stillaguamish basins. WSDA provided technical assistance for 19% of facilities inspected.

— Vessel Sewage Management: Work on a 'No Discharge Zone' petition for Puget Sound continues as the state coordinates with EPA legal counsel on petition options, conducts nutrient cycling studies and communicates with the regulated community. Over 26,000 comments on a draft No Discharge Zone petition were received - most of the comments are supportive of the designation. Washington's Parks and Recreation Department installed or repaired pump-out stations in seven areas to protect shellfish.

— Pathogen Research, Reporting and Monitoring: Health is invested in research to improve understanding of pathogen and biotoxin threats to prevent disease outbreaks. Researchers deployed continuous temperature data loggers at pathogen monitoring sites in Puget Sound to understand relationships between temperature and disease occurances. This will enable development of proactive, risk based monitoring and notification program to prevent disease from Vibrio parahaemolyticus illnesses when linked to the consumption of commercially harvested oysters.

— Freshwater Algae/Mussel Project: Cages of Pacific blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus) were deployed at the mouths of Puget Sound rivers to determine if they can bioaccumulate microcystins (liver toxins) from freshwater algae blooms. These blooms can cause serious illnesses, killing wildlife and domestic animals. Data from this study are being analyzed and a final report for the project will soon be available.

— Policy Work: Health participates on shellfish advisory groups convened by the Governor's Shellfish Policy Advisor along with several other state agencies to identify barriers for and solutions to shellfish restoration work, particularly in areas with high agricultural land use.



Marine Nearshore Lead Organization

" Nearly 4 miles [total FY07-14] of ecologically significant marine shoreline were protected or restored. This includes bluff-backed beaches and their contribution to associated drift cells, removal of shoreline revetments and armoring and restoration or protection of marine riparian areas - - all critical habitats and priorities for restoring estuarine functions. See Funded Projects List - Regulation and Stewardship.

" Over 800 acres of habitat protected or restored [total FY07-14] including re-connection of river deltas and coastal pocket estuaries and restoration of tidal marshes, tidelands and associated eelgrass beds throughout Puget Sound by marine near-shore grantees and partners.

" Restoring shorelines through reduction of shoreline armoring is a strong element of this cooperative agreement. In addition to the above, armor reducing actions include funding:

ü Development of an incentives toolkit.

ü Five local projects to provide incentives for armor reduction work.

ü Development of a regional-hub website focused on "Shore Friendly" information and practices.

ü Outreach, education and ecological impacts monitoring components at three prior-funded armor removal sites.

" A "Social Marketing to Reduce Shoreline Armoring" project was completed and results have been well-received by the region. Data sharing agreements have been established with many organizations, and five awards were made to local entities for projects providing incentives to reduce shoreline armoring.

" Three sub-awards targeted at protecting bluff-backed beaches and other priority nearshore habitat will result in fully addressing one of the priority Near Term Actions of the Habitat Strategic Initiative to protect 10% of bluff-backed beaches in Puget Sound. These projects were selected and contracting was underway at the end of FY2014.

" 220 derelict fishing nets [total FY07-14 increment] have been recovered from Puget Sound, resulting in protection of over 48 acres of marine habitat. The Northwest Straits Foundation coordinates this program. The Foundation has designed and implemented a response and removal program for new and reported lost nets. There were 31 new, lost-net reports in FY14; investigations and reconnaissance found 16 derelict-gear nets that were removed from the environment.

" Two rain gardens were installed in Port Townsend's Uptown District in time to collect and filter storm-water runoff from winter storms. This project, sponsored by the Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee, WSU Extension and the City of Port Townsend targeted high-priority drainage areas where unfiltered storm-water flowed directly into the bay.

" Oil Spill Preparedness Workshops were sponsored by Marine Resource Committees and the Northwest Straits Foundation for northwest Puget Sound counties and communities.

" The Northwest Straits Commission has launched a citizen science initiative to monitor and protect kelp in northern Puget Sound.

" The Snohomish Marine Resource Committee worked with over 30 partners to develop a Conservation Action Plan for Port Susan identifying six strategies for ecosystem recovery in the Marine Stewardship Area (MSA). The final plan was adopted in 2012 and the MSA was officially designated by the Snohomish County Council in 2014.



Toxics and Nutrients Lead Organization

" ŹApproximately 1,216 pounds of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) were prevented from entering the environment annually by removing creosote piling and uncertified wood stoves. Based on the Puget Sound Toxics Assessment, PAHs are significant toxics entering the Sound. This grant funded implementation of the Puget Sound portion of Washington's PAH Chemical Action Plan (CAP) with activities such as:

ü Removal of 1,006 creosote treated pilings from Puget Sound in two pilot areas: Northern Hood Canal (Jefferson County) and the Chambers Creek (Pierce County) to protect spawning herring populations and reduce embryo mortality. NEP's cumulative investment for all removals and monitoring was approximately $967,000. Due to these successful pilots, the state legislature appropriated $2.5 million in 2014 to continue removals at other piling sites in Pierce County.

ü Funding of uncertified woodstove removals and change-outs in and around Washington's only Clean Air Act non-attainment area (greater Tacoma area). This has resulted in over 300 PAH-producing wood stoves being removed in this critical area to-date.

