A Comprehensive Approach to Good Health and Wellness in Indian County - financed solely by Prevention and Public Health

 

This five-year funding opportunity offers support to prevent heart disease, diabetes and associated risk factors in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities through a holistic approach to population health and wellness. There will be two components to this funding opportunity announcement.

Component One will fund 12 AI/AN tribes, one within each of the 12 Indian Health Service (IHS) areas, who will use a combination of community chosen and culturally adapted policies, systems, and environmental changes to increase access to fresh, healthy traditional foods, and offer alternatives to less healthy packaged and processed foods high in sodium and fat. Component One will also strive to promote programs to increase physical activity, health education, and team based strategies to strengthen community-clinical linkages promoting lifelong health and preventing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Awardees will customize environmental approaches for their communities to foster sustainability, broaden community and cross-sector partnerships, and demonstrate population change to promote health and reduce risk factors that lead to chronic disease.

Component Two awardees will be Tribal organizations, as set forth in 25 U.S.C., Section 1603, and other Tribal-Serving Organizations. Twelve Tribal Organizations will receive funding (no more than one in each Area) to provide Technical Assistance, Training, and Resources to AI/AN tribes and villages within their IHS areas to promote community chosen and culturally adapted policies, systems, and environmental changes. These changes will lead to sustainable increased access to fresh, healthy traditional foods, decreased access to less healthy packaged and processed foods, increased physical activity, health education, as well as strengthened community-clinical linkages to promote lifelong health and prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
93.762
Federal Agency/Office
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
Office: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
Cooperative Agreements
Program Accomplishments
Not Applicable.
Authorization
Sections 301(a) and 317 (k) of the Public Health Service Act, {42 U.S.C. section 241(a) and 247 (k) and Title IV Section 4002 Prevention and Public Health Fund. Public Service Act.
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
Eligibility:
Federally recognized American Indian Tribes and Alaska Native Villages and Corporations which meet the definition set forth in 25 U.S.C. Section 1603.
Tribal organizations, as set forth in 25 U.S.C. Section 1603.
Urban Indian Organizations that meet the definition set forth in 25 U.S.C., section 1603.
Tribal college or university as set forth in section 1059c (b) of title 20.
Tribal epidemiology Centers as set forth in 25 U.S.C. Section 1621m.
Beneficiary Eligibility
Federally recognized Indian Tribal Government, Individual/Family, Native American Organization, Pre-school, infant, Child, Youth, Senior Citizen, unemployed, welfare recipient, pension recipient, moderate income, low income, rural.
Credentials/Documentation
Applicants should document the need for assistance, state the objectives of the project, outline the method of operations, describe evaluation procedures, and provide a budget with justification of funds requested. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
Preapplication coordination is required. Environmental impact information is not required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Application Procedure
2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. a.Data Universal Numbering System: All applicant organizations must obtain a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number. A DUNS number is a unique nine-digit identification number provided by Dun & Bradstreet (D&B). It will be used as the Universal Identifier when applying for federal awards or cooperative agreements.

The applicant organization may request a DUNS number by telephone at 1-866-705-5711 (toll free) or internet at http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform/displayHomePage.do. The DUNS number will be provided at no charge.

If funds are awarded to an applicant organization that includes sub-awardees, those sub-awardees must provide their DUNS numbers before accepting any funds.
b.System for Award Management (SAM): The SAM is the primary registrant database for the federal government and the repository into which an entity must submit information required to conduct business as an awardee. All applicant organizations must register with SAM, and will be assigned a SAM number. All information relevant to the SAM number must be current at all times during which the applicant has an application under consideration for funding by CDC. If an award is made, the SAM information must be maintained until a final financial report is submitted or the final payment is received, whichever is later. The SAM registration process usually requires not more than five business days, and registration must be renewed annually. Additional information about registration procedures may be found at www.SAM.gov.
c.Grants.gov: The first step in submitting an application online is registering your organization at www.grants.gov, the official HHS E-grant Web site. Registration information is located at the “Get Registered” option at www.grants.gov.

All applicant organizations must register at www.grants.gov. The one-time registration process usually takes not more than five days to complete. Applicants must start the registration process as early as possible.

2.Request Application Package: Applicants may access the application package at www.grants.gov.

