Puget Sound Protection and Restoration: Tribal Implementation Assistance Program

 

Puget Sound has been designated as one of 28 estuaries of National Significance under §320 of the Clean Water Act. The goal of the National Estuary Program is to attain and maintain water quality in designated estuaries that would assure protection of public water supplies and the protection and propagation of a balanced, indigenous population of shellfish, fish and wildlife and allows recreational activities in and on the water. The Puget Sound National Estuary Program's approved Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) is the Action Agenda. The goal of the Action Agenda is to restore and maintain the Puget Sound estuarine environment by 2020 so that it will support balanced indigenous populations of shellfish, fish and wildlife and support the extensive list of recognized uses of Puget Sound.

The EPA is committed to protecting and improving water quality and minimizing the adverse impacts of rapid development in the Puget Sound Basin. These commitments include protecting the watersheds and waters of Puget Sound by protecting the fundamental watershed processes that provide and create aquatic habitats and by reducing the generation and release of toxic, nutrient and pathogen pollution.

The Puget Sound Protection and Restoration: Tribal Implementation Assistance Program is aimed at assisting the Indian Tribes of the greater Puget Sound basin in their efforts to carry out work critically needed for Puget Sound protection and restoration. This work includes activities identified in, or consistent with, the Action Agenda such as efforts called for by established salmon recovery plans in the Puget Sound basin. EPA has a trust responsibility to Federally recognized Indian Tribes. EPA also recognizes that Federally recognized Indian Tribes in the greater Puget Sound basin have a critical role in the protection and restoration of the ecosystem and its resources. EPA seeks to provide financial assistance to these Tribes to help them implement priority strategies and actions in or consistent with the approved Clean Water Act §320 CCMP for Puget Sound.

Funding Prioritiy for FY 2014

Tribal Capacity ($3.950m, non-competitive)

Continued funding to support each Tribe and Consortium to participate in the Puget Sound Management Conference. Eligible tasks include identifying limiting factors to habitat protection and salmon and shellfish recovery.


Tribal Project Lead Organization ($2.490m; competitive)

Eligible subaward work includes watershed and marine/estuary habitat restoration projects. We anticipate that many of these projects will directly address salmon and shellfish recovery, consistent with the existing Tribal projects funded through the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission (NWIFC).

Funding Prioritiy for FY 2015: Tribal Capacity ($3.500m, non-competitive)



New capacity grants issued with FFY2015 funding to support each Tribe and Consortium to participate in the Puget Sound Management Conference. Eligible tasks include capacity building and other activities like identifying limiting factors to habitat protection and salmon and shellfish recovery.

Tribal Project Lead Organization ($2.490m; competitive)

Eligible subaward work includes watershed and marine/estuary habitat restoration projects. We anticipate that many of these projects will directly address salmon and shellfish recovery, consistent with the existing Tribal projects funded through the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission (NWIFC).

Funding Prioritiy for FY 2016: Depending on Congressional appropriations -

Tribal Capacity ( non-competitive)



Capacity grants issued with FFY2016 funding to support each Tribe and Consortium to participate in the Puget Sound Management Conference. Eligible tasks include capacity building and other activities like identifying limiting factors to habitat protection and salmon and shellfish recovery.



Tribal Project Lead Organization (new competition)



Eligible subaward work includes watershed and marine/estuary habitat restoration projects. We anticipate that many of these projects will directly address salmon and shellfish recovery, consistent with the existing Tribal projects funded through the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission (NWIFC).

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
66.121
Federal Agency/Office
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
Office: Region 10
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
Cooperative Agreements
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2014: As noted under Paragraphs [122] and [130] above; there are 3 funding streams under this program: 11 implementation awards; 22 capacity cooperative agreements; and a "lead organization" award under which multiple subawards are made each year.