ü Reducing automotive leaks that are a major source of PAH pollution. The "Don't Drip and Drive" project provided hands-on training and spill kits to 1,120 partcipants at King County community colleges and at other regional locations to detect and prevent pollution from automotive leaks. Ecology also partnered with the Railway Tie Association to sample for PAH- runoff along regional railroad infrastructure, including establishment of source control options for creosote-treated ties.

" Local Source Control (LSC) specialists conducted 1,625 technical assistance visits to small businesses. Approximately 75% (1,219) had at least one hazardous materials or stormwater management issue. 88% (1,073) of problems identified were corrected. The visits targeted auto repair shops, medical and dental facilities, restaurants and gas stations. LSC specialists identified hazardous waste deposal and stormwater problems so that small businesses can fix them voluntarily to avoid potential monetary compliance and enforcement actions.

" Eleven local projects to implement nutrient reduction TMDLs are were started and concluded in 2014 or remain underway. Nine projects started in FFY14 are active in nutrient sensitive areas of Kitsap (2), Thurston (2), Whatcom (2), Mason (1), Pierce (1), and Snohmish (1) counties. Two FY14 projects in Mason and Thurston counties are finished.

" 169 products were tested under the Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) enforcement pilot project to ensrue compliance with bioaccumulative and other toxics bans in Washington. While it's illegal to sell specific products containing banned toxics, there had been no active enforcement to check if the bans were working before this project. This project purchased and tested items for chemicals, and communicated with retailers and manufacturers if toxics exceeding thresholds were found. Notices of correction were issued when appropriate. The project cost $219,000 and was instrumental in securing a 2014 state legislative approriation of over $1,000,000/biennium to expand and continue the program. The program provides testing and enforcement for Washington's Children's Safe Products Act, Toxics in Packaging Law, Bisphenol A (BPA) ban, and PBDE ban.

" Ecology has 56 ongoing projects to prevent and manage toxics and nutrient pollution in Puget Sound. Project selection was based on highest impact and most benefit resulting in several state-of-the art activities including:

ü 47 acre purchase of a former golf course (Oakland Bay/Mason County) to protect salmon habitat and shellfish beds from toxic and nutrient pollution.

ü Installation of two trial-level sanitary sewer denitrification systems (Hood Canal) to test for performance and feasability.

ü Removal of 900 piles and a 4,600 sq. ft. overwater structure at a former log-rafting site (northern Hood Canal).

ü Identification of safer products than commonly used toxic chemicals, including early steps to conduct product analyses using the "Interstate Chemicals Clearinghouse Alternatives Assessment Guide" especially to replace copper-based boat-bottom paint.

ü Conclusion of "Vehicle Drips and Leaks Education" project: 1,120 people received training to prevent leaks, discount coupons for leak repairs and how to use a spill kit.

ü Seattle Public Utilities pumped out 24,800 sq. ft. of storm drains nearly doubling their capacity to a cumulative total of 50,825 sq. ft. total pumped. 60 tons of sediments containing legacy-pollutants were removed - most drains have never been cleaned.



Managing Action Agenda Implementation  Puget Sound Partnership

* Performance Accountability -The Puget Sound Partnership's Project Atlas and Action Agenda Report Card have been launched and maintained with updates in FY2014.

These reporting tools help stakeholders, policy makers, and the public. The Project Atlas allows users to see the projects being done and the progress being made to restore Puget Sound. The Action Agenda Report Card provides a transparent and accessible way to gauge progress in implementing the Action Agenda by clearly showing essential milestones and performance measures, identifying the reason progress may not be on track, and identifying the corrective actions required.



Interagency Agreement Funding

" Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) techniques were assessed under NEP project funding to advance Puget Sound Basin stormwater management, permit and retrofit programs. New research by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and their partners (NOAA and Washington State University) looked at:

o Existing and future threats to salmon and their habitats from toxic stormwater runoff in urban watersheds, and

o Effectiveness of pollution reduction technologies (green stormwater infrastructure) as a strategy to improve water quality and enhance salmon survival. This work will help resource managers effectively protect the health of a Puget Sound ecosystem that is increasingly under pressure from human population growth, development, land cover change, climate change and degraded water quality from land-based stormwater runoff. The research showed bio-retention, such as soil infiltration via rain gardens downstream wetlands and floodplain areas is very effective in protecting the health of salmon and other aquatic species from harmful effects of toxic stormwater runoff. Fiscal Year 2015: No accomplishments to report with this year funding since the incremental funding was awarded in late FFY2015. Fiscal Year 2016: No Current Data Available
Authorization
Clean Water Act, Title 1, Section 104(b), Public Law 106-457, 33 U.S.C 1254(b); Clean Water Act, Title 3, Section 320(g)(3)(A)(ii, Public Law 94-117, 33 U.S.C 1330; Clean Water Act, Title 1, Section 104(b), Public Law 94-117, 33 U.S.C 1254(b); Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, Public Law 111-8; Clean Water Act, Title 1, Section 104, Public Law 106-457, 33 U.S.C 1254(a); Clean Water Act, Title 1, Section 104, Public Law 94-117, 33 U.S.C 1254(a); Clean Water Act, Title 3, Section 320(g)(3)(A)(ii, Public Law 106-457, 33 U.S.C 1330; Department of the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2010, Public Law 111-88; Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Public Law 112-74; Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011, Public Law 111-242; Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Public Law 113-6; Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 , Public Law 113-76.
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
Federal government agencies and Washington State government agencies are eligible to apply under this program.

