Preservation of Japanese American Confinement Sites

 

To provide for the preservation and interpretation of historic confinement sites where Japanese Americans were detained during World War II. The program was established to encourage projects that identify, research, evaluate, interpret, protect, restore, repair, and acquire historic confinement sites in order that present and future generations may learn and gain inspiration from these sites and that these sites will demonstrate the Nation's commitment to equal justice under the law.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
15.933
Federal Agency/Office
Agency: Department of the Interior
Office: National Park Service
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
Project Grants
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2014: Financial assistance was provided to 25 entities, including political subdivisions, universities and non-profit organizations. Fiscal Year 2015: No information available. Fiscal Year 2016: No information available.
Authorization
Preservation of Japanese American Confinement Sites Act, Public Law 109-441, 120 Stat. 3288, 16 U.S.C 461 and Public Law 111-88.
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
Applicant may be State and local agencies, public or private nonprofit institutions/organizations, Federally recognized Indian tribal governments, State colleges and universities, public and private colleges and universities.
Beneficiary Eligibility
State and local agencies, public and private nonprofit institutions/organizations, Federally recognized Indian tribal governments, State colleges and universities, public and private colleges and universities.
Credentials/Documentation
Applicant must submit proof of applicant's
governmental, non-profit or institutional status;
a letter from the owner giving consent to the
grant applicant as the grantee of record to
undertake work on the property or collection (if
applicable).
2 CFR, Part 200, 43 CFR, OMB Circulars,
standard forms, and program information. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
Preapplication coordination is not applicable. Environmental impact information is not required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Annual announcements will provide detailed information on proposal procedures and submission requirements. Required forms include the DI-2010 “Certifications Regarding Debarment, Suspension and Other Responsibility Matters, Drug-Free Workplace Requirements and Lobbying”; SF 424 Application for Federal Assistance; SF 424A Budget Information (Non-Construction Programs); SF 424B Assurances (Non-Construction Programs); SF 424C Budget Information (Construction); and SF 424D Assurances (Construction).
Award Procedure
Eligible applications and accompanying documentation will be reviewed by the Japanese American Confinement Sites Grants Selection Panel, a panel of Federal agency experts representing applicable preservation, history, education, and conservation disciplines. The panel will provide recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior for final project selection. The panel's recommendations will be approved by the Secretary of Interior through an apportionment process. Grants will be awarded by NPS directly to selected grantees. The NPS and grant recipient will execute a grant agreement.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
60 to 120 days.
Appeals
Not Applicable.
Renewals
Not Applicable.
How are proposals selected?
A. Need:
i.A critical problem exists and needs to be addressed.
ii.The desired outcome is identified and the project addresses the critical problem
with an appropriate solution.

B. Impact:
i.The project will have an impact(s) on the interpretation and/or preservation of the confinement site experience and will reach an audience. The project impact(s) will be widespread and the project will be publicized and shared with others.
ii.Public Law 109-441 (16 USC 461) – the grant program’s authorizing legislation –
states that the program was created for the purpose of identifying, researching, evaluating, interpreting, protecting, restoring, repairing, and acquiring historic confinement sites in order that present and future generations may learn and gain inspiration from these sites and that these sites will demonstrate the Nation’s commitment to equal justice under the law. The project meets the purpose of the grant program’s authorizing legislation, and addresses how these messages will be conveyed and shared with the public.

C. Feasibility: The applicant has the ability to successfully complete the project.

i.The project budget is reasonable.
ii.Selected personnel have the qualifications and ability to complete the project in a
timely and professional manner.
iii.The project will be effectively managed and completed.


D. Sustainability: The project will be sustained over time. The applicant demonstrates the
ability for long-term maintenance, operation, distribution, and/or follow-up of the project.