The 11 implementation awards were unique and one-time awards; as representative accomplishments under those awards are described below:



The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe (USIT) completed a project to replace two fish passage barriers in the Red Creek (upper Skagit watershed) system, re-opening 1.5 miles of coho spawning and rearing habitat and restoring watershed processes critical to flood management goals. USIT, like other tribes, is a leader in complex restoration programs such as this that systematically address sediment, erosion, stream destabilization, fish habitat disruption, and downstream flooding problems.



Similarly, the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe (JSKT) has for 20 years worked collaboratively in the Dungeness and Sequim Bay watersheds to protect and restore ecosystem functions. NEP funding has allowed the Tribe to lead multiple on-the-ground efforts including completion of the signature Washington Harbor project that restored tidal hydrology and unimpeded fish access to 39 acres of estuarine habitat.



The Point No Point Treaty Council (PNPTC), working with multiple counties, tribes, and other entities, has created detailed riparian vegetation datasets that several Puget Sound counties, including Kitsap, Clallam, and Mason, are using within their Shoreline Master Program (SMP) processes. These data are instrumental in providing accurate and up-to-date information on riparian corridors and shoreline areas and are being used by the county regulatory agencies.



The Puyallup Tribe has been an extremely strong leader in addressing stormwater impacts in Clarks Creek, a vitally important tributary in the Puyallup River watershed utilized by six species of salmon. The Tribe has used NEP funding to reduce sediment, nutrient, and bacteria loads to Clarks Creek through the use of low-impact development and other measures. The stormwater issues addressed by the Tribe's work are endemic to most urban watersheds in the region and successful improvements here can be exported to other small urban catchments throughout the region.



The 22 capacity cooperative agreements are for 5-year projects and generally support ongoing projects.



Past and ongoing capacity funding enabled tribal staff to fulfill sound-wide coordinating and leadership roles in NEP Management Conference forums. Examples include:

— Three representatives (the Skokomish and Nisqually Tribes and the Lummi Nation) are funded through this program to participate and impart tribal perspectives on the Ecosystem Coordination Board the principal regional coordinating body of the Puget Sound NEP.

— The Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission is funded to coordinate and disseminate Management Conference information to all 17 Puget Sound tribes. This coordination has enabled Puget Sound tribes to participate in drafting and finalizing Tribal Habitat chapters of the Puget Sound Action Agenda.

— Tribal staff basin-wide fulfill advisory and leadership roles in their local integrating organizations, watershed and salmon recovery groups where high-priority Action Agenda items are implemented.

— Engagement in several local and regional planning processes, such as: Puget Sound Chinook Recovery Plan implementation; county and city Shoreline Master Program (ordinance) updates; County-level Pollution Identification and Correction programs (Jamestown S'Klallam); Vessel Traffic Risk Assessment (Makah); and, Local Integrating Organization engagement (multiple tribes).

— Tribes have engaged in large and small scale restoration planning efforts, including: Elwha Dam removal (Lower Elwha); Port Gamble Bay cleanup (Port Gamble S'Klallam); and Drayton Harbor shellfish beds recovery (Nooksack).

— Additional specific accomplishments include: Sponsoring the biennial South Sound Science Symposium (Squaxin Island); Chico Creek Watershed Assessment (Suquamish); and, Convening the Skagit Climate Science Consortium (Swinomish).



For further detail on projects funded under the "lead organization" program, reference the following site - http://blogs.nwifc.org/psp/files/



Additional tribal project accomplishments are in the process of being reported to NWIFC for this reporting period. They will be posted online to the website listed above. Fiscal Year 2015: Accomplishments for FFY2015 are not available at this time since funding was just awarded late in Fiscal Year 2014. Fiscal Year 2016: No Current Data Available
Authorization
Clean Water Act, Title III, Section 320, Public Law 94-117, 33 U.S.C 1330; Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, Public Law 111-8; Clean Water Act, Title III, Section 320, Public Law 106-457, 33 U.S.C 1330; Continuing Appropriations Act, 2012, Public Law 112-74; Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011, Public Law 111-242; Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, Public Law 113-6; Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014, Public Law 113-76.
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
All federally recognized Indian Tribes located within the greater Puget Sound basin, and any consortium of these eligible Tribes, may apply for funding under the program. The greater Puget Sound basin is defined as all watersheds draining to the U.S. waters of Puget Sound, southern Georgia Basin, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

An eligible Intertribal consortium is one that demonstrates that: 1) a majority of its members meet the eligibility requirements for this program; 2) all members that meet the eligibility requirements authorize the consortium to apply for and receive the grant; and 3) only members that meet the eligibility requirements will benefit directly from the grant project and the consortium agrees to a grant condition to that effect.