Public and private institutions of higher education located in the United States are eligible to apply under this program.

Units of local government organized under Washington State law and located within the Greater Puget Sound basin are eligible to apply. Also eligible to apply are special purpose districts, as defined by Washington State law at R.C.W. 36.93.020, including but not limited to, irrigation districts, and water and sewer districts that are located in or govern land and water resources within the greater Puget Sound basin. Conservation districts located in or governing land and water resources within the greater Puget Sound Basin are also eligible to apply for assistance under this program.

Watershed planning units formed under RCW 90.82.040 and RCW 90.82.060, local management boards organized under RCW 90.88.030, salmon recovery lead entities organized pursuant to RCW 77.85.050, regional fisheries enhancement groups organized pursuant to RCW 77.95.060 and Marine Resource Committees organized pursuant to RCW 36.125.010 and RCW 36.125.020 are eligible to apply if they are located within or their jurisdictions include waters and/or lands within the Greater Puget Sound basin.

-Intrastate organizations such as associations of cities, counties or conservation districts in the Greater Puget Sound basin are also eligible to apply.

Nonprofit nongovernmental entities are also eligible to apply.

Federally recognized Indian Tribes located within the greater Puget Sound basin and any consortium of these eligible tribes are also eligible to apply.

An Intertribal consortium must have adequate documentation of the existence of the partnership and the authorization of the member Tribes to apply for and receive assistance. Documentation that demonstrates the existence of the partnership of Indian Tribal governments may consist of Tribal council resolutions, Intertribal consortia resolutions in conjunction with a Tribal council resolution from each member Tribe, or other written certification from a duly authorized representative of each Tribal government that clearly demonstrates that a partnership of Indian Tribal governments exists. Documentation that demonstrates that member Tribes authorize the consortium to apply for and receive assistance may consist of a Tribal council resolution from each Tribe or other written certification from a duly authorized representative of each Tribal government that clearly demonstrates that the Tribe authorizes the consortium to apply for and receive the grant on behalf of the Tribe. An Intertribal consortium resolution is not adequate documentation of the member Tribes authorization of the consortium unless it includes a written certification from a duly authorized representative of each Tribal government.

The greater Puget Sound basin is defined as all watersheds draining to the U.S. waters of Puget Sound, southern Georgia Basin, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

- For profit business entities, private individuals and families are not eligible to apply. However, all of these types of entities could partner with an eligible applicant as a subawardee.

- For certain competitive funding opportunities under this CFDA description, the Agency may limit eligibility to compete to a number or subset of eligible applicants consistent with the Agency's Assistance Agreement Competition Policy.
Beneficiary Eligibility
The direct beneficiaries would be the entities receiving the assistance. Due to the fact that the program is designed and intended to assist in the restoration and protection of the Puget Sound estuary, the ultimate beneficiaries will be the residents of the greater Puget Sound region.
Credentials/Documentation
OMB Circular A-87 has been codified at 2 C.F.R. Part 225. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
Regarding pre-application/pre-proposal assistance with respect to competitive funding opportunities under this program description, EPA will generally specify the nature of the pre-application/pre-proposal assistance, if any, that will be available to applicants in the competitive announcement. For additional information, contact the individual(s) listed as "Information Contacts" or see Appendix IV of the Catalog.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372. The State of Washington has chosen to not participate in this review process. Environmental impact information is not required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. For competitive awards, applicants will be required to submit application materials as described in the Request For Proposals. The Request For Proposals will also specify the submission methods which generally include an electronic and hard copy submission option. The standard application forms as furnished by the EPA and required by OMB Circulars No. A-110 and A-102 must be used for this program. EPA requires final applications to be made on Standard Form 424. Requests for application kits must be submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency, Grants and Interagency Agreement Management Division, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Mail Code 3903R, Washington, DC 20460 or though the EPA Region 10 Grants Administration web site at: http://www.epa.gov/pugetsound/index.html. Applicants may be able to use http://www.grants.gov to electronically apply for certain grant opportunities under this CFDA.
Award Procedure
For competitive awards, EPA will review and evaluate applications, proposals, and/or submissions in accordance with the terms, conditions, and criteria stated in the competitive announcement. Competitions will be conducted in accordance with EPA policies/regulations for competing assistance agreements.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
The Region expects that its review of the applications received in response to competitive solicitations will be completed within 120 to 150 calendar days following the deadline for the submission of applications for each Request for Proposals issued under this program.
Appeals
Assistance agreement competition-related disputes will be resolved in accordance with the dispute resolution procedures published in 70 FR (Federal Register) 3629, 3630 (January 26, 2005). Copies of these procedures may also be requested by contacting the individual(s) listed as "Information Contacts." Disputes relating to matters other than the competitive selection of recipients will be resolved under 40 CFR 30.63 or 40 CFR 31.70, as applicable.
Renewals
Not Applicable.
How are proposals selected?
The evaluation and selection criteria for competitive awards under this CFDA program description will be published in each announcement of a competitive funding opportunity (e.g., the Request for Proposals or RFP).
How may assistance be used?
The Puget Sound funds were appropriated by Congress in conjunction with the Clean Water Act for development and implementation of programs that will improve water quality, air quality, and minimize the adverse impacts of rapid development in the Puget Sound Basin, including activities linked to habitat restoration projects or controlling sources or nonpoint pollution.