3.Application Package: Applicants must download the SF-424, Application for Federal Assistance, package associated with this funding opportunity at www.grants.gov. If Internet access is not available, or if the online forms cannot be accessed, applicants may call the CDC PGO staff at 770-488-2700 or e-mail PGO PGOTIM@cdc.gov for assistance. Persons with hearing loss may access CDC telecommunications at TTY 1-888-232-6348.
Award Procedure
Awardees will receive an electronic copy of the Notice of Award (NoA) from CDC PGO. The NoA shall be the only binding, authorizing document between the awardee and CDC. The NoA will be signed by an authorized GMO and e-mailed to the awardee program director.

Any applicant awarded funds in response to this FOA will be subject to the DUNS, SAM Registration, and Federal Funding Accountability And Transparency Act Of 2006 (FFATA) requirements.

Unsuccessful applicants will receive notification of these results by e-mail with delivery receipt or by U.S. mail.
Deadlines
Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
From 120 to 180 days.
Appeals
Not Applicable.
Renewals
From 120 to 180 days. Renewals will be based upon availability of funding and satisfactory programmatic progress. Project period is for 5 years with 12 month budget periods.
How are proposals selected?
All applications will be reviewed initially for completeness by CDC PGO staff and will be reviewed jointly for eligibility by the CDC/NCCDPHP and PGO. Incomplete applications and applications that do not meet the eligibility criteria will not advance to Phase II review. Applicants will be notified that their applications did not meet eligibility or published submission requirements.
A review panel will evaluate complete, eligible applications for Component 1 in accordance with the “Criteria” section of the FOA.

A review panel will evaluate complete, eligible applications for Component 2 in accordance with the “Criteria” section of the FOA.

Not more than thirty days after the Phase II review is completed, applicants will be notified electronically if their application does not meet eligibility or published submission requirements.
How may assistance be used?
Component One awardees can potentially use assistance to apply a combination of community chosen and culturally adapted policies, systems, and environmental changes to increase access to fresh, healthy traditional foods and healthy beverages, such as water, and offer alternatives to less healthy packaged, processed foods high in sodium and fat, and less healthy beverages. Component One will also implement policy, systems, and environmental changes that increase physical activity, health education, and team-based strategies to strengthen community-clinical linkages promoting lifelong health and preventing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Awardees will customize environmental approaches for their communities to foster sustainability, broaden community and cross-sector partnerships, and demonstrate target/intended population change to promote health and reduce risk factors that lead to chronic disease.