An Intertribal consortium must have adequate documentation of the existence of the partnership and the authorization of the member Tribes to apply for and receive assistance. Documentation that demonstrates the existence of the partnership of Indian Tribal governments may consist of Tribal council resolutions, Intertribal consortia resolutions in conjunction with a Tribal council resolution from each member Tribe, or other written certification from a duly authorized representative of each Tribal government that clearly demonstrates that a partnership of Indian Tribal governments exists. Documentation that demonstrates that member Tribes authorize the consortium to apply for and receive assistance may consist of a Tribal council resolution from each Tribe or other written certification from a duly authorized representative of each Tribal government that clearly demonstrates that the Tribe authorizes the consortium to apply for and receive the grant on behalf of the Tribe. An Intertribal consortium resolution is not adequate documentation of the member Tribes' authorization of the consortium unless it includes a written certification from a duly authorized representative of each Tribal government.

Federal and state agencies, institutions of higher learning, units of local government, special purpose districts, conservation districts, watershed planning units organized pursuant to RCW 90.82.040 and 060, local management boards organized pursuant to RCW 90.88.030, salmon recovery lead entities organized pursuant to RCW 77.85.050, regional fisheries enhancement group organized pursuant to RCW 77.95.060 and nongovernmental entities are not eligible to directly receive financial assistance awards under this announcement. Business enterprises and individuals or families will also not be eligible applicants.

However, EPA strongly encourages eligible applicants to solicit participation from these types of entities as local collaborators. All of these types of entities are eligible to apply for subawards or subcontracts from a successful award recipient.

For certain competitive funding opportunities under this CFDA description, the Agency may limit eligibility to compete to a number or subset of eligible applicants consistent with the Agency's Assistance Agreement Competition Policy.
Beneficiary Eligibility
The beneficiary of this assistance under this program would be the Federally recognized Indian Tribes or the consortia of these Tribes that receive the assistance. Ultimate beneficiaries would include the tribal members and the general public (due to the general public's interest in restoring and protecting the resources of Puget Sound).
Credentials/Documentation
OMB Circular A-87 has been codified at 2 C.F.R. Part 225. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
Regarding pre-application/pre-proposal assistance with respect to competitive funding opportunities under this program description, EPA will generally specify the nature of the pre-application/pre-proposal assistance, if any, that will be available to applicants in the competitive announcement. For additional information, contact the individual(s) listed as "Information Contacts" or see Appendix IV of the Catalog.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372. The State of Washington has chosen to not participate in this review process. Environmental impact information is not required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Applicants will be required to submit application materials as described in the Request For Proposals. The Request For Proposals will also specify the submission methods which generally include an electronic and hard copy submission option. The standard application forms as furnished by the EPA and required by 2 CFR Parts 200 and 1500 must be used for this program. EPA requires final applications to be made on Standard Form 424. Requests for application kits must be submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency, Grants and Interagency Agreement Management Division, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Mail Code 3903R, Washington, DC 20460 or though the EPA Region 10 Grants Administration web site at: http://www.epa.gov/pugetsound/index.html. Applicants may be able to use http://www.grants.gov to electronically apply for certain grant opportunities under this CFDA.