The assistance offered can be used to finance technical studies and investigations, as well as protection and restoration activities necessary to achieve environmental outputs and/or outcomes identified in the Action Agenda. This Action Agenda implementation work can either be funded directly or through a Strategic Initiative Lead entity which could then fund subawards for Action Agenda implementation activities. Funding may also be used to develop and carry out implementation strategies that map out steps to achieve progress and outcomes for a particular ecosystem target, management issue, or geographic area.

Assistance can be used to finance work identified in the Puget Sound Partnership's Biennial Science Work plan.

Assistance may also be used to manage, monitor, oversee, or participate in the implementation of the 2020 Action Agenda for Puget Sound, including Tribal participation in the implementation and maintenance processes of the CCMP.

Assistance can be used to study, evaluate, model, plan, and prepare for the impacts of climate change on Puget Sound ecosystem protection and restoration activities. Such assistance could include: studies to evaluate the impacts of climate change on specific activities; development of tools and models that can assist in understanding the impacts of climate change; implementation strategies that consider the impacts of climate change and increase the climate resiliency of projects; and specific modification and adaptation of design or construction components of projects to increase the climate resiliency of Puget Sound protection and restoration activities.

Additional information on use restrictions, if any, for this program, will be provided in each Request for Proposals published on the EPA Region 10 website.

Assistance agreement awards under this program may involve or relate to geospatial information. Further information regarding geospatial information may be obtained by viewing the following website: http://geodata.epa.gov.

Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to adopt and enforce policies that ban text messaging while driving company-owned or -rented vehicles or government-owned vehicles, or while driving privately-owned vehicles when on official government business or when performing any work for or on behalf of the government. Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to conduct initiatives of the type described in section 3(a) of the Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging While Driving Executive Order that was signed on October 1, 2009.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
No program reports are required. No cash reports are required. Progress report requirements will be a part of each assistance agreement. A schedule of interim milestones and the outputs that will be completed by the end of the project period will also be included. Typical progress reports will discuss the progress that has been made on each major task and on each interim milestone identified in the approved statement of work. Progress reports will also discuss any difficulties or problems that have been encountered and how they have been or are being resolved. Other specific reporting requirements will be defined in the assistance agreement based on the statement of work described in the application. Expenditure reports will typically be required at the same time intervals as progress reports. The expenditure reports will document expenditures to date in a manner that allows the report user to confirm that all assistance payments (disbursements to assistance recipients) are for costs that have been incurred in compliance with applicable costs principles and, for assistance agreements in which a matching contribution is required, the reports will also document expenditures of that matching contribution. Recipients of this funding will be required to use EPA's Puget Sound Financial and Ecosystem Accounting Tracking System (FEATS), which is the primary mechanism for performance monitoring. Key grant outputs will be tracked on a semi-annual basis through FEATS, as well as progress towards project milestones and deliverables. FEATS provides linkages to EPA Puget Sound performance measures and Dashboard Indicators. FEATS allows award recipients to share challenges, solutions, lessons learned, and reflections associated with their work.
Auditing
In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. Grants and cooperative agreements are subject to inspections and audits by the Comptroller General of the United States, the EPA Office of Inspector General, other EPA staff, or any authorized representative of the Federal government. Reviews by the EPA Project Officer and the Grants Specialist may occur each year.
Records
Financial records, including all documents to support entries on accounting records and to substantiate charges to each grant must be kept available to personnel authorized to examine EPA grant accounts. All records must be maintained until expiration of three years from the date of submission of the final expenditure report. If questions still remain, such as those raised by an audit, related records shall be maintained until the matter is completely resolved.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
This program has no statutory formula.
Matching Requirements: Clean Water Act §104(a) and §104(b) have no statutory formula for match; that is, no match is required by the statute. Therefore, for awards under this program to be made under these authorities, the EPA will not require any non-federal match by any successful applicant.

If awards are made for general projects that implement the CCMP or that exercise management and oversight over the implementation of the CCMP, there will be a match requirement pursuant to CWA §320. For those projects funded under CWA §320(g)(2) and §320(g)(3)(ii), there is a statutory match of 50% of the total project costs. CWA §320 allows for an aggregate match; that is, the match requirement for federal financial assistance for national estuary program projects applies to the estuary's Management Conference as a whole. Thus, any spending of nonfederal funds by the Management Conference within a fiscal year can be used as match for federal financial assistance.

The EPA expects to structure the Request for Proposals issued under this program so that applicants can identify expenditures of nonfederal funds on projects that implement the CCMP by themselves as well as by other Management Conference members as proposed nonfederal match for the financial assistance being requested.