Component Two awardees can potentially use assistance to provide Technical Assistance, Training, and Resources (including funding for contracts with designated area tribes or villages) to AI/AN tribes and villages within their IHS areas to promote community chosen and culturally adapted policies, systems, and environmental changes. These changes will lead to sustainable increased access to fresh, healthy traditional foods and beverages, decreased access to less healthy processed foods and beverages, increased physical activity, reduced commercial tobacco use, health education, as well as strengthened community-clinical linkages to promote lifelong health and prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Applicants must submit an itemized budget narrative, which may be scored as part of the Organizational Capacity of Awardees to Execute the Approach. When developing the budget narrative, applicants must consider whether the proposed budget is reasonable and consistent with the purpose, outcomes, and program strategy outlined in the project narrative. The budget must include:
Salaries and wages
Fringe benefits
Consultant costs
Equipment
Supplies
Travel
Other categories
Total Direct costs
Total Indirect costs
Contractual costs. Restrictions that must be considered while planning the programs and writing the budget are:
•Awardees may not use funds for research.
•Awardees may not use funds for clinical care.
•Awardees may use funds only for reasonable program purposes, including personnel, travel, supplies, and services.
•Generally, awardees may not use funds to purchase furniture or equipment. Any such proposed spending must be clearly identified in the budget.
•Reimbursement of pre-award costs is not allowed.
•Other than for normal and recognized executive-legislative relationships, no funds may be used for:
opublicity or propaganda purposes, for the preparation, distribution, or use of any material designed to support or defeat the enactment of legislation before any legislative body
othe salary or expenses of any grant or contract recipient, or agent acting for such recipient, related to any activity designed to influence the enactment of legislation, appropriations, regulation, administrative action, or Executive order proposed or pending before any legislative body
•The direct and primary recipient in a cooperative agreement program must perform a substantial role in carrying out project outcomes and not merely serve as a conduit for an award to another party or provider who is ineligible.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
Semi-annual reports from each entity awarded a cooperative agreement or contract, summarizing the activities undertaken and identifying any sub-grants or sub-contracts awarded (including the purpose of the award and the identity of the recipient), to be posted not later than 30 days after the end of each 6-month period. Congress directed HHS to provide information on activities and programs supported with resources from the Prevention and Public Health Fund (PPHF) to a public website.
http://www.hhs.gov/open/records and reports/prevention/index.html. No cash reports are required. Reporting provided continuous program monitoring and identifies success and challenges that
awardees encounter throughout the project period. Also, reporting is a requirement for awardees who want to apply for yearly continuation of funding. Awardees must submit an Annual Performance Report via www.grants.gov 120 days before the end of the budget period. The report must not exceed 45 pages excluding administrative reporting; attachments are not allowed, but Web links are allowed. This report must include the following: performance measures, evaluation results, work
plan, successes, challenges, DC program support needs, and administrative reporting. The annual FFR form (SF-425) is required and must be submitted through eRA Commons within 90 days after each budget period ends. The report must include only those funds authorized and disbursed during the timeframe covered by the report. The final report must indicate the exact balance of unobligated funds, and may not reflect any unliquidated obligations. The final FFR expenditure data and the Payment Management System’s (PMS) cash transaction data must correspond; no discrepancies between the data sets are permitted. Failure to submit the required information by the due date may affect adversely the future funding of the project. If the information cannot be provided by the due date, awardees are required to submit a letter of explanation and include the date by which the information will be provided. Awardees must provide a more detailed evaluation and performance measurement plan within the first six months of the project. This more detailed plan must be developed by awardees as part of first-year project activities, with support from CDC. This more detailed plan must build on the elements stated in the initial plan, and must be no more than 25 pages. At a minimum, and in addition to the elements of the initial plan, this plan must:
Indicate the frequency that evaluation and performance data are to be collected.
•Describe how data will be reported.
•Describe how evaluation findings will be used to ensure continuous quality and program improvement.
•Describe how evaluation and performance measurement will yield findings that will demonstrate the value of the FOA (e.g., effect on improving public health outcomes, effectiveness of FOA as it pertains to performance measurement, cost-effectiveness, or cost-benefit).
•Describe dissemination channels and audiences (including public dissemination).
•Describe other information requested and as determined by the CDC program.
When developing evaluation and performance measurement plans, applicants are encouraged to use the Introduction to Program Evaluation for Public Health Programs: A Self-Study Guide, available at: http://www.cdc.gov/eval/guide/index.htm.
Auditing
In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503.
Records
Financial records, supporting documents, statistical records, and all other records pertinent to the project must be kept readily available for review by personnel authorized to examine PHS grant accounts. Records must be maintained for a minimum of 3 years after the end of the budget period. If questions still remain, such as those raised as a result of an audit, records must be retained until completion or resolution of any audit in process or pending resolution. Property records must be retained in accordance with PGS Grants Policy Statement requirements.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
This program has no statutory formula.
This program has no matching requirements.
This program does not have MOE requirements.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
Five year projject period with 12 month budget periods. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: lump sum.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
None.
Headquarters Office
Beth Patterson 4770 Buford Hwy, MS –F80, Atlanta, Georgia 30341 Email: erp2@cdc.gov Phone: 770-488-6045
Website Address
http://www.cdc.gov
Financial Information
Account Identification
75-0943-0-1-550.
Obligations
(Cooperative Agreements) FY 14 $10,429,229; FY 15 est $14,000,000; and FY 16 Estimate Not Available
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
Anticipated amounts are: FY2014: $13-15 million; $14-15m per year with $65075 million over the five years; average annual award $500,000, range $300,000-$800,000.
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
92 CFR Parts 215 and 220 Cost Principles for Educational Institutions (OMB Circular A-21) and OMB Circular No. A-122 for nonprofit organizations and Congress directed HHS guidance/requirements regarding terms and conditions and reporting requirements for recipients of programs supported with resources from the Prevention and Public Health Fund
Examples of Funded Projects
Not Applicable.

 



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