Award Procedure
For competitive awards, EPA will review and evaluate applications, proposals, and/or submissions in accordance with the terms, conditions, and criteria stated in the competitive announcement. Competitions will be conducted in accordance with EPA policies/regulations for competing assistance agreements. EPA reserves the right to reject all applications and make no awards under any RFP issued under this program.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
The Region expects that its review of the applications received in response to competitive solicitations will be completed within 120 to 150 days following the deadline for the submission of applications for each Request for Proposals issued under this program.
Appeals
Assistance agreement competition-related disputes will be resolved in accordance with the dispute resolution procedures published in 70 FR (Federal Register) 3629, 3630 (January 26, 2005). Copies of these procedures may also be requested by contacting the individual(s) listed as "Information Contacts." Disputes relating to matters other than the competitive selection of recipients will be resolved under 40 CFR 30.63 or 40 CFR 31.70, as applicable.
Renewals
Not Applicable.
How are proposals selected?
The evaluation and selection criteria for competitive awards under this CFDA description will be published in the announcement of the competitive funding opportunity (the Request for Proposals or RFP).
How may assistance be used?
This assistance may be used by Tribes to plan for and implement work that is critically needed for Puget Sound restoration and protection. Such work includes priority actions or strategies in or consistent with the approved §320 CCMP for Puget Sound including, but not limited to, projects called for by established salmon recovery plans, except where the proposed work is inconsistent with applicable Federal law, regulation or published EPA policy.

Additional information on use restrictions, if any, for the Puget Sound Protection and Restoration: Tribal Implementation Assistance Program, will be provided in each request for proposals published on the EPA Region 10 website.

Assistance agreement awards under this program may involve or relate to geospatial information. Further information regarding geospatial information may be obtained by viewing the following website: http://geodata.epa.gov.

Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to adopt and enforce policies that ban text messaging while driving company-owned or -rented vehicles or government-owned vehicles, or while driving privately-owned vehicles when on official government business or when performing any work for or on behalf of the government. Grant recipients and sub-recipients are encouraged to conduct initiatives of the type described in section 3(a) of the Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging While Driving Executive Order that was signed on October 1, 2009.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
No program reports are required. No cash reports are required. Progress report requirements will be a part of each assistance agreement. A schedule of interim milestones and the outputs that will be completed by the end of the project period will also be included. Progress reports will typically discuss the progress that has been made on each major task and on each interim milestone identified in the approved statement of work. Progress reports will also discuss any difficulties or problems that have been encountered and how they have been or are being resolved. Other specific reporting requirements will be defined in the assistance agreement based on the statement of work described in the application. Expenditure reports will typically be required at the same time intervals as progress reports. The expenditure reports will document expenditures to date, including expenditures of any matching funds, in a manner that allows the report user to confirm that matching requirements, if any, are being met and that all assistance payments (disbursements to assistance recipients) are for costs that have been incurred in compliance with applicable costs principles. Recipients of this funding will be required to use EPA's Puget Sound Financial and Ecosystem Accounting Tracking System (FEATS), which is the primary mechanism for performance monitoring. Key grant outputs will be tracked on a semi-annual basis through FEATS, as well as progress towards project milestones and deliverables. FEATS provides linkages to EPA Puget Sound performance measures and Dashboard Indicators. FEATS allows award recipients to share challenges, solutions, lessons learned, and reflections associated with their work.
Auditing
In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. Grants and cooperative agreements are subject to inspections and audits by the Comptroller General of the United States, the EPA Office of Inspector General, other EPA staff, or any authorized representative of the Federal government. Reviews by the EPA Project Officer and the Grants Specialist may occur each year.
Records
Financial records, including all documents to support entries on accounting records and to substantiate charges to each grant must be kept available to personnel authorized to examine EPA grant accounts. All records must be maintained until expiration of 3 years from the date of submission of the final expenditure report. If questions still remain, such as those raised by an audit, related records should be maintained until the matter is completely resolved.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
This program has no statutory formula.
Matching Requirements: The Puget Sound Protection and Restoration: Tribal Implementation Assistance program has no statutory formula for allocating the funds. All of the assistance agreements will be for planning and implementation projects under the Puget Sound Comprehensive Conservation Management Plan (CCMP) under CWA §320(g)(2) and §320(g)(3)(ii). There is a statutory match of 50% of the total project costs for assistance agreements under CWA §320(g)(3)(ii) and CWA Section 320 allows for an aggregate match.