Contact the EPA Regional Office contact identified in this program description for more information.
This program does not have MOE requirements.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
The assistance will be awarded during FFY 2010, FFY 2011, FFY 2012, FFY 2013, FFY2014, and FFY2015. Funds will be disbursed to individual assistance recipients in accordance with the terms specified in the assistance agreement. Dependent on congressional appropriations, new funding will be available for FFY2016. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Assistance will be disbursed in accordance with the terms specified in the assistance agreement. Typically, assistance recipients draw funds at either monthly or quarterly intervals based on their incurred costs.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
See Regional Agency Offices. Angela Bonifaci, Team Leader
Puget Sound Team
Office of Ecosystems, Tribal and Public Affairs
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10
1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite 900, ETPA-086
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 553-0332 or 1-800-424-4EPA, extension 3-0332
E-Mail: bonifaci.angela@epa.gov.
Headquarters Office
Angela Bonifaci Puget Sound Team
Office of Ecosystems, Tribal and Public Affairs
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10
1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite 900, ETPA-086
, Seattle, Washington 98101 Email: bonifaci.angela@epa.gov Phone: (206) 553-0332
Website Address
http://www.epa.gov/pugetsound/funding/index.html
Financial Information
Account Identification
68-0108-0-1-304.
Obligations
(Project Grants) FY 14 $15,762,920; FY 15 est $15,671,520; and FY 16 Estimate Not Available - EPA awarded approximately $9.0 million for scientific studies and technical investigations in FFY 2011 from FFY 2010 funds based on one competitive solicitation. The projects are identified on an annotated list at this web page:



http://www.epa.gov/pugetsound/funding/index.html#science



The Region also awarded nearly $4.0 million in FFY 2010 funds to the University of Washington's Puget Sound Institute pursuant to Congressional direction in the FFY 2010 appropriation.



The Region awarded $6,000,000 in FFY 2010 funds to the Puget Sound Partnership to manage the implementation of the Action Agenda, pursuant to Congressional direction in the EPA's FFY 2010 appropriation.



The Region awarded approximately $3.1 million each in four awards to state agencies to lead Puget Sound ecosystem recovery efforts. Two of these awards were to the Washington State Department of Ecology to lead efforts for both "Toxics and Nutrients" and "Watershed Protection". A third award was made to the Washington State Department of Health for "Pathogen Control". The fourth award was made to the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife for "Marine and Nearshore Habitat Protection".



The Region awarded approximately $5.5m in incremental funding in FFY 2011 funds to each of these ecosystem Lead Organizations, totaling $21,600,000.



In FY 2012, the Region awarded approximately $3,600,000 in incremental funding to the four ecosystem lead organizations and $3,000,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Inplementation Lead Organization, totaling ~$17,400,000. The watershed Lead Organization also received an additional $1,800,000 for stormwater retrofit project prioritization and design. FY12 funding totaled $19,200,000.



In FY 2013, the Region awarded approximately $3,320,000 in incremental funding to the four ecosystem lead organizations and $2,800,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization, totaling around $16,048,105. The watershed lead organization also received an additional, $1,200,000 for the riparian initiative. FY13 funding totaled $17,248,105.



In FY 2014, the Region awarded approximately $2,490,000 in incremental funding to each of the four ecosystem lead organizations and $2,850,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization, totaling around $12,810,000. The watershed lead organization also received an additional $2,861,520 for the establishment of permanent conservation easements, and the marine nearshore lead organization received an additional $91,400 for chemical analyses for Toxics in Fish Vital Signs.



In FY 2015, the Region will award approximately $2,490,000 in incremental funding to each of the four ecosystem lead organizations and $2,850,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization, totaling around $12,810,000. The watershed lead organization also will receive an additional $2,861,520 for the establishment of permanent conservation easements, and the other lead organizations received supplemental funding for strategic initiative work. The Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization received supplemental funding for implementation strategy work, additional funding for the local implementing organizations, and funding for special projects.



New funding awards in FY 2016 are dependent on the appropriations the EPA receives.




EPA awarded approximately $9.0 million for scientific studies and technical investigations in FFY 2011 from FFY 2010 funds based on one competitive solicitation. The projects are identified on an annotated list at this web page:


http://www.epa.gov/pugetsound/funding/index.html#science


The Region also awarded nearly $4.0 million in FFY 2010 funds to the University of Washington's Puget Sound Institute pursuant to Congressional direction in the FFY 2010 appropriation.


The Region awarded $6,000,000 in FFY 2010 funds to the Puget Sound Partnership to manage the implementation of the Action Agenda, pursuant to Congressional direction in the EPA's FFY 2010 appropriation.


The Region awarded approximately $3.1 million each in four awards to state agencies to lead Puget Sound ecosystem recovery efforts. Two of these awards were to the Washington State Department of Ecology to lead efforts for both "Toxics and Nutrients" and "Watershed Protection". A third award was made to the Washington State Department of Health for "Pathogen Control". The fourth award was made to the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife for "Marine and Nearshore Habitat Protection".


The Region awarded approximately $5.5m in incremental funding in FFY 2011 funds to each of these ecosystem Lead Organizations, totaling $21,600,000.


In FY 2012, the Region awarded approximately $3,600,000 in incremental funding to the four ecosystem lead organizations and $3,000,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Inplementation Lead Organization, totaling ~$17,400,000. The watershed Lead Organization also received an additional $1,800,000 for stormwater retrofit project prioritization and design. FY12 funding totaled $19,200,000.


In FY 2013, the Region awarded approximately $3,320,000 in incremental funding to the four ecosystem lead organizations and $2,800,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization, totaling around $16,048,105. The watershed lead organization also received an additional, $1,200,000 for the riparian initiative. FY13 funding totaled $17,248,105.


