National Fire Plan - Wildland Urban Interface Community Fire Assistance

 

To implement the National Fire Plan and assist communities at risk from catastrophic wildland fires by providing assistance in the following areas: Provide community programs that develop local capability including; assessment and planning, mitigation activities, and community and homeowner education and action; plan and implement hazardous fuels reduction activities, including the training, monitoring or maintenance associated with such hazardous fuels reduction activities, on federal land, or on adjacent nonfederal land for activities that mitigate the threat of catastrophic fire to communities and natural resources in high risk areas; enhance local and small business employment opportunities for rural communities; enhance the knowledge and fire protection capability of rural fire districts by providing assistance in education and training, protective clothing and equipment purchase, and mitigation methods on a cost share basis.

General information about this opportunity
Last Known Status
Active
Program Number
15.228
Federal Agency/Office
Agency: Department of the Interior
Office: Bureau of Land Management
Type(s) of Assistance Offered
ADVISORY SERVICES AND COUNSELING; DISSEMINATION OF TECHNICAL INFORMATION; PROJECT GRANTS; PROVISION OF SPECIALIZED SERVICES; TRAINING; USE OF PROPERTY, FACILITIES, OR EQUIPMENT
Program Accomplishments
Fiscal Year 2014: 219 proposals were received 23 were funded for Communities at risk from catastrophic wildland fires to provide assistance in the following areas: assessment and planning, mitigation activities, and community and homeowner education and action; plan and implement hazardous fuels reduction activities, including the training, monitoring or maintenance associated with such hazardous fuels reduction activities, on federal land, or on adjacent nonfederal land for activities that mitigate the threat of catastrophic fire to communities and natural resources in high risk areas; and enhance local and small business employment opportunities for rural communities. Fiscal Year 2015: 128 proposals were received 23 were funded for same work identified in fiscal year 2014. Fiscal Year 2016: Anticipating 130 proposals and 15-20 awards to be made.
Authorization
Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012, Public Law 112-74, Division E, Title I, Department-wide Programs, Wildland Fire Management; This program was first implemented in the Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2001, Title IV, Public Law 106-291.
Who is eligible to apply/benefit from this assistance?
Applicant Eligibility
States and local governments at risk as published in the Federal Register, Indian Tribes, public and private education institutions, nonprofit organizations, and rural fire departments serving a community with a population of 10,000 or less in the wildland/urban interface.
Beneficiary Eligibility
States and local governments at risk as published in the Federal Register, Indian Tribes, public and private education institutions, nonprofit organizations, and rural fire departments serving a community with a population of 10,000 or less in the wildland/urban interface.
Credentials/Documentation
For grants awarded, cost will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No. A-87 for State and Local Governments; OMB Circular No. A-21 for educational institutions; OMB Circular No. A-122 for nonprofit organizations; and Federal Acquisition Regulation Subpart 31.2 for private foundations, firms, individuals, and other nonprofits excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-122. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.
What is the process for applying and being award this assistance?
Pre-Application Procedure
For more information and local requirements, cooperative project proposals should be coordinated with the Bureau of Land Management local State or District/Field Offices. Environmental impact information is not required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.
Application Procedure
This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards. Wildland Urban Interface Community Assistance is coordinated by Bureau State and Field Offices. No specific application forms apply, except for grants awarded, the standard application forms furnished by the Federal agency and required by 43 CFR Part 12, Subpart C, "Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments," and 43 CFR Part 12, Subpart F, "Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Nonprofit Organizations", must be used by this program.
Award Procedure
Wildland Urban Interface community projects are reviewed at State level and funding recommendations are made through each State's annual work plan. Final budget approvals rest with the State Director or Field Office Manager.
Deadlines
Not Applicable.
Approval/Disapproval Decision Time
Award time varies depending on the type of complexity of the project. Most awards are anticipated within 90 days or less after the announcement closes. Further information will be available for each project at the time of the funding opportunity announcement is posted on www.grants.gov and may be obtained by contacting the point of contact listed in the funding opportunity announcement.
Appeals
Not Applicable.
Renewals
Not Applicable.
How are proposals selected?
Criteria used to select assistance proposals are based on their ability to reduce the risk of wildland fire to community values and to increase the capabilities of rural fire organizations, in the vicinity of Federal lands.
How may assistance be used?
Hazard reduction activities are restricted to Federal lands, or adjacent nonfederal land for activities that benefit resources on Federal land. Most of these lands are located in the Western United States and Alaska. Assistance can be used for helping BLM support community based efforts to address defensible space and fuels management issues to support outreach and education efforts associated with fuels management and risk reduction activities and to increase the effectiveness of rural fire protection. Funding is highly variable each fiscal year. For more specific information please contact the headquarters office.