For the awards to be made under this program, the Puget Sound Management Conference, represented by the Puget Sound Partnership, has agreed to provide all of the required non-federal match for successful project proposals for FFY 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,2014, and 2015 under a separate cooperative agreement with EPA. Accordingly, eligible applicants will not be required to provide any of the required non-federal match.

For the FY2016 competitive lead organization grant, please check the Request for Proposals for information on the match requirement for this grant proposal.
This program does not have MOE requirements.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
The assistance was awarded for FFY2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and will be awarded during FFY2015. Funds will be disbursed to assistance recipients in accordance with the terms specified in their respective assistance agreements.

Depending on the congressional appropriation for FFY2016, new funding for a Tribal lead organization cooperative agreement will be awarded. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Assistance will be disbursed in accordance with the terms of each assistance agreement. Typically, assistance recipients draw funds at either monthly or quarterly intervals based on their incurred costs.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
See Regional Agency Offices. Angela Bonifaci, Team Leader
Puget Sound Team
Office of Ecosystems, Tribal and Public Affairs
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10
1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite 900, ETPA-086
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 553-0332 or 1-800-424-4EPA, extension 3-0332
E-Mail: bonifaci.angela@epa.gov.
Headquarters Office
Angela Bonifaci Puget Sound Team
Office of Ecosystems, Tribal and Public Affairs
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10
1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite 900, ETPA-086

, Seattle, Washington 98101 Email: bonifaci.angela@epa.gov Phone: (206) 553-0332
Website Address
http://www.epa.gov/pugetsound/funding/index.html
Financial Information
Account Identification
68-0108-0-1-304.
Obligations
(Cooperative Agreements) FY 14 $2,490,000; FY 15 est $3,500,000; and FY 16 Estimate Not Available - EPA has made three distinct categories of awards under this CFDA program:

1) FFY 2009 ($5M) and FFY 2010 (0.33M) funds were competitively awarded to 13 Tribes for projects to protect and restore Puget Sound.



2) FFY 2010 funds ($3M) were competitively awarded to the Lead Organization for Puget Sound recovery tribal implementation projects. An additional $5.48M in incremental funding was added to this assistance agreement in FFY 2011, $3.6M in FFY2012, $3.621M in FFY2013, $2.490M in FFY2014, and $2.490 in FFY2015.



3) FFY 2010 funds ($3,75M) were awarded to the 19 federally recognized Puget Sound Tribes and three tribal consortia to help build their capacity to engage with the Management Conference on efforts to protect and restore Puget Sound. An additional $4M in incremental funding was added to these assistance agreements in FFY 2011, $4M in FY2012, and $3.950M in FFY2013. In FFY2014, an additional $3.950M was added to these assistance agreements.



In FFY2015, new capacity agreements are being approved for the 19 federally recognized Puget Sound Tribes and three tribal consortia in the amount of $3.500M.



Funding for FFY 2016 is unknown as this time.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
$150,000 - $160,563 with three Tribes receiving an extra $50,000 for Puget Sound Ecosystems Coordination Board participation. In past years, the average capacity award for individual tribes and consortia has been ~$150,000.

For the Tribal Lead Organization grant, the funding has ranged from $2.490M to $5.48M.
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
For grants and cooperative agreements with local governments, tribal governments and special purpose districts, the procedures and requirements should be in conformance with the OMB's Uniform Grants Guidance (UGG) located in 2 CFR 200 (Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards). This supercedes and streamlines requirements from 40 C.F.R. Part 31 "Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments", and OMB Circular Nos. A-21, A-87, A-110, and A-122 (which had been placed in 2 CFR 220, 225, 215, and 230).