In FY 2014, the Region awarded approximately $2,490,000 in incremental funding to each of the four ecosystem lead organizations and $2,850,000 for the Management of Action Agenda Implementation Lead Organization, totaling around $12,810,000. The watershed lead organization also received an additional $2,861,520 for the establishment of permanent conservation easements, and the marine nearshore lead organization received an additional $91,400 for chemical analyses for Toxics in Fish Vital Signs.


Additional incremental awards in FY 2015 are dependent on the appropriations the EPA receives.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
The EPA made awards for scientific and technical studies in the range of $200,000 - $700,000. Awards for implementation assistance and for managing and monitoring the implementation of the CCMP ranged from $200,000 to $6,000,000 each. Funding for the lead organization grants has ranged from $2.490M to $5.500M.

Some of these awards may be incrementally funded with appropriations from future fiscal years. See under #122 for more details on the funding for the specific year.
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
For grants and cooperative agreements with local governments, tribal governments and special purpose districts, the procedures and requirements should be in conformance with the OMB's Uniform Grants Guidance (UGG) located in 2 CFR 200 (Uniform Administrative Requirements,Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards). This supercedes and streamlines requirements from 40 C.F.R. Part 31 "Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments", and OMB Circular Nos. A-21, A-87, A-110, and A-122 (which had been placed in 2 CFR 220, 225, 215, and 230).

40 C.F.R. Part 35 "Environmental Program Grants-State, Interstate and Local Government Agencies" is still applicable.




Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2014: See below for a few of the FFY2014 accomplishments under these Lead Organization Grants and Interagency Agreements.



Watersheds Lead Organization

" Floodplains by Design (FbD)  Funding was awarded by the Watershed Lead Organization to the Nature Conservancy and USGS to initiate planning and coordination efforts to support the Floodplain Restoration target identified in the 2012 Action Agenda. The goals of this foundational project were to promote the reduction of flood risks and concurrent improvement of habitat processes within floodplain ecosystems while maintaining or improving agricultural production, open space/recreation and also improving the coordination of public funding for floodplain restoration efforts. As a result of this initial work, a new capital funding program was launched in 2013 by the state legislature, which authorized $33 million to advance the implementation of integrated floodplain projects in Puget Sound.

" In 2014 the Watershed Lead Organization launched a riparian initiative to establish conservation easements in prioritized stream reaches flowing through low elevation agricultural lands. Through a coordinated investment approach, EPA funds will help leverage funding from other agricultural stewardship and riparian restoration programs with the objective of restoring and permanently protecting upwards of 2,000 acres of riparian corridors in priority watersheds. The current advisory group includes other state and federal agencies, local tribes, agricultural interests, local land trusts and a number of technical advisors.

" Stormwater retrofit planning was supported in prioritized sub-watersheds in six cities and seven counties across Puget Sound to improve water quality and hydrological processes necessary for both shellfish bed protection and salmon habitat restoration. These planning and design projects were then eligible for capital implementation funding provided by the state legislature to the Washington Department of Ecology.

" Scientists studying small streams have developed a new way to monitor the overall condition of the aquatic biological community using a measure referred to as the Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity or BIBI. This measure is highly responsive to changes in water quality, hydrology, erosion and sedimentation and as such is recognized as a key measure for evaluating the cumulative effects of stormwater on local streams. Funding was provided to King County who agreed to serve as the lead for developing this indicator and readying its use to track the success of sub-watershed scale stormwater management and retrofit efforts. Most of this foundational work was completed in 2014 and we expect the BIBI indicator target to be incorporated into the 2016 Action Agenda update including the identification of specific watersheds where management actions would be directed.

— Final products were produced using high resolution remote sensing to quantify land use changes across the watersheds draining into Puget Sound. Two recent timeframes were used to establish trends in land use change - 2006 to 2009 and then again from 2009 to 2011. Information is now being used in consultation with local governments to assess local growth management and critical area protection policies.



Pathogens Lead Organization

— Shellfish Beds Restoration Target: By September 2014, 3,057 acres of the 10,000 acre target (by year 2020) have been restored. Projected net increases for early FY15 total 235 more acres and one of the areas being actively pursued (Samish Bay) would add almost another 4,000 acres towards achievement of the 2020 target.

— Onsite Sewage System (OSS) Inspection/Correction Target: The 2020 OSS target in the Puget Sound Action Agenda requires that all systems in designated Marine Recovery Areas (MRAs) or other high risk areas be inventoried, inspected and repaired when needed at a rate of 95%. As of July 2014, 40% of systems in MRAs and other high-risk areas have been inspected, up 3% from the March 2014 rate. Low interest loan programs have been or are being put in place throughout the basin for OSS repair needs.

— OSS On-going Operations and Maintance: : Health worked with local health jurisdictions and other stakeholders via the Septic Financing Advisory Committee to introduce a 2015 State Legislative propopal to fund ongoing O & M needs at the local level using a per system annual fee.

— Pollution Identification and Correction (PIC) Programs: PIC programs operating in all 12 Puget Sound counties are supported by NEP grants. These programs are essential to recover and protect shellfish resources, swimming beaches and water quality. Workshops have been provided with counties, conservation districts, tribes, state and federal agencies and academia attending. These gatherings foster good communications and sharing of best practices by county-level health districts, providing timely forums for news about technological advances and problem solving.