E. Support: The project has support and participation from former internees, stakeholders, and/or the public.
How may assistance be used?
Japanese American Confinement Sites grant funds may be used for identifying, researching, evaluating, interpreting, protecting, restoring, repairing, and acquiring historic confinement sites where Japanese Americans were detained during World War II as authorized by the Preservation of Japanese American Confinement Sites Act of 2006. These historic confinement sites are defined as the ten War Relocation Authority internment camps (Gila River, Granada, Heart Mountain, Jerome, Manzanar, Minidoka, Poston, Rohwer, Topaz, and Tule Lake), as well as other historically significant locations, as determined by the Secretary of the Interior, where Japanese Americans were detained during World War II. These sites are specifically identified in Confinement and Ethnicity: An Overview of World War II Japanese American Relocation Sites, published by the Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Western Archaeological and Conservation Center, in 1999. For further information, Please contact the Regional Office.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
Program reports are not applicable. Cash reports are not applicable. Grantees are required to report both financial and progress reports on a semi-annual basis. Products of the grant will be reviewed in draft and final format. Final performance reports are expected at the close of the grant. SF 425 Federal Financial Report as specified in the award and SF 270 Request for Advance or Reimbursement must be submitted to the NPS Grant Awarding Official for approval of payment requests. Final financial reports must be submitted. SF 425 Federal Financial Report as specified in the award and SF 270 Request for Advance or Reimbursement must be submitted to the NPS Grant Awarding Official for approval of payment requests. Final financial reports must be submitted. Performance monitoring is not applicable.
Auditing
In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503.
Records
Per 2 CFR Part 200.333 – 200.337.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
Statutory formulas are not applicable to this program.
Matching Requirements: Each grant requires a 2:1 Federal to non-Federal match; that is, to receive two dollars of Federal funds at least one dollar non-Federal match is required. The match may be composed of cash or in-kind contributions. The non-Federal match may be raised and spent during the grant period; it does not have to be "in the bank" at the time of application.
MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
1-2 years will be the typical duration of funded awards. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Assistance released on a reimbursable basis as costs are incurred.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
See Regional Agency Offices. Kara Miyagishima, NPS - Intermountain Regional Office, Phone (303) 969-2885, Email: Kara_Miyagishima@nps.gov.
Headquarters Office
Kara Miyagishima, National Park Service - Intermountain Regional Office, 12795 W. Alameda Parkway, Lakewood, Colorado 80228 Email: Kara_Miyagishima@nps.gov Phone: (303) 969-2885.
Website Address
http://www.nps.gov/history/hps/hpg/JACS/index.html
Financial Information
Account Identification
14-1042-0-2-303.
Obligations
(Project Grants) FY 14 $2,815,147; FY 15 est $3,000,000; and FY 16 est $3,000,000
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
Range: $16,000.00 - $500,000.00
Average: $150,000.00.
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
Department of the Interior Administrative, Audit Requirements and Cost Principles for Assistance Programs, 43 CFR Part 12.

Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant website: http://www.nps.gov/history/hps/HPG/JACS/index.html
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2014: Since it began, the program has awarded nearly $10 million in grants for projects in 11 states.
Examples of funded projects include:
■Rohwer Relocation Camp Cemetery
Preservation (Arkansas)—stabilization and restoration of grave markers in the camp cemetery, a National Historic Landmark.
■ Poston Preservation Project (Arizona)— relocation and rehabilitation one of the barracks at the Colorado River Relocation Center.
■ The Registry: A Documentary Film about the Military Intelligence Service Language School in Minnesota—a documentary about Japanese Americans who served as interrogators, interpreters, and linguists with the Military Intelligence Service during World
War II.
■ Kooskia Internment Camp Archaeological Project (Idaho)—archeological survey of camp structures and landscape features; public outreach on survey findings.
■ Heart Mountain Interpretive Learning Center(Wyoming)—exhibits, recreated structures, online tours, and interactive K-12 curricula to engage visitors and students in the lives of Japanese Americans confined to the camp.
■ Teach the Teachers (multiple sites)—a
curriculum package and teacher workshops to enhance student learning about the incarceration of Japanese Americans.
■ From Barbed Wire to Barbed Hooks (California)—this documentary tells the story of Manzanar internees who sought moments of freedom by crawling under the relocation center’s barbed wire fences to go trout fishing in nearby streams and alpine lakes.
■ Stone Ishimaru’s War Relocation Authority
Camp Images Archive (multiple sites)—
preservation and digital conversion of
approximately 5,000 photographic negatives taken by the former internee and camp photographer at 10 relocation centers. Fiscal Year 2015: No information available. Fiscal Year 2016: No information available.

 



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