40 C.F.R. Part 35 "Environmental Program Grants-State, Interstate and Local Government Agencies" is still applicable.
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2014: As noted under Paragraphs 122 and 131bove; there are 3 funding streams under this program: 11 implementation awards; 22 capacity cooperative agreements; and a "lead organization" award under which multiple subawards are made each year.



The 11 implementation awards were unique and one-time awards; as representative accomplishments under those awards are described below:



The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe (USIT) completed a project to replace two fish passage barriers in the Red Creek (upper Skagit watershed) system, re-opening 1.5 miles of coho spawning and rearing habitat and restoring watershed processes critical to flood management goals. USIT, like other tribes, is a leader in complex restoration programs such as this that systematically address sediment, erosion, stream destabilization, fish habitat disruption, and downstream flooding problems.



Similarly, the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe (JSKT) has for 20 years worked collaboratively in the Dungeness and Sequim Bay watersheds to protect and restore ecosystem functions. NEP funding has allowed the Tribe to lead multiple on-the-ground efforts including completion of the signature Washington Harbor project that restored tidal hydrology and unimpeded fish access to 39 acres of estuarine habitat.



The Point No Point Treaty Council (PNPTC), working with multiple counties, tribes, and other entities, has created detailed riparian vegetation datasets that several Puget Sound counties, including Kitsap, Clallam, and Mason, are using within their Shoreline Master Program (SMP) processes. These data are instrumental in providing accurate and up-to-date information on riparian corridors and shoreline areas and are being used by the county regulatory agencies.



The Puyallup Tribe has been an extremely strong leader in addressing stormwater impacts in Clarks Creek, a vitally important tributary in the Puyallup River watershed utilized by six species of salmon. The Tribe has used NEP funding to reduce sediment, nutrient, and bacteria loads to Clarks Creek through the use of low-impact development and other measures. The stormwater issues addressed by the Tribe's work are endemic to most urban watersheds in the region and successful improvements here can be exported to other small urban catchments throughout the region.



The 22 capacity cooperative agreements are for 5-year projects and generally support ongoing projects.



Past and ongoing capacity funding enabled tribal staff to fulfill sound-wide coordinating and leadership roles in NEP Management Conference forums. Examples include:

— Three representatives (the Skokomish and Nisqually Tribes and the Lummi Nation) are funded through this program to participate and impart tribal perspectives on the Ecosystem Coordination Board the principal regional coordinating body of the Puget Sound NEP.

— The Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission is funded to coordinate and disseminate Management Conference information to all 17 Puget Sound tribes. This coordination has enabled Puget Sound tribes to participate in drafting and finalizing Tribal Habitat chapters of the Puget Sound Action Agenda.

— Tribal staff basin-wide fulfill advisory and leadership roles in their local integrating organizations, watershed and salmon recovery groups where high-priority Action Agenda items are implemented.

— Engagement in several local and regional planning processes, such as: Puget Sound Chinook Recovery Plan implementation; county and city Shoreline Master Program (ordinance) updates; County-level Pollution Identification and Correction programs (Jamestown S'Klallam); Vessel Traffic Risk Assessment (Makah); and, Local Integrating Organization engagement (multiple tribes).

— Tribes have engaged in large and small scale restoration planning efforts, including: Elwha Dam removal (Lower Elwha); Port Gamble Bay cleanup (Port Gamble S'Klallam); and Drayton Harbor shellfish beds recovery (Nooksack).

— Additional specific accomplishments include: Sponsoring the biennial South Sound Science Symposium (Squaxin Island); Chico Creek Watershed Assessment(Suquamish); and, Convening the Skagit Climate Science Consortium (Swinomish).





For further detail on projects funded under the "lead organization" program, reference the following site - http://blogs.nwifc.org/psp/files/.

Additional tribal project accomplishments are in the process of being reported to NWIFC for this reporting period. They will be posted online to the website listed above. Fiscal Year 2015: No projects to report with this year funding since the incremental funding will be awarded in late FFY2015. Fiscal Year 2016: No Current Data Available

 


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