— Livestock Management: Health provides NEP funds to the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) to work on reducing pollution from dairy operations and application of manure to dairy and non-dairy lands in Whatcom, Skagit, and Snohomish counties. WSDA worked with Ecology to develop referral and corrective action processes for dairy and non-dairy livestock operations and for manure applicators. In FY14, WSDA's inspector made 69 dairy inspections, issuing written notification of problems or warning letters to nine dairies and one manure applicator. Of these, four dairies were referred to the local Conservation District and eleven dairies successfully implemented BMPs. WSDA staff coordinate with EPA enforcement staff when documented discharges occur without an NPDES permit. Visual assessments of field conditions, nutrient applications and storage capacity were conducted for 120 lagoons in the Portage Bay, Samish Bay and Lower Stillaguamish basins. WSDA provided technical assistance for 19% of facilities inspected.

— Vessel Sewage Management: Work on a 'No Discharge Zone' petition for Puget Sound continues as the state coordinates with EPA legal counsel on petition options, conducts nutrient cycling studies and communicates with the regulated community. Over 26,000 comments on a draft No Discharge Zone petition were received - most of the comments are supportive of the designation. Washington's Parks and Recreation Department installed or repaired pump-out stations in seven areas to protect shellfish.

— Pathogen Research, Reporting and Monitoring: Health is invested in research to improve understanding of pathogen and biotoxin threats to prevent disease outbreaks. Researchers deployed continuous temperature data loggers at pathogen monitoring sites in Puget Sound to understand relationships between temperature and disease occurances. This will enable development of proactive, risk based monitoring and notification program to prevent disease from Vibrio parahaemolyticus illnesses when linked to the consumption of commercially harvested oysters.

— Freshwater Algae/Mussel Project: Cages of Pacific blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus) were deployed at the mouths of Puget Sound rivers to determine if they can bioaccumulate microcystins (liver toxins) from freshwater algae blooms. These blooms can cause serious illnesses, killing wildlife and domestic animals. Data from this study are being analyzed and a final report for the project will soon be available.

— Policy Work: Health participates on shellfish advisory groups convened by the Governor's Shellfish Policy Advisor along with several other state agencies to identify barriers for and solutions to shellfish restoration work, particularly in areas with high agricultural land use.



Marine Nearshore Lead Organization

" Nearly 4 miles [total FY07-14] of ecologically significant marine shoreline were protected or restored. This includes bluff-backed beaches and their contribution to associated drift cells, removal of shoreline revetments and armoring and restoration or protection of marine riparian areas - - all critical habitats and priorities for restoring estuarine functions. See Funded Projects List - Regulation and Stewardship.

" Over 800 acres of habitat protected or restored [total FY07-14] including re-connection of river deltas and coastal pocket estuaries and restoration of tidal marshes, tidelands and associated eelgrass beds throughout Puget Sound by marine near-shore grantees and partners.

" Restoring shorelines through reduction of shoreline armoring is a strong element of this cooperative agreement. In addition to the above, armor reducing actions include funding:

ü Development of an incentives toolkit.

ü Five local projects to provide incentives for armor reduction work.

ü Development of a regional-hub website focused on "Shore Friendly" information and practices.

ü Outreach, education and ecological impacts monitoring components at three prior-funded armor removal sites.

" A "Social Marketing to Reduce Shoreline Armoring" project was completed and results have been well-received by the region. Data sharing agreements have been established with many organizations, and five awards were made to local entities for projects providing incentives to reduce shoreline armoring.

" Three sub-awards targeted at protecting bluff-backed beaches and other priority nearshore habitat will result in fully addressing one of the priority Near Term Actions of the Habitat Strategic Initiative to protect 10% of bluff-backed beaches in Puget Sound. These projects were selected and contracting was underway at the end of FY2014.

" 220 derelict fishing nets [total FY07-14 increment] have been recovered from Puget Sound, resulting in protection of over 48 acres of marine habitat. The Northwest Straits Foundation coordinates this program. The Foundation has designed and implemented a response and removal program for new and reported lost nets. There were 31 new, lost-net reports in FY14; investigations and reconnaissance found 16 derelict-gear nets that were removed from the environment.

" Two rain gardens were installed in Port Townsend's Uptown District in time to collect and filter storm-water runoff from winter storms. This project, sponsored by the Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee, WSU Extension and the City of Port Townsend targeted high-priority drainage areas where unfiltered storm-water flowed directly into the bay.

" Oil Spill Preparedness Workshops were sponsored by Marine Resource Committees and the Northwest Straits Foundation for northwest Puget Sound counties and communities.

" The Northwest Straits Commission has launched a citizen science initiative to monitor and protect kelp in northern Puget Sound.

" The Snohomish Marine Resource Committee worked with over 30 partners to develop a Conservation Action Plan for Port Susan identifying six strategies for ecosystem recovery in the Marine Stewardship Area (MSA). The final plan was adopted in 2012 and the MSA was officially designated by the Snohomish County Council in 2014.



Toxics and Nutrients Lead Organization

" ŹApproximately 1,216 pounds of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) were prevented from entering the environment annually by removing creosote piling and uncertified wood stoves. Based on the Puget Sound Toxics Assessment, PAHs are significant toxics entering the Sound. This grant funded implementation of the Puget Sound portion of Washington's PAH Chemical Action Plan (CAP) with activities such as:

ü Removal of 1,006 creosote treated pilings from Puget Sound in two pilot areas: Northern Hood Canal (Jefferson County) and the Chambers Creek (Pierce County) to protect spawning herring populations and reduce embryo mortality. NEP's cumulative investment for all removals and monitoring was approximately $967,000. Due to these successful pilots, the state legislature appropriated $2.5 million in 2014 to continue removals at other piling sites in Pierce County.

ü Funding of uncertified woodstove removals and change-outs in and around Washington's only Clean Air Act non-attainment area (greater Tacoma area). This has resulted in over 300 PAH-producing wood stoves being removed in this critical area to-date.

ü Reducing automotive leaks that are a major source of PAH pollution. The "Don't Drip and Drive" project provided hands-on training and spill kits to 1,120 partcipants at King County community colleges and at other regional locations to detect and prevent pollution from automotive leaks. Ecology also partnered with the Railway Tie Association to sample for PAH- runoff along regional railroad infrastructure, including establishment of source control options for creosote-treated ties.

" Local Source Control (LSC) specialists conducted 1,625 technical assistance visits to small businesses. Approximately 75% (1,219) had at least one hazardous materials or stormwater management issue. 88% (1,073) of problems identified were corrected. The visits targeted auto repair shops, medical and dental facilities, restaurants and gas stations. LSC specialists identified hazardous waste deposal and stormwater problems so that small businesses can fix them voluntarily to avoid potential monetary compliance and enforcement actions.

" Eleven local projects to implement nutrient reduction TMDLs are were started and concluded in 2014 or remain underway. Nine projects started in FFY14 are active in nutrient sensitive areas of Kitsap (2), Thurston (2), Whatcom (2), Mason (1), Pierce (1), and Snohmish (1) counties. Two FY14 projects in Mason and Thurston counties are finished.

" 169 products were tested under the Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) enforcement pilot project to ensrue compliance with bioaccumulative and other toxics bans in Washington. While it's illegal to sell specific products containing banned toxics, there had been no active enforcement to check if the bans were working before this project. This project purchased and tested items for chemicals, and communicated with retailers and manufacturers if toxics exceeding thresholds were found. Notices of correction were issued when appropriate. The project cost $219,000 and was instrumental in securing a 2014 state legislative approriation of over $1,000,000/biennium to expand and continue the program. The program provides testing and enforcement for Washington's Children's Safe Products Act, Toxics in Packaging Law, Bisphenol A (BPA) ban, and PBDE ban.

" Ecology has 56 ongoing projects to prevent and manage toxics and nutrient pollution in Puget Sound. Project selection was based on highest impact and most benefit resulting in several state-of-the art activities including:

ü 47 acre purchase of a former golf course (Oakland Bay/Mason County) to protect salmon habitat and shellfish beds from toxic and nutrient pollution.

ü Installation of two trial-level sanitary sewer denitrification systems (Hood Canal) to test for performance and feasability.

ü Removal of 900 piles and a 4,600 sq. ft. overwater structure at a former log-rafting site (northern Hood Canal).

ü Identification of safer products than commonly used toxic chemicals, including early steps to conduct product analyses using the "Interstate Chemicals Clearinghouse Alternatives Assessment Guide" especially to replace copper-based boat-bottom paint.

ü Conclusion of "Vehicle Drips and Leaks Education" project: 1,120 people received training to prevent leaks, discount coupons for leak repairs and how to use a spill kit.

ü Seattle Public Utilities pumped out 24,800 sq. ft. of storm drains nearly doubling their capacity to a cumulative total of 50,825 sq. ft. total pumped. 60 tons of sediments containing legacy-pollutants were removed - most drains have never been cleaned.



Managing Action Agenda Implementation  Puget Sound Partnership

* Performance Accountability -The Puget Sound Partnership's Project Atlas and Action Agenda Report Card have been launched and maintained with updates in FY2014.

These reporting tools help stakeholders, policy makers, and the public. The Project Atlas allows users to see the projects being done and the progress being made to restore Puget Sound. The Action Agenda Report Card provides a transparent and accessible way to gauge progress in implementing the Action Agenda by clearly showing essential milestones and performance measures, identifying the reason progress may not be on track, and identifying the corrective actions required.











Interagency Agreement Funding

" Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) techniques were assessed under NEP project funding to advance Puget Sound Basin stormwater management, permit and retrofit programs. New research by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and their partners (NOAA and Washington State University) looked at:

o Existing and future threats to salmon and their habitats from toxic stormwater runoff in urban watersheds, and

o Effectiveness of pollution reduction technologies (green stormwater infrastructure) as a strategy to improve water quality and enhance salmon survival. This work will help resource managers effectively protect the health of a Puget Sound ecosystem that is increasingly under pressure from human population growth, development, land cover change, climate change and degraded water quality from land-based stormwater runoff. The research showed bio-retention, such as soil infiltration via rain gardens downstream wetlands and floodplain areas is very effective in protecting the health of salmon and other aquatic species from harmful effects of toxic stormwater runoff. Fiscal Year 2015: No accomplishments to report with this year's funding since the incremental funding was awarded in late FFY2015. Fiscal Year 2016: No Current Data Available

 


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Federal Grants Resources