What are the requirements after being awarded this opportunity?
Reporting
Unless otherwise stated in the award document, recipients are required to submit quarterly, semi-annual or annual performance reports 30 days following the end of the reporting period. For any grant or cooperative agreement that is terminated, transferred to a new grantee, or will not be extended, grantees must submit a final performance report 90 days after the end date of grant performance. Cash reports are not applicable. Progress reports are not applicable. Unless otherwise stated in the award document, recipients are required to submit quarterly, SF-425, Federal Financial Reports 30 days following the end of the reporting period. A final SF-425 is required 90 days after the end date of grant performance. Performance monitoring is not applicable.
Auditing
In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503.
Records
Records relating to work performed and costs are kept by the Bureau. There is no fixed records schedule. Records for grants awarded to non-federal entity will be maintained in accordance 2 CFR, Part 200, Subpart D Post Federal Award Requirements.
Other Assistance Considerations
Formula and Matching Requirements
This program has no statutory formula.
Matching Requirements: The program has no matching requirements, however, matching funds by the applicant are encouraged and those projects are most likely to be funded.
MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.
Length and Time Phasing of Assistance
No specific restrictions, however, most projects are funded on a year-to-year basis and funds are expended during a particular fiscal year. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Frequency of recipient payment will be determined for each awarded assistance agreement at time of award.
Who do I contact about this opportunity?
Regional or Local Office
See Regional Agency Offices. See Catalog Appendix IV for addresses.
Headquarters Office
Chief, Division of Fire Planning and Fuels Management, Bureau of Land Management, (FA-600), National Interagency Fire Center, 3833 S. Development Ave., Boise, Idaho 83705 Phone: (208) 387-5186.
Website Address
http://www.blm.gov/nhp/index.htm
Financial Information
Account Identification
14-1125-0-1-302.
Obligations
(Cooperative Agreements) FY 14 $4,748,305; FY 15 est $3,575,000; and FY 16 est $3,500,000
Range and Average of Financial Assistance
Past partnership projects have ranged from $5,000 to $686,000. Average amount is $47,400 or less.
Regulations, Guidelines and Literature
BLM's wildland urban interface community assistance program is guided by the provisions of the National Fire Plan. A variety of public information on this plan is available by contacting the appropriate State Office or the National Interagency Fire Center's web site at: http://www.nifc.gov.
Examples of Funded Projects
Fiscal Year 2014: (1) Long-term impacts of wildfire on fuel loads, vegetation composition, and potential fire behavior and management in sagebrush-dominated ecosystems. This project will quantify the long term influence of past fires (12-30 years) on fuel loads, vegetation composition, and subsequent wildfire behavior, effects, and management in the three dominant big sagebrush ecosystems of the Northern Great Basin and Columbia Plateau. (2) Programmatic Analysis of Fuel Treatments: from the landscape to the national level. This project will design and demonstrate a spatial planning system that generates cost effective fuel treatment (FT) programs at the landscape and national scales with regional extensions. We will demonstrate how FT programs can respond to changes in funding levels nationally and on a particular landscape. (3) Phase Dynamics of Wildland Fire Smoke Emissions and Their Secondary Organic Aerosols. This project is a detailed study examining the phase partitioning behavior of biomass burning emissions under scenarios applicable to both the laboratory and the field. Fiscal Year 2015: (1) Modeling long-term effects of fuel treatments on fuel loads and fire regimes in the Great Basin. The project will assess the efficacy of fuel management strategies at decadal time-scales by synthesizing existing data to develop inputs for a vegetation dynamics model, the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. The purpose of using the process-based ED model is to provide alternative future scenarios of the sagebrush-steppe ecosystem of the Great Basin under changing climate and fire regimes. (2) Relations among cheatgrass-driven fire, climate, and sensitive-status birds across the Great Basin. This project will model current and future spatial interactions among cheatgrass cover and biomass, precipitation, and fire across the Great Basin and to model current and future cover of sagebrush and herbaceous vegetation. We further will examine how projected changes in fire regimes and fire and fuels treatments may affect habitat quality for and probability of occupancy of sensitive-status breeding birds. Additionally, we will use statistical change-point analyses9 to detect any abrupt, nonlinear temporal changes—thresholds—in projected vegetation cover, habitat quality, and occupancy10 . Detection of ecological thresholds, if they exist, may suggest fuels treatments and restoration actions that will decrease the probability of entering into or remaining within undesirable ecological states. (3) Do perennial bunchgrasses competitively exclude Bromus tectorum in post-fire rehabilitation? This project will examine the distribution of tectorum and perennial bunchgrasses across plot, site, and landscapes scales on locations with and without post-fire rehabilitation using spatial analysis of photoquadrats. The spatial analyses will allow us to address the following research questions:
a) Does seeding Poa secunda, elymoides, and cristatum after a fire reduce the dispersion of tectorum at the plot or site scale? b) Is the spatial distribution of grass species consistent among sites across landscapes?. Fiscal Year 2016: No